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  • Science Doesn’t Sleep (5.13.08) | BEYONDbones
    What if It could illustrate whatever they were curious about and lots of the finalists had some very scientific questions about the future like What if I could make another sun So check out these kids very cool art and vote for your favorite in each age group the winners will appear on the Google homepage on May 22 CritterCam isn t the only way to safely and accurately observe wild animal behavior scientists also use camera traps which are placed in the wild and motion activated They mostly take one image but one scientists has rigged them to take a series of photos which can be played as a short movie It s an amazing way to see what animals are like when we aren t around NASA has found something really cool specifically the discovery of an object in our galaxy that astronomers have been hunting for over 50 years Aliens Bad Astronomer says no and I m inclined to agree what do you think it is Would you volunteer to be struck by lightning And don t foget to let us know what YOU would ask a paleontologist You ask the questions we ll get the answers

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/05/science-doesnt-sleep-51308/ (2016-02-12)
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  • What would YOU ask a Paleontologist? | BEYONDbones
    far outnumber those that only scavenge although they are quick to scavenge too if the meat is there It makes one skeptical that any flesh eating dinosaur would be strictly scavengers The case for scavenging is just weaker an argument than that they were predators Kim on July 16 2008 at 10 32 am said I know someone who found a dinosaur egg the size of a basketball cracked open on top with the fetus exposed What would that be worth Erin on July 18 2008 at 10 28 am said Hi Kim I ve sent your question to David Temple our associate curator paleontology and I am sure we ll have an answer for you here soon Also to Scott Dr Bakker sent the following reply to your question about whether dinosaurs actually killed other dinosaurs or if they were exclusively scavengers Could the rex kill Look at the rex forehead it s incredibly wide Jaw muscles filled the head here so the bite would be tremendous One snap of those jaws and the duck bill s head would be bitten off 2 We have fossils of herbivorous dinos that were bitten and escaped Up in the museum at Malta Montana where the duck bill mummy Leonardo came from they have a juvenile duck bill that was bitten by a tyrannosaur a big chunk of the rump was ripped out You can still see the row of bite marks left by the predator it was a daspletosaur an early relative of T rex The duck bill got away The wounds left on the backbone have healed over There are a couple of other duck bills that were bitten while alive then escaped Dozens of paleontologists study tyannosaurs and other meat eaters from the Msozoic All these scientists except one agree that carnivorous dinos regularly killed prey Of course like lions today a tyrannosaur would be delighted to find a duck bill already dead victim of a flood or drought Steven on July 31 2008 at 2 21 pm said Hi Kim I got a response for you from David Temple our Associate Curator of Paleontology here at the HMNS Your fossil sounds good really too good Where was it found It would definitely be worth taking a look at you can email me pictures at DTemple HMNS org or to set up an appointment to look at it If it is real it would be scientifically important and of value I would like to get a closer look Thanks for the inquiry David Temple Myria on October 14 2008 at 7 20 pm said I am 12 years old and have wanted to be a paleontologist since I was 2 Yes that is a long time I was wondering what I can do other than stay in school and make good grades to make sure I can become a paleontologist Are there certain books I can read All of the books at the museum are too simple for me How can I go on a dig How can I meet a paleontologist Leonardo was more than awesome I thought it was soooo cool to see the ancent dinosaur up close I got to see all the details from the shoulder muscels to the damaged rib bones Thank you for your time in reading this Myria Erin on October 15 2008 at 11 42 am said Hi Myria That s wonderful I am so glad to hear that you enjoyed the Leonardo exhibit and that you want to be a paleontologist I ve been lucky enough to go on a few digs and I can tell you that it s an amazing experience Thanks for reading the blog and for your question I will ask our paleontologists to comment here in response In the meantime here are a few things you might be interested in Our paleontology department runs a series of digs along the Brazos River the next one is on Oct 18 Click on the link for more information on how you can participate Dr Bakker our curator of paleontology will be at the museum for Dino Days on Nov 1 He ll be drawing dinosaurs and answering questions so if you d like to meet a paleontologist this is a great chance to do so Plus Dr Bakker has invited everyone to participate in our Draw A Dinosaur Contest Just draw your favorite dinosaur and get it to us by Nov 1 and Dr Bakker will pick a winner each for two categories scientific accuracy and artistic effect More details are at the link above Thanks again for your comment Bob on October 15 2008 at 3 29 pm said Dear Myria Thanks for writing Did you know that the very first professional paleontologist the first person to get paid for digging skeletons and getting them to museums started at the age of 12 That was back in 1811 And the person excavated complete Jurassic sea reptile specimens first an ichthyosaur then a plesiosaur then a dactyl The finds became so famous that professors from all over the world came to Lyme Regis England to meet the kid This pioneering bone hunter was Miss Mary Anning She spent her whole life digging Jurassic fossils She not only excavated bones but invertebrates too especially coiled squid like species known as ammonites Once she got a perfect Jurassic squid preserved in black ocean bottom sediment Even the ink sac was preserved Mary dissolved some of the fossilized ink from the squid to make drawings of the fossil Mary Anning shows what you must do to become a field scientist She read voraciously Neighbors and relatives lent her science books especially volumes on anatomy and geology She taught herself to draw so she could make diagrams of her finds She trained her eye to see the key features in skulls bodies and limbs Her drawings were so accurate that they helped scientists understand how the petrified bodies were constructed She didn t go to school back in the early 1800 s few young women did But she kept in touch by letter with museum people all over the world Most important Anning observed living creatures to help her interpret her fossils She watched sharks and squid in the seas near her home She dissected oysters and clams to figure out fossilized shells And she appreciated all of Nature alive and petrified Our advice to you go to zoos and aquaria Watch animals move Borrow a video camera and make your own movies Make digital photos of lions and crocodiles turtles and lizards Label the parts Know where the femur is and the ulna and ilium Then come to the museum and diagram a Triceratops or a T rex Books are good So are real skulls and backbones You can order skulls from Skulls Unlimited in Oklahoma Then you can label the bones in the head There are field trips and lab work you might be able to participate in watch our HMNS blog Keep thinking about the Deep Past all the critters who lived in prehistoric times And keep figuring out how each kind of animal fit into its habitat good luck Dr Bob Bakker Robert on October 15 2008 at 5 44 pm said Hi I am doing a project on a career and I chose being a paleontologist as my career choice I have 10 questionsto ask you 1 What made you choose being a paleontologist 2 Where else do you travel to find fossils 3 Is there something you like or dislike about your job 4 what part of paleontlogy do you like best working in the field or in the lab 5 Do you find this job easy with a family or without one 6 What do you do with the fossils you find 7 What skills would you need in this career What degrees would you need 8 Who emoloys you to find fossils 9 what is your history in this career 10 If you could have a different job would you take it you could send the answers to mpavlovic comcast net I hope you will get the chance to answer my questions Erin on October 15 2008 at 10 32 pm said Hi Robert Thank you for reading the blog and for all of these great questions I will ask our paleontologists to comment here in response They re often in the field and away fro computers so it may take a few days just wanted to let you know Thanks again Erin Nancy on October 18 2008 at 7 49 pm said Hi Robert Thank you for all the questions about a career as a paleontologist I am actually a micropaleontologist and I study one celled animals called Foraminifera As a child I was intrigued with dinosaurs and I believe that they inspired me to choose a career as a paleontologist years later when I was in college Fossils can be found all over the world depending on what you are looking for and depending on where you live some maybe nearby The farthest I have traveled to find fossils is Antarctica In response to what I like or dislike about my job well what I like is that I always am learning something new I like to work anywhere as long as it involves working with fossils My current job is in an office but I have worked at well site on drilling rigs in the field helping to excavate dinosaurs and been a docent in a museum My current job is easy for me because my husband is a geologist and he loves fossils He often goes to the field or museum with me and he is patient if I have to travel on short trips So if your family is supportive there should not be any problems with having a family The fossils I usually find and use are Foraminifera They are extremely important because they can help in dating rocks and identifying environments They are commonly used in the oil and gas industry to help correlate wells and identify rock and time units For my career you need at least a Master s degree although some companies require a PhD Currently I work for Devon Energy in Houston Texas who employs me to help them in hydrocarbon exploration In 1980 I graduated from Northern Illinois University with a Masters in Geology and a specialization in Micropaleontology I was then hired by Amoco Production Co and worked for them for 17 years In 2000 I started my own successful consulting firm called GeoFixit Consulting Devon Energy brought me on as a consultant in 2004 and hired me in 2006 Today I really enjoy working for Devon and all the opportunities I have In my spare time I am a docent at the Houston Museum of Natural Science and participate in other paleontological activities The job I have today is the ideal job and I can t imagine doing anything else I hope you will consider a career as a paleontologist It can be very rewarding Sincerely Nancy Engelhardt Moore Trisha Miller on June 23 2009 at 4 43 pm said Would it be possible to find petrified squid in Wyoming I have some rather interesting looking things that are anywhere from 1 to 3 in length that someone said were petrified squid Thank you Erin B on June 24 2009 at 11 27 am said Hi Trisha Chris Flis one of the Museum s paleontologists had this to say in response to your question Squid like Belemnites are commonly found Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks of Wyoming These cephalopods relatives of their contemporaries the Ammonites leave behind the pen or bullet shaped fossil shell that once housed its cuttlefish like inhabitant Hooked tentacles were used for grabbing prey which would include fish and other small marine creatures If you send a photo of your find to blogadmin hmns org we ll do our best to help identify it Happy fossil hunting heather on June 30 2009 at 6 42 pm said Hello I have a very round stone slightly larger than a tennis ball it is covered in hundreds of pock like marks of which approx 8 are holes that go inside the stone can you please tell me what it could be thank you Heather sureka on August 20 2009 at 8 45 pm said i hi im doing a school prject and i wanted to know if u could give me a few important questions and answers along with them bye Penelope on August 21 2009 at 8 43 pm said What kind of dinosaur has nostrils above its eyes sockets Erin F on August 24 2009 at 1 28 pm said Hi sureka Please send your questions to blogadmin hmns org and we ll see what we can do to help Thanks for reading kght2 on October 2 2009 at 4 58 pm said do all birds come from a specific raptor or do they come from different species of raptor that are cousins and not ancestors i wonder this because while all birds are similar they dont seem to be any more similar than different raptors i have seen and while this isnt great information i have heard of many raptors likely having some form for feathers i apologize for any poor spelling this form seems to think that raptor is spelled wrong so i d even love a correction on that but primarily i wonder if the consensus is that all birds came from a single species or that they came from a family of species instead and this answer would also have implications that people should know for any species or family of species PaudieN1 on October 22 2009 at 1 52 pm said My dream is to Become a Paleontologist I have a few questions 1 Is a Ph D in Geology enough to Become a Paleontologist 2 I live in Ireland so is there any course in Ireland that could qualify me to be a Paleontologist of the highest order If not where is the nearest place 3 as I said I live in Ireland so if I were to Become a Paleontologist could I organize an excavation in Hell Creek for example or any region in the world for that matter Any help would be greatly appreciated Thanks Jeremy Lereby on February 2 2010 at 10 54 am said What are the uses of the fossils of the anomalocaris canadensis britt on March 14 2010 at 6 56 pm said ok so if dinosaurs for the most part had tiny little brains and giant heads what filled up the rest of their head if not brain like some kind of brain slushie or what Vincent on March 16 2010 at 12 24 pm said I am 13 currently I have wanted to be a paleontologist for my whole life I study the required subjects to achieve high grades in them I read books about evolution and biographies of paleontologists I am going to volunteer at my local museum When I become the minimum age but for the time being I am not fully sure on what to do to help me progress towards this career Thank you for reading this post and I hope you relpy Best regards Vincent Elizabeth Krispin on March 19 2010 at 12 57 pm said Hello I am an afterschool teacher of 2nd and 3rd graders who are wanting to learn about dinosaurs I am wondering if you would be willing and able to answer a handful of questions about dinosaurs and paleontology in April of this year when we start this unit If you are willing please email me and maybe we can set up a date when you can expect these questions to come your way and would be able to handle it Thanks Elizabeth Susan Kollaja on September 10 2010 at 1 46 pm said Hi I teach a class on dinosaurs to Pre K 2 We have an activity on measuring footprints body length and stride length Could you tell me the stride length of the following dinosaurs Tyrannosaurus Rex Apatosaurus and Troodon Thank you Susan Kollaja Dillon on November 10 2010 at 9 46 pm said I have all sorts of questions for a paleontologist this kind of opportunity to talk to a paleontologist by the way Bob I m a big fan and I m sorry about this comment being a few years after the post Probably the biggest question I can think of to ask is where can I get reliable information I have way to many questions to ask do you know if there s a database or something of in depth material where I can find information That s always been a setback for me I ask stuff like How did the species of Dimetrodon or Iguanodon differ I can t find anything on that I wish there was a go to place that had more than just those little factoids you can find in any kid s book Right now the best source I can find is wikipedia and I think that s kind of sad I always see things that say all the theories but then never give anything that the scientists use to back that up Anyway any response to this comment would be appreciated Brian Fugler on November 24 2010 at 4 53 am said I have just viewed a program on the Discovery Channel that went into great detail as to what happend to the LAND DWELLING dinosaurs after an asteroid hit the earth off the coast of what is now the Yucatan Pennisula However what happend to the SEA DWELLING dinosaurs who were not affected by such disasters as air borne dust clouds etc etc Thank you RKhamis on May 17 2011 at 2 44 pm said I have 2 questions

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/05/what-would-you-ask-a-paleontologist/ (2016-02-12)
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  • PHOTO From You: Insect Identification | BEYONDbones
    which share several characteristics with insects such as segmented bodies jointed appendages and a hard exoskeleton Spiders belong to the class Arachnida along with scorpions ticks mites and some other weird looking things Arachnids all have 8 legs 2 main body segments and a pair of jaw like fang bearing appendages All arachnids are predators which feed on a wide variety of small prey including insects and most are harmless to humans This means that they can actually be helpful in your home or garden This striking photograph is of one of my favorite spiders the Venusta Orchard Spider Leucauge venusta In Latin venusta means beautiful and as you can see this is a gorgeous spider The Venusta Orchard Spider is a small orb weaver that likes to hang out in light open areas near shrubs and trees They construct a horizontal web about 1 foot wide They cling below the web or a nearby twig and wait for an unsuspecting insect to become entangled These spiders like most are very shy and harmless to humans Consider it a beautiful natural little ornament for your garden Thank you so much Ben for sending in the great picture and reading our

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/05/photo-from-you-insect-identification/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Science Doesn’t Sleep (5.12.08) | BEYONDbones
    look fat photo credit Jimmy theSuperStar So here s what went down after you logged off They don t have a fashion industry but even fish have body image problems In honor of this past Sunday s holiday Science Buzz has the best and worst places on Earth to be a mother And there are 26 of them that are better than here President Hawking Scientists are being trained to run for office National Geographic has photos of the 1000 tombs that were recently discovered in Colombia Nostradamus and SciGuy weigh in on the CERN controversy Not surprisingly they don t agree It s only because they re not using AT T to connect but scientists say it s cheaper to send information from the Hubble Telescope to Earth than it is to text someone in the next room Mental Floss wants to know Have you ever smelled something in a dream 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged AT T body image CERN colombia dream fish Mothers Day national geographic nostradamus steven hawking texting tombs by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS In a

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/05/science-doesnt-sleep-51208/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Elephants and Chemistry | BEYONDbones
    decomposes into liquid water H 2 O and oxygen gas O 2 The bubbles you see are oxygen bubbles In case you were wondering oxygen atoms don t like to hang around alone so they bond to each other and that s why we get O 2 instead of just O If you are a person who counts atoms and you noticed that our atoms didn t quite add up you re right the balanced equation for the reaction is usually written 2H 2 O 2 2H 2 O O 2 The large 2 s mean two of that whole atom two hydrogen peroxide molecules can react to create two water molecules and one oxygen molecule If the equation looks strange to you don t worry just know that the molecules do the right thing What isn t included in this equation is that the blood in your cut initiates this reaction it contains an enzyme called catalase Something to try If you have a bottle of 3 hydrogen peroxide at home I have a project for you if you are a kid do this with your parents You need 3 hydrogen peroxide yeast dish soap and a cup or bowl Most people face bigger hazards in the kitchen every time they cook but it is a good idea to wear safety glasses or goggles just in case something splashes or falls and breaks and hydrogen peroxide in your eye would definitely sting Put some yeast I used about a teaspoon of quick rise yeast in the bottom of your container Add enough water to wet the yeast and swirl it around or stir it a little Now add a little dish soap and swirl or mix again You may want to set the container or a plate to help contain the mess before you add the hydrogen peroxide I added approximately 1 4 cup 60 mL Here the hydrogen peroxide is starting to react and the soap catches the oxygen gas and it starts to produce foam But it keeps going And going And going And going The yeast contains catalase your blood does too and that helps the reaction happen faster but the big thing to notice is that a small volume of hydrogen peroxide reacted to create a big volume of oxygen gas the soap just helped catch it so we could see it better Any time you start with a liquid and make a gas if the gas can expand it will and usually a lot Oh and even though the reaction is called Elephant s Toothpaste please don t try to eat it Yuck 2 0 0 This entry was posted in Education and tagged atom balanced equation catalase chemical reaction chemistry decompose elephant s toothpaste equation foam graduated cylinder hydrogen peroxide make bubbles molecule react reaction soap things to try water yeast by Carolyn L Bookmark the permalink About Carolyn L Carolyn coordinates the Science on Stage outreach program at HMNS and will blog

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/05/elephants-and-chemistry/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Looking Back… | BEYONDbones
    13th 1939 the first commerical FM radio station went live in Bloomfield Conneticut The WDRC station once known for playing oldies is now modernized and more known for playing classic rock from the 70 s on May 14th 1796 the first successful vaccine was developed by Edward Jenner in order to battle smallpox The disease had a 20 30 mortality rate and killed 300 million people in the 20th century alone In 1977 after a massive vaccination program the World Health Organization declared smallpox to be eradicated A home away from home On May 14th 1973 Skylab the first American space station was launched into orbit Three missions were sent to the lab during the 2249 days it stayed in orbit The longest a crew stayed in aboard the space station was eighty nine days If you can see this then you might need a Flash Player upgrade or you need to install Flash Player if it s missing Get Flash Player from Adobe 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged edward jenner first mother s day looking back Science skylab smallpox vaccine wdrc world health organization by Steven Bookmark the permalink About Steven Steven never

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/05/looking-back-4/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Science Doesn’t Sleep (5.8.08) | BEYONDbones
    does pay to be lazy 5000 a month to be exact That s how much NASA will give you to stay in bed all day Britain s Astronomer Royal says we only have a 50 chance of making it through just the next century That s just one of the super fun predictions in Daily Galaxy s morning roundup of what s going to get us climate change or a man made disaster Here in Houston it just might be the giant sinkhole that s opened up 60 miles from here Via Fewer than 40 Amur leopards are known to exist making them the world s rarest big cat But National Geographic has captured new images of eight of them in the wild Yes but can I get internet Communications regulators in the UK are saying that a WiFi setup inside your body could be used to alert a hospital to your heart attack or other health emergency 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged Amur leopard bottled water cats climate change Greendex Houston hummer NASA national geographic sinkhole WiFi by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/05/science-doesnt-sleep-5808/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Bye-bye blondie, massive mars and the potato powered web! | BEYONDbones
    for the top 10 science hoaxes of all time Among these shams of science are a web server powered with potatoes the idea that blondes are headed for extinction the origin of this hoax is an article that the World Health Organization has since requested a retraction of from the Sunday Times and the email reminding you not to miss the once in a lifetime experience of seeing the closest approach Mars will EVER make to the Earth s surface I know now you re thinking yeah I got that email I did as well According to Snopes this will be the sort of prank email that we will see again and again it started in 2003 and just won t go away You can check out many other hoaxes and even take the gullibility test at museumofhoaxes com 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged blondes discovery extinction hoaxes Mars moon museum potatoes by Allison Bookmark the permalink About Allison After volunteering at HMNS since 1993 Allison joined HMNS full time in 2003 Her current job responsibilities include curating the education collections and keeping the summer camp classrooms stocked with materials facilitating Education special events

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/05/bye-bye-blondie-massive-mars-and-the-potato-powered-web/ (2016-02-12)
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