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  • Photo From You: Insect Identification | BEYONDbones
    a normal cricket Their front legs are equipped with little claws which help them dig and construct their tunnels These claws are called dactyls and their number and arrangement help scientists differentiate between certain species Most species have well developed wings which can carry them for about 5 miles during their mating season They are also very good swimmers Mole crickets are omnivores and they will will feast on worms insect larvae and roots underground as well as grasses at the surface I m not sure which species is pictured here but more than likely the Southern mole cricket or the tawny mole cricket It looks as if it may be immature due to the lack of well developed wings These two species are most common in the southern part of the country Unfortunately they are both introduced species and can be considered pests in some areas These little guys are harmless however and for those who are lucky enough to spot one a really great photo opportunity Well thank you so much for sending in the great photo Rachel and for reading about us in Virginia This insect will always hold a special place in my heart as one of the weirdest looking things I ve seen As always Happy bug watching Want to learn more about insects Keep reading Check out an insect that spends the summer singing Costa Rica bug geek paradise Mantis maaaaadness 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Plants Insects and tagged bug geek bugs cicadas Cockrell Butterfly Center cricket crickets dactyls erin mills grasshoppers gryllotalpidae HMNS insect identification insects katydids mantis mole mole cricket omnivores orthopteran orthopterans photo from you Rachel Drew science museum species thorax virginia beach by Erin M Bookmark the permalink About Erin M As an entomologist at the

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/photo-from-you-insect-identification-3/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Mixers, Elixirs, & IMAX 2008 – tell us what you think! | BEYONDbones
    you not What do you want to see next year Take this opportunity to tell me how would you plan this party As we begin planning the 2009 season yup we re going to planning for next year as soon as the last band rolls out I want to incorporate your suggestions so leave a comment and let me know what we can do to make Mixers even more of a blast next year 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Giant Screen Theatre and tagged calvin owens grupo ka che mixers 2008 season mixers elixirs and imax mixers houston party Science science museum stevie wonder suggestions yvonne washington by Jamie Bookmark the permalink About Jamie I love my job As promotions manager Jamie throws parties for a living and she can t wait to share the fun View all posts by Jamie 2 thoughts on Mixers Elixirs IMAX 2008 tell us what you think Cassie Cole on October 10 2008 at 11 22 am said As a social event for my company s new hire group I brought 133 total guests to ME I on August 22 Everyone had a good time and we received a lot of positive feedback for shaking up our monthly happy hour However we were a bit disappointed in the event itself To start ee had come to expect a more upscale event While our members came dressed for a night on the town midtown chic we felt very overdressed in a sea of denim Then having expected a selection of appetizers we found only make your own nachos with no polite way to eat the chips covered in beans and queso We also found the IMAX schedule to be confusing We had distributed the schedule for IMAX movies provided on the event s website Upon arrival however some of our members were given a leaflet and told that the schedule was different We then planned our IMAX viewing based on the leaflet and ended up in the Grand Canyon Adventure instead of Dinosaurs 3D In addition to my day job I m a freelance event planner From a marketing perspective you might consider the following recommendations for next season 1 Enforce a dress code The specific dress code need not be complicated Most venues in the midtown district mandate no sandals no sneakers no athletic wear and no excessively baggy clothing This will make ME I a classy event which will attract a higher end clientele 2 Upgrade your appetizers Finger foods that require minimal use of a napkin are recommended While crab puffs are always nice you don t need to spend too much money here Small chicken fingers fruit and cheese trays and crudite are usually more than enough to satisfy Try to select a variety of appetizers and spread them around the main hall s This will cut down on the lines for food and will discourage visitors from congregating in one area 3 Confirm the IMAX schedule in

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/mixers-elixirs-imax-2008/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.21.08) | BEYONDbones
    koval So here s what went down after you logged off A new population of a species of rare leopards has been discovered in the forest in Borneo providing new hope for this endangered species By analyzing Oetzi the Iceman s clothing scientists have discovered that the famous Neolithic man favored fashions made from sheep and cattle indicating he was a herdsman Their technique could have an impact on today s fashion industry Can you hear light New research thinks you can do anything you put your mind to Couldn t afford a satellite for Christmas last year Not to worry they re getting smaller and cheaper Proof that you never know what you ll find on eBay a scientists bought a fossilized bug online and it turned out to be a previously unknown species of aphid 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged animal hair Anthropology borneo cheap satellite cloud leopard eBay endangered species environment fashion fiber fossil bug hear light herdsman neolithic new species fossilized insect oetzi the iceman rainforest satellite Science senses small satellite species by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/science-doesnt-sleep-82108/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Making way for BODY WORLDS, the changing face of the HMNS basement | BEYONDbones
    this change is about as big The discovery place platform tranformed into a pile of plywood We add so many classrooms to accommodate our summer camps only 8 of our 20 classrooms are actually permanent that there is always a period of deconstruction but for many years we have held on to the three classrooms along the edge of Fondren Discovery Place for school year programs This year that all changes BODY WORLDS will be moving in very shortly and will occupy a good portion of the lower level and the 2nd floor of the Museum it sounds like there will be a lot of amazing things to see and I m sure that our bloggers will keep you updated on more specifics as they become available So the next time you visit us in the Museum s basement things will be looking a bit different but there will still be a lot of learning going on Our weekday labs and teacher trainings begin in just a couple of weeks along with Overnights and Educational programs and open houses for the whole family The Discovery place exhibits on parade down the hallway they will soon find their new home at

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/making-way-for-body-worlds-the-changing-face-of-the-hmns-basement/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.20.08) | BEYONDbones
    here s what went down after you logged off With dead zones expanding and a growing continent of plastic is it too late to save the ocean It s coming Here s an update on CERN s progress as we countdown to the big day they throw the switch Sept 10 Shipwrecks not just bad for the boat New evidence suggests that coral reefs are victims too Shocker the current mass extinction may not be the only one humans are responsible for Japan has mandated that products are printed with information about their carbon footprint Will people pay attention A Chicago man recently passed a tapeworm A tapeworm that s taller than he is All hail the underdog the Olympics are full of elite athletes who science says shouldn t be the best 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged athletes carbon footprint CERN coral reef dead zones environment global warming huge tapeworm japan large hadron collider lhc mass extinction ocean olympics olympics 2008 plastic continent save the ocean shipwrecks sports science Summer Olympics tapeworm by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS In a past

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/science-doesnt-sleep-82008/ (2016-02-12)
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  • VIDEO: Explore The Wiess Energy Hall | BEYONDbones
    across that the Wiess Energy Hall is a great resource for all ages and for people from all walks of life I was excited when I heard that such a financial icon was coming to check us out If I were an investor I would want to know all I could about the industries that I was investing in While they were here Meredith interviewed me and compiled a short video The film also shows the large variety of displays in the hall If you can see this then you might need a Flash Player upgrade or you need to install Flash Player if it s missing Get Flash Player from Adobe Explore Energy Meredith Cantrell speaks with Claire Scoggin Director of the Wiess Energy Hall at the Houston Museum of Natural Science for a piece in the Oil Gas Investor online They have kindly agreed to let us share it here Videography by Lindsay Goodier The day this was filmed we also met Lindsay Goodier the Online Editor for Oil and Gas Investor who has a blog called Oil Rules which I thoroughly enjoy reading She is always on top of what is developing in the oil and gas

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/video-explore-the-wiess-energy-hall/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.19.08) | BEYONDbones
    of advanced cognitive abilities in animals Now we ve discovered that magpies can do it Back to school kids are still savoring the last days of summer but teachers spending their first days back at HMNS soaking up science and learning ways to use the exhibits here to bring science to life for their students next year Another humpback whale is lost this time a calf in the waters outside Sydney It s bonded to a yacht and if an adult female doesn t come by soon it may not survive No wonder bees are dying in record numbers their hives are filled with pesticides Coming soon Robots part of a balanced diet The 1918 flu epidemic killed between 20 100 million people worldwide survivors of the epidemic alive today still have circulating antibodies to the disease 80 90 years later An old wive s tale that s somewhat true severe morning sickness increases the possibility of delivering a baby girl 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged 1918 flu epidemic beehives bees cognitive ability in animals colony collapse disorder dolphin eat robot edible robot Education elephant great apes HMNS humpback whale lost whale magpies morning

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/science-doesnt-sleep-81908/ (2016-02-12)
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  • One tough decision… | BEYONDbones
    extended the invite to use the backyard of his own ranch house We went ahead and accompanied him to his backyard which contained pigs poultry and a small garden with large trumpet vine flowers While it didn t appear to be much we went ahead and obligingly strung our bat nets which proved surprisingly productive as the evening rolled in The pigs and poultry respectively lured in both common D rotundus and hairy legged Diphylla ecaudata vampire bats The deep corolla tubed flowers lured in a nectar feeding bat called the Mexican hog nosed bat Choeronycteris mexicana which had never been recorded in the reserve So there we sat around the table dimly illuminated by kerosene lamp In my hand I held a small cloth sack which fit comfortably in the palm of my hand The sack contained a young male hog nosed bat we could tell it was a young bat because the finger knuckles were swollen as the bone joints were not fully fused un ossified phalanges And thus began the dilemma this species of bat had never been recorded in the reserve before but in order to make the record official we had to sacrifice the bat to prepare as a museum voucher specimen As a young grad student affiliated with the Museum at Texas Tech University I had sacrificed and prepared quite a few study specimens but none were necessarily of species that were rare in nature We found many reasons to sacrifice the little bat and many reasons to set it free Our morals were in a hyper state of flux well Choeronycteris is not considered Endangered so it should be fine to collect it but it has to be rare otherwise it would have been collected before but then again as budding young scientists it would be great to prove our worth by documenting a new species for the reserve but could we keep our dignity if the species was in fact rare all for the sake of a published note What to DO what to do What would you have done Post log 13 August 2008 In the end we set the little bugger go Perhaps this was the right decision if you believe in karma as I have gone on to document much more relevant records in the years that have ensued including new state records regional records country records and most importantly new species At such an early stage of my career the fate of this little bat that evening in Alta Cime proved an incredibly tough decision Such decisions became less difficult with time and in the years that followed I collected and prepared many specimens But I will never forget the complex issues each of the four of us mulled over that evening in Mexico s newest reserve over the fate of a young nectar feeding bat 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Zoology and tagged alta cime Artibueus jamaicensis birdwatching Choeronycteris mexicana common vampire bate desmodus rotundus diphylla ecaudata el cielo el cielo biosphere reserve El Cielo Reserve endangered ethical dilemma horn professors j knox jones master s thesis Mexican hog nosed bat mexico Neotropical bats Neotropical Mammalogy new species rare species robert j baker S ludovici spam state records Sturnira lilium texas hill country texas tech university thesis project tropic of cancer zoology graduate student dilemmas by Dan Bookmark the permalink About Dan As curator of vertebrate zoology Dr Brooks has more backbone s than anyone at the Museum He is recognized internationally as the authority on Cracids the most threatened family of birds in the Americas With an active research program studying birds and mammals of Texas and the tropics Brooks advises several grad students internationally At HMNS Brooks served as project manager of the world renowned Frensley Graham Hall of African Wildlife overseeing building by an incredibly diverse array of talent by some 50 individuals He has also created and or served as curator for various traveling exhibits including Cracids on Wings of Peril View all posts by Dan 14 thoughts on One tough decision Lisa on August 19 2008 at 10 21 am said Great blog I can imagine being out there and the debate in your decision You are a good writer Keep up the good work Jim on August 19 2008 at 10 51 am said Dan I usually am not much into reading blogs and I have to say especially those about wildlife because at times I find the authors to be completely immersed in their own ideologies and philosophical opinions and forget about telling a story not to mention they are not very informative about reality However I read your piece on ONE TOUGH DECISION and I have to say not only well written but a very good story It made me reflect on my own moment in my career of a very similar tough decision and made me think of how many other budding biologist naturalists run into that same issue I told the story to my son truncated who although is only 7 is very much into nature and is coming to terms with some of these very issues with nature and how nature conservation is at times managed whether you agree or disagree with the methods We had a very good talk about what he would do and why interesting coming from a childs point of view and telling him what I did in the same situation and why In today s day and age wildlife and its management is a very complex issue Thanks for the content Kurt Benirschke on August 19 2008 at 11 17 am said Dan What a surprise to read my very first blog I had never done so and am enchanted by all the stuff you accumulated here What bugs me though is that you have yet to send me a placenta of any kind of bat I have a vampire nor a pregnant uterus This would be much

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/one-tough-decision/ (2016-02-12)
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