archive-org.com » ORG » H » HMNS.ORG

Total: 1158

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Happy New Year! | BEYONDbones
    break their fast on Wednesday Due to early controversy as to which years would have it Muhammad outlawed the 13th month that kept Islamic months tied to the seasons As a result Ramadan and each other month in that calendar begins 11 days earlier each year according to our Gregorian calendar The Moon is Earth s only natural satellite orbiting our planet once every 27 3 days However a cycle of moon phases say from New Moon to the next New Moon takes 29 54 days This is because the Earth itself is moving during each 27 3 day Moon orbit Since it is much easier to observe the Moon s changing phase cycle than to observe the Sun directly the 29 54 day phase cycle was the basis of many ancient calendars Words for moon and month are related in English and are identical in many other languages There is some evidence that our word moon is ultimately related to an Indo European word for measure Given how long we ve measured time by the Moon it is easy to take its presence for granted photo credit pingnews com However our Moon is quite remarkable in several ways Moons in our solar system are generally much smaller than the planet they orbit Jupiter and Saturn for example are about 25 times bigger across than their biggest moons Earth though is only 3 67 times the diameter of our Moon Also moons usually orbit in the same plane as their planet s equator Our Moon though orbits within about 5 degrees of Earth s orbital plane called the ecliptic which is not the plane of the equator since Earth is tilted 23 5 degrees on its axis This leads most astronomers to believe that the Moon did not form with the Earth but is the result of a collision with with an object roughly the size of Mars According to this theory the impactor sometimes called Theia struck a glancing blow on the Earth and was completely destroyed and the Moon formed from the debris of Theia s and Earth s mantles This impact is what left Earth with a Moon much larger than what a planet Earth s size would normally have and left that Moon near Earth s orbital plane where the impact occured Our relatively big moon has crucial effects not only on our tides but also on the stability of Earth s tilt Earth s orbital tilt of about 23 and a half degrees as it goes around the Sun causes the seasons The axis precesses describing an aparent circle roughly every 26 000 years but the amount of tilt obliquity stays nearly the same Because the Moon acts a counterweight the obliquity varies only between 22 1 degrees and 24 5 degrees over about 41 00 years we are now at 23 44 degrees and decreasing Even this orderly variation called the Milankovitch cycle is enough to influence our Ice Ages Imagine the impact on

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/09/happy-new-year-2/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Draw Dinos Right! | BEYONDbones
    s a smaller toe on the inside T rex has a similar hind foot except the inner toe was even smaller Triceratops had a big inner toe The inner toe was used to prop the foot when walking on soft muddy ground And so it looks like Triceratops liked mud better than T rex did Only a few specialized dino herbivores had only the three big toes with no inner toe at all Duck bills are that way That should mean that duck bills avoided soft squishy terrain The toe joints in duck bills show that the hind paws were not flat footed They walked with their heels high off the ground just as big birds today walk Fossils footprints show the same thing All dinos of all species walked and ran in high heels Remember that when you draw a dino No Flat Foots Dino Derby If you re careful about drawing toes and shins you can figure out what dinosaur ran the fastest photo credit Paraflyer Go back to a zoo Draw legs c a r e f u l l y Who has short shins and short ankles Elephants Who has the longest shins and ankles Deer and antelope Who s fastest The deer and antelope It s an anatomical rule To run super fast you need long shins and long thin ankle bones what we call metatarsals Even big heavy critters can be medium fast Draw a rhino and draw an elephant Who s faster Rhinos they can go 33 mph Elephants top out at 23 mph Who has longer ankles Rhinos Who has longer shins ankles a Brachylophosaurus or a T rex The rex it would be faster So would all members of the tyrannosaur family How bout butting heads They re medium fast they have longer shins ankles than a duck bill but shorter than a rex T tops and the other horned dinos have shorter shins and ankles than do duck bills Flex Zee Knees Ski instructors from Austria tell you Flex zee knees Pay attention to knees and ankles Elephants have straight knee and ankles like the ones we humans have That means we can walk long distances with a slow even smooth stride But we re pretty slow photo credit BrianScott Now check out rhinos and buffalo there s a bend at the knee and at the ankle too The bend gives the animal a bounce when it runs and the bounce makes for higher speed Ok let s sketch some dino joints Long Necks sauropods like Diplodocus have elephant type knees and ankles The joints are almost straight But Triceratops and T rex have bent knees and ankles Therefore we can conclude that T tops and the rexes were bouncier and faster than the long necks The butting heads had bent joints too When we pay attention to ankles shins and joint angles we get the results of a dino race Diplodocus is slowest Triceratops and other horned dinos are medium fast Duck bills are faster Butting heads are faster still T rex and other tyrannosaurs are the fastest multi ton dinos For the fastest dino of all check out the ostrich mimics like Struthiomimus They re mid sized only 300 pounds or so But you ll be amazed at the shins and ankles Wide Bodies Duck bills are gutsy Their stomachs and intestines were HUGE The ribs curve outwards very strongly that means the stomach and intestines were bulgy and huge much larger than a tyrannosaur of the same length would have Plus duck bill intestines go further back along the body than almost any other land animal Observe the skeleton of a tyrannosaur The intestines have to end at the pubic bone Since the pubic bone goes straight down from near the hip socket the guts can t go any further back than the hip socket So we have to say that a tyrannosaur was a gut less wonder Duck bills and butting heads and horned dinos pull an anatomical trick they swing the pubic bone backwards so the lower end is way behind the hip socket Now the guts can be enlarged Intestinal chambers can extend very far back Birds do the same trick it s called the bird hipped condition ornithischian condition if you want the technical term Duck bills go to even greater extremes in gut expansion The lower hip bones ischia are made extra long and point backwards The gut can go all the way to the tip of the ischia and so the intestines are even larger than those in a butting head dino or a horned dino Why would duck bills need huge guts To digest tough plants that s why Check it out in a zoo Lions eat meat and lion guts are small because meat is easy to digest Zebras and rhinos eat tough grass and branches and their tummies are big and bulge out Inside the bulgy tummies are chambers with water and micro organisms that make the juices that digest the plants Butting head guts are so large that they must have eaten lots of vegetation every day Swan Necked Duck Bills When I put duck bill neck bones together they didn t go in a straight line front to back Instead the neck had a lovely S curve sort of like what you see in a swan or goose but thicker It turns out that ALL dinosaurs have S shaped necks T rex has a sharp curve Brachylophosaurus has an even sharper curve Triceratops has a gentler curve Remember that when you draw your dino Dinosaur necks come in several strengths super strong strong and weak photo credit Paul J Everett The tyrannosaurs have super strong necks The neck bones are tall and wide and had big prongs to attach the muscles The back of the skull too is tall and wide so the neck muscles that attached here were thick A tyrannosaur could bite down hard

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/09/draw-dinos-right/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Rodents use tools to gather food | BEYONDbones
    Degus have also been used in medical research for diabetes sleep patterns most recently their ability to use tools Before purchasing any new animal we do a lot of research to make sure that they will be a good fit for our programs With that said we knew that our new furry friends would be smart energetic and try to chew through anything We were prepared but after reading articles on how degus were able to use a rake to gather food we were impressed Check it out 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Zoology and tagged animal collection animal tool use animal video animals that use tools caring for animals chew through anything chile Degu degus degus using tools diabetes educational programs HMNS live animal medical research new animal octodon degus rodent rodent uses tools science museum science video sleep patterns video Zoology by Frances Bookmark the permalink About Frances As a museum naturalist Frances teaches wildlife classes presents hands on wildlife outreach programs teaches summer camp and helps care for the live animal collection View all posts by Frances 2 thoughts on Rodents use tools to gather food Jacque on September 29 2008 at 10 09 pm said Does your Degus do tricks like dance for its food That is very interesting to see them in action with the rake I know several animals use tools such as the chimps and bombas i think that spelling is right Frances on September 30 2008 at 11 00 am said Unfortunately neither of our degus dance However they have become more interested in allowing us to hold them if we give them a sunflower seed their favorite treat Also to clarify the degu in the video is not one of ours it was a research degu from Japan

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/09/rodents-use-tools-to-gather-food/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Game Day: Moving a 6-ton fossil | BEYONDbones
    cushioned tractor trailer a crane along with our very own dynamic paleontology staff and outstanding support from supreme moving specialists As Dr Bakker says Moving a fossil is like moving a piece of art In this video we thought we would give you a rare peek of what David Temple calls Game Day moving Leonardo a 77 million year old adult duckbilled dinosaur from our off site facility to the museum Check out the other videos in this series The mummified dinosaur Leonardo too good to be true Mapping a dinosaur with Dr Robert Bakker First in a paleontologist s toolkit glue Or check out our channel on YouTube for even more video 1 0 0 This entry was posted in Paleontology and tagged bob bakker brachylophosaur dinosaur exhibit dinosaur mummy dr robert bakker exhibition hadrosaur hurricane ike leonardo dinosaur mummy csi moving a fossil mummified dinosaur Paleontology paleovideo robert bakker Science science museum video series world premiere by Melodie Bookmark the permalink About Melodie Melodie is a Public Relations Consultant at HMNS View all posts by Melodie 4 thoughts on Game Day Moving a 6 ton fossil Astrid Leriche on September 25 2008 at 10 41 am said Wish I could have been there when they moved the mummy and wish I could visit the exhibition Maybe next year How s Peanut going Already finished nearly finished And is he going to be in the exhibition too Give my regards to my uncle Dirk curator of anthropology Greetings Astrid Erin on September 25 2008 at 2 05 pm said Hi Astrid I sent links to your comments to Dirk I am sure he ll be enjoy seeing that you are reading Peanut has been prepared and placed on display in the Dinosaur Mummy CSI exhibit opening tomorrow 9 26

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/09/game-day-moving-a-6-ton-fossil/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Teachers Cutting Up in the Classroom? | BEYONDbones
    just for big kids anymore We had teachers that teach pre k and teachers that teach high school and everyone left with great hands on experiences and ideas for their classrooms The fun began by learning the anatomical terms you need to know for dissection Check out how teachers learned these tiresome terms in an amazingly fun way What a better way to excite your students than letting them bring a stuffed animal from home to label with fancy science terms Do you know where your posterior is I ll give you a hint I bet your sitting on it right now Then came the pickles Say what Yes pickles Teachers practiced using dissection tools such as scissors scalpels tweezers and probes as they dissected a jumbo pickle Look at what a rockin job this teacher is doing with this pickle Don t laugh I bet you can t find the dorsal side of a pickle Did you know you can dissect a flower All you need is a flower and your bare hands Check out the flower parts this teacher is finding Do you know a petal from a pistil Then things really got juicy no really they did Squids for everyone Teachers got their own squid to dissect as Nicole Temple Director of Youth Education dissected a larger fresh squid from the Asian Market The teachers in this picture look very engaged Hey check out the size of the chromatophores on this squid The teachers finished up the night by quickly dissecting an egg These smart teachers now know their albumen from their chalazae Can you say the same for yourself 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Education and tagged albumen anatomical terms chalazae chromatophores classes for teachers dissect a flower dissect a pickle dissect a

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/09/teachers-cutting-up-in-the-classroom/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Need a break from Ike? Come see Body Worlds 2 | BEYONDbones
    of our amazing bodies Conroe TX One of the most amazing events ever to grace my eyes Gave my children and others a new idea to the concept of being a human Houston TX The cool thing is you get to learn all about how our most important organ the brain functions and copes with illness and disease and explore how brain performance can be enhanced This time around the exhibit incorporates 200 real human body specimens and 20 full body specimens in dramatic life like poses healthy and unhealthy organs body parts and slices all preserved through plastination The Plastination process was invented by Dr Gunther von Hagens the creator of the Body Worlds exhibits During Plastination all bodily fluids and soluble fats are replaced with reactive resins and elastomers such as silicon rubber and epoxy through vacuum forced impregnation After gas and heat the specimens assume rigidity and maintain those infamous life like dramatic poses Here s my list of the must see plastinates at the exhibit The Skateboarder shown above You ll see what happens to your body when engaged in extreme sports and when you push your body to its limit The Drawer Man A unique look inside the complicated body from skin to intestines The Exploding Man The largest display in the exhibit featuring each and every organ The Figure Skaters Shows how elegant the muscles work for fine tuned athletes The exhibit is considerably different than the Body Worlds that came to Houston in 2006 in content and display and is shown on two floors of the museum so its definitely a sight to see Body Worlds 2 is 50 larger than the last showing in Houston and has a detailed display of exactly how the human brain operates After seeing Body Worlds 2

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/09/need-a-break-from-ike-come-see-body-worlds-2/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Before the Hurricane: Securing the HMNS Greenhouses | BEYONDbones
    handicapped ramp Once we had the pupation cage in place we transferred the 600 caterpillars into the cage along with a feast of Passionflower vines for them to feed upon until the storm passed We were so busy doing the transport and removal that our Staff Entomologist Laurie and Soni our Assistant Conservatory Horticulturist came up to the seventh floor to help out by watering the other plants within the greenhouses Nancy our CBC director and Erin our Insect Zoo Manager and Entomologist decided that because they lived close to the museum they would make sure that the little ones housed in the basement would be tended to as soon as they could get into the museum district to do so photo credit Meme In the greenhouse area we spent all day removing all the projectile objects from the exterior wood concrete blocks etc We secured the plastic tables that usually hold plants to the white fence with newly purchased ratchet straps The greenhouse shade screens are set up on a pulley system so we rolled them all down and secured them with the straps Inside the greenhouse we pushed aside the mist tent where we house our seedlings to make way for the 700 plus plants that were outside that had to come inside until the storm passed We also had shelves of thousands of plastic plant flats and thousands of plastic pots which had to be pulled into the greenhouses so that they wouldn t fly all over from the high winds We removed the shade cloth from the exterior so that it would not get ripped up in the wind We also had cans full of Osmocote a timed released fertilizer bone and blood meal perlite vermiculite soil mix and orchid medium that we transported into the greenhouse Whew what a day We left feeling good about having secured the greenhouses and hoped that when we returned that the greenhouses would still be there photo credit geocam20000 As I write this blog there are still millions without electricity or water and lots of recovery is taking place in Houston and in my neighborhood Katy The CBC greenhouses I am happy to say survived the winds and the rain Only one thing happened two of the steel shade clothes decided to roll themselves backwards and ended up on the opposite side of the greenhouse but remained attached to the roof Erin and Nancy cared for our babies in the dark basement with the aid of flashlights and for this I thank them Abraham our groundskeeper filled 55 gallon cans with water and Erin and Nancy hand watered the plants in the greenhouses There was no electricity in the museum until Wednesday afternoon hence no elevator so Abraham had to deliver the water to the seventh floor in the back of his truck Since then we have returned the rearing pairs of longwing butterflies to the insectaries where as of yesterday there was mating and egg laying occurring just

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/09/before-the-hurricane-securing-the-hmns-greenhouses/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sept. Flickr Photo of the Month: Museum Reflected | BEYONDbones
    images in the pool it s always tough to choose This month s pick Museum Reflected by bryan dawson is a striking portrayal of something most people don t examine too closely the globe on the tip of our sundial Here s what bryan dawson had to say about his shot which includes an interesting perspective on composition It was only recently that I even realized that you could take photos in most of the museum It wasn t until one of my Flickr groups Assignment Houston had an assignment at the museum that I even considered taking my camera along I missed the big group gathering you might have seen it mentioned on the HMNS blog as well so I went on my own later I think I drove my fiancee mad since I stopped every few feet to take a photo This particular photo was one of the very last ones I took that day My fiancee wanted to look around the gift shop so I went outside to snap a few The clouds were blocking the sun just enough to send out some tendrils of light It was a beautiful sight but I knew it would look better if there was something in the foreground That s when I noticed that the ball on top of the sundial was mirrored and you could see the museum reflected back in it That was it I lined it up and what you see is the result I tried lots of different post processing on it before deciding upon a monotone coloring I like to think it lets you focus on the composition instead of being distracted by the colors Many thanks to bryan dawson for allowing us to share his beautiful photograph We hope this and all the other

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/09/sept-flickr-photo-of-the-month-museum-reflected/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •