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  • Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.13.08) | BEYONDbones
    s at the top of the list Gorgeous art of course but the stunning architecture it is housed in really adds to the experience The American Museum in New York has fascinating pioneering science exhibitions and they are also a part of the history of museums in the United States Teddy Roosevelt led expeditions that added to their natural history collection for example so that adds a nice dimension as well What about you What are some of your favorite museums Dave on August 17 2008 at 1 01 pm said Erin I know there are much more on your list In no particular order 1 British Museum 2 Metropolitan Museum of Art 3 Louvre 4 Field Museum 5 The Getty Museum 6 Art Institute of Chicago 7 American Museum of Natural History 8 The Prado 9 Victoria and Albert Museum 10 Natural History Museum in London 11 State Hermitage 12 Museum of Modern Art and more I ve been on a huge travelling spree over the last 5 years Sarah on August 17 2008 at 5 32 pm said Great topic peeps I think you nailed it Erin when you said that art and science are not mutually exclusive topics but do approach the same subjects with different perspectives I know I was scratching my head when Pompeii was shown at the MFAH instead of HMNS but after looking at it further realized that there were many important discoveries in Pompeii that gave us a glimpse of Roman art as well as seeing a city frozen in the height of Roman culture Dave on August 18 2008 at 2 54 pm said Erin HMNS does a great job of attracting the public with its great traveling exhibits However I feel that much of the museum s popularity is really due to these exhibits and not to the permanent exhibits In my opinion I really am not overwhelmed by the permanent exhibits The Gem hall is a great one though Many in my circle of friends and other people that I know agree with me I ve been to the American Museum of Natural History National Museum of Natural History the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History and the British Museum of Natural HIstory and these museum s permanent exhibits blow me away Erin on August 18 2008 at 3 12 pm said Hi Dave I m so glad you enjoy the traveling exhibits we do our best to bring the world s finest exhibitions to Houston so it s wonderful to hear that you and your friends enjoy them You re in good company if the mineral hall is your favorite it s constantly crowded We have an active Flickr group dedicated to the museum and many of the photos are from this exhibit Our permanent exhibitions are renovated on a rotating schedule so you may also enjoy the newest exhibits in the Wiess Energy Hall and Cockrell Butterfly Center Thanks for your feedback Dave on August 18 2008 at 4 47 pm said Are you able to provide any information on some of the fossils that are in museum collections and that are waiting to be put on display in the new wing Also how do you think HMNS permanent exhibits compare with the American Museum of Natural History National Museum of Natural History the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History and the British Museum of Natural History Erin on August 18 2008 at 5 12 pm said Hi Dave We re still in the planning stages for the upcoming expansion so we re not ready to talk about the specifics since they may change several times during development process Keep reading the blog as soon as we have details to share we ll post them here I think every one of the museums you mentioned has its own strong points The Dueling Dinosaurs at the LA Natural History Museum are spectacular and the building itself is beautiful The American Museum has a wonderful new permanent exhibition on evolution and an amazing planetarium HMNS is known the world over for our exhibits of the world s finest minerals and our pioneering Wiess Energy Hall Sadly I ve never been to The British Museum but we ve had exhibits featuring their Egyptology collections that were fascinating Dave on August 18 2008 at 5 22 pm said Is there really a distinct difference between natural science and natural history It seems as if HMNS and other natural histories have very similar objects fossils gems minerals african wildlife etc Dave on August 18 2008 at 5 23 pm said Oh yeah would you please combine this post with my previous one I remember there was a large Egypt exhibit a few years ago Were those objects from the British Museum Do you remember some of the highlights of that exhibition It has been so long Dave on August 19 2008 at 6 58 am said How come our Egypt collection is so small as it is just a small corner of the basement level I have heard some visitors ridiculing it Erin on August 19 2008 at 9 34 am said Hi Dave As I understand it the term natural science covers a much broader area than natural history which is the study of plants and animals Natural science according to the wikipedia definition linked above is a rational approach to the study of the universe HMNS does have several natural history exhibits like the Hall of African Wildlife and the Malacology Hall but we also have permanent exhibits on chemistry energy technology Earth science and mineralogy The traveling exhibitions we host here also cover an extremely broad range of topics as we ve discussed previously To answer your question about the traveling Egypt exhibit I believe you are referring to Mummy The Inside Story which was put together by The British Museum It featured the mummy of the Egyptian priest Nesperennub which had been scanned with high resolution

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/science-doesnt-sleep-81308/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Shall All Hail the Shale? (Shertain Shources Shay Yesh!) | BEYONDbones
    indigoprime Why are we just now getting this natural gas out In regular natural gas wells once a driller reaches the gas reservoir the gas flows naturally to the well through tiny pathways in the porous and permeable reservoir rock The gas in the Barnett Shale is locked in tinier pores with no pathways to let it flow If you just drill a well to it the gas won t budge Up until the last few decades there was no economical way to get the gas out of the shale Recently we have solved that problem with new technology 3D seismic imaging has made it possible to get accurate pictures of the underground layers so engineers can better plan well pathways to avoid obstacles like faults and water zones Horizontal drilling lets us avoid sensitive areas on the surface like parks or schools and put more of the well into the shale by going sideways rather than straight down Finally better hydraulic fracture methods allow us to inject high pressure water into the rock to make millions of tiny cracks in the shale so the gas flows to the well These procedures have made the Barnett Shale a very popular place for drilling The success of the Barnett Shale has renewed interest in other major shale formations in North America that were previously too tricky to drill and produce including the Haynesville Shale on the Texas borders with Arkansas and Louisiana the Marcellus and New Albany Shales in the Northeast and numerous others Some projections indicate that the Marcellus Shale may end up being more than twice the size of the Barnett And then there are the Canadian gas shales which have been estimated as high as one quadrillion cubic feet a hundred times Canada s current existing reserves In

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/shall-all-hail-the-shale-shertain-shources-shay-yesh/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.12.08) | BEYONDbones
    scientists have developed a stretchy rubber covering for robots that allows them to detect heat and pressure Elephants never forget really A new study has shown that herd matriarchs have exceptional memory for distant sources of food and water which can be the key to their herd s survival Just one restaurant can produce 490 tons of CO2 every year and there are 940 000 of them just in the US So how do you feel about green cuisine Have you been following the case of the missing viper at Moody Gardens It sounds like something out of Encyclopedia Brown but It s escaped for real twice And now investigators are pulling out the polygraph Did you stay up to watch the Perseid Meteor Shower What did you think Leave us a comment and let us all know what the experience was like 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged carbon emissions case of the missing viper CO2 elephant elephant memory elephants never forget encyclopedia brown fungus gaboon viper george observatory green cuisine green restaurant association jalapenos memory missing viper moody gardens perseid perseid meteor shower robot robot skin robotics Science spicy fungus spicy peppers viper

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/science-doesnt-sleep-81208/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Mourning the Dearly Departed | BEYONDbones
    even give you a hint and say that after you have found your gems you will be close enough to the Museum that you can come compare your stones to the crystals in Geopalooza or the Mineral Hall The number of paces needed to complete the short walk is indicated in the title of the blog both in number and very close to heading direction you should walk If you find the gems leave us a comment below to let us know and perhaps we can hide another set for someone else to find 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Gems Minerals and tagged agate agates caching geocaching Geopalooza GPS HMNS meteorite treasure treasure hunting trilobites by David Bookmark the permalink About David David is the Museum s associate curator of paleontology In addition to running the Museum s dig program in Seymour TX and curating exhibits he s also unofficial head of The Department of Mysteries a shadow wing of HMNS that deals with strange goo unusual fossils mysterious substances or any other unknown object you d like to know what to do with View all posts by David 5 thoughts on Mourning the Dearly Departed EMMY LOU on August 11 2008 at 8 30 pm said DAVID LOVE THE GEM PICTURE Bryanna on November 3 2008 at 5 05 pm said Did anyone ever find them Erin on November 4 2008 at 9 16 am said Hi Bryanna As far as I know they are still there No one has claimed them or let us know about it if they have David is the only one who knows exactly where they are and he s in north Texas right now on a fossil dig but I will have him check to make sure when he gets

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/mourning-the-dearly-departed/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Eating The Way To A New Wing | BEYONDbones
    support this mission just by eating out Katz s Deli on Westheimer just off Montrose has given the Museum the Benefit Table for the month of August What does that mean photo credit avlxyz The benefit table is a special table for parties of 6 or more who come to nosh at Katz s Ten percent of your bill at the end of the meal not including tax is donated to the cause of the month and for August the Museum s capital campaign has been selected as the cause Eat delicious goodness and support your favorite Museum at the same time I reccomend the rueben and Dave likes the fried pickels and bortsch photo credit jugglerpm All you need to do is eat pay and repeat if you are seated at the benefit table IF THE TABLE IS ALREADY TAKEN alert your server that you wanted to sit there and that you would like a portion of your bill donated to the Museum and that should take care of it What could be easier We will see you there 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Education and tagged bortsch Capital Campaign donation food fried pickels help the

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/eating-your-way-to-the-new-wing/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.11.08) | BEYONDbones
    at 1 15 pm said Erin I was wondering why some of the special exhibits such as Rome Kazakhstan the Vatican Shanghai Royal Tombs of Ur Tibet and the Vatican are in a natural science museum Most of these exhibits should be in an art museum Also is there anything natural science in the life of Diana Dave Erin on August 11 2008 at 1 52 pm said Hi Dave Thanks for reading the blog and for your question At HMNS we believe that the concept of natural science encompasses a broad range of topics all of which contribute something to our understanding of how the world works That includes history and while many of the exhibits you specify have a very strong artistic component our exhibitions also present a broad variety of information about the cultures that created these works of art through text panels videos and interactive exhibits So while an exhibit of busts from Rome could well rest in an art museum such art exhibits tend to focus on the pieces themselves as art objects alone with very little contextual information Seeing such an exhibit in a natural science museum means you will leave with a deeper understanding of the historical culture in which each piece was created how it was created and why to the best of our current understanding This contextual information comes to us through the science of anthropology Princess Diana was also a historical figure though more recent and anthropological exhibitions are known to examine a time place or culture through the prism of a notable individual Given time an exhibit of Diana s life that of a royal princess who had great influence on the world stage particularly in the lives of the victims of AIDS and land mines should seem comparable

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/science-doesnt-sleep-81108/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Looking Back… | BEYONDbones
    a wax mulberry paper rice paper Because the mimeograph uses no electricity to operate it is still used in developing countries Also on August 8 but in 1908 Wilbur Wright made his first public flight in France The Wright brothers faced deep scorn and were thought to be Bluffeurs Although Wilbur s flight only lasted 105 seconds he was able to fly in a circle and woed the crowd The brothers gained world fame overnight Newspapers that had posted doubts about the Wright brother recanted their early statements and issued apologies This is a video of the Wright brother s early flights If you can see this then you might need a Flash Player upgrade or you need to install Flash Player if it s missing Get Flash Player from Adobe On August 12 of 1981 the IBM Personal Computer was first released The PC was IBM s attempt to get into the small computer market which was currently dominated by the Atari 8 bit family and the Tandy Corporation TRS 80 s photo credit cjmaru On August 12 1990 the dinosaur Sue was discovered in Faith South Dakota Even today Sue remains the best preserved and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever uncovered The dinosaur resides in Chicago s Field Museum The skeleton is 42 feet from tail to nose and is 12 feet tall at the hips The bones are anywhere from 67 to 65 5 million years old 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged Chicago Field Museum dino dinosaur early planes first planes flight IBM mimeograph PC photocopier planes Sue t rex this day in science Thomas Edison Tyrannosaurus rex Wright brothers by Steven Bookmark the permalink About Steven Steven never dreamed his first job out of college would be in public relations

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/looking-back-14/ (2016-02-12)
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  • VIDEO: Mapping a dinosaur with Dr. Bob Bakker | BEYONDbones
    with skin impressions Until someone develops a time machine looking at Leonardo is the closest you can get to seeing a living dinosaur Until it opens Sept 19 we ll be bringing you a series of behind the scenes videos of our paleontology department preparing for the exhibit traveling to Montana where Leonardo was discovered working to prepare the fossils of another hadrosaur named Peanut for display and much more What do you want to see Let us know and we ll do our best to get it on film In our first video Dr Bakker David Temple and several of our paleontology volunteers create a map of Peanut that will help them study the specimen as it was discovered even after the fossils have all been removed and mounted You can also download the audio only version to listen on your mP3 player by right clicking here UPDATE If you can t see the video above you can now check it out on YouTube UPDATE Check out the second video in the series Dr Bakker explains why Leonardo is such an extraordinary find 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Paleontology and tagged acetate bakker bob bakker brachylophosaurus

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/08/video-mapping-a-dinosaur/ (2016-02-12)
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