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  • Energy: What’s Next? | BEYONDbones
    of importance for most Americans Whatever it takes to make us examine what is required to produce the energy we crave in this country is good because it causes us to consider our responsibilities to the world today and to future generations Theodore Roosevelt conservationist photo credit sakraft1 Theodore Roosevelt years ahead of his time was an instrumental force in initiating wise conservation of our resources In utilizing and conserving the natural resources of the Nation the one characteristic more essential than any other is foresight The conservation of our natural resources and their proper use constitute the fundamental problem which underlies almost every other problem of our national life Address to the National Editorial Association Jamestown Virginia June 10 1907 The importance of the resources used for the production of energy show that Teddy Roosevelt was especially correct in predicting that conservation of resources would affect every other problem in our lives Check out the full post for more information including criteria for evaluating our options so we can make a smart decision about what comes after oil Check back for Parts 2 and 3 coming soon 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Energy and tagged clair

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/11/energy-whats-next/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Live from the fossil field! | BEYONDbones
    for several years You can read more of what s been found already in our daily blog from the field in 2007 They ve found Dimetrodon the T rex of its day all over the site They ve brought back jacket after jacket of fin spines vertebra columns even skulls of this species for study But and this is the mystery not a whole lot of herbivores So what was Dimetrodon eating The theory put forth by E C Olson is that they were eating Xenacanth freshwater sharks that swam in the shallow seas present in the area during the Permian And the team has found evidence to that effect in the form of chewed up shark skull in the area But they re still after the smoking gun that would prove Olson s theory definitively Twelve or so of our best diggers have made this their mission this week and one of them will be checking in with us every day Today Kat Havens one of our regular bloggers here fills us in on what was found Listen closely it s pretty cool Check back soon more news from the field tomorrow 1 0 0 This entry was posted in Paleontology and tagged blogger bob bakker crime scene investigation daily blog from the field did dimetrodon eat xenacanth dig Dimetrodon dr bakker dr robert bakker E C Olson evidence for theory field science fossil dig fossils herbivore investigate investigation kat havens mystery north texas fossils paleontologist Paleontology paleontology team permian permian mystery podcast robert bakker robert t bakker Science Seymour Shorty Olson study t rex tx what did dimetrodon eat xenacanth by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS In a past life she was a public relations and

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/11/live-from-the-fossil-field/ (2016-02-12)
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  • The Quest for High Bear | BEYONDbones
    are called waniyetu wowapi The Lakota word waniyetu means year which tends to be measured from first snowfall to first snowfall It is often translated as a winter These winter counts were used in conjunction with an extensive oral history Each year was named for an event with the images serving as a reference source that could be consulted regarding the order of the years The events used to name the years were not always the most important things that happened but rather the most memorable One such event The year the stars fell has been identified as the year 1833 when the Leonid meteor storm was visible Information courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian Education Office Lakota dress Buckskin glass beads thread Ca 1870 In its basic form this is a typical dress worn by Plains Indian women It consists of three assembled parts the front the back and the yoke These three pieces give the garment a T shape outline Very likely this dress was made during the winter months when the cold forced people to stay inside and work on clothing This dress is a good example of the great diligence and talent on the part of the women who made it It is estimated that it took 300 000 small glass beads to complete the decoration In February 1934 Ms Olive Dean wore this dress to a costume ball in Washington D C She was awarded the first prize for the most outstanding costume by the two judges Anna Ball Franklin D Roosevelt s daughter and Cornelius Vanderbilt Jr Osage friendship blanket Wool fabric silk ribbon thread Late 19th century These blankets sometimes also referred to as wearing blankets are still being made today In the early 1800s Osage women began to sew mosaic ribbon work patterns around the borders of wool blankets transforming them into extraordinary robes Girls and women wore these robes at weddings and other special events and the ribbon work ranged from relatively simple bands of ribbon work to richly patterned reverse appliqué ribbon work a technique of sewing a cut out ribbon pattern on to a differently colored ribbon background The bold compositions were created by splitting the cut out pattern into two colors and maintaining a strict symmetry Free hanging tabs of ribbon often framed the bottom edge of the robe The blankets were wore around the women s shoulders and positioned over their forearms so that the ribbon work draped as a cascade of color in front of them Despite the extreme fragility of the ribbon to tearing and fraying and its susceptibleness to fading and running Osage women celebrated this art form They also sewed reverse appliqué bands of ribbon on shawls and skirts and at the shoulder of their blouses Today women wear these blankets as important garments that are emblematic of their Osage identity Information courtesy of Eva Fognell Curator Thaw Collection of American Indian Art Fenimore Art Museum Lake Road Cooperstown NY

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/11/the-quest-for-high-bear/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Looking Back…Happy New Year! | BEYONDbones
    that their might be large planets or land masses between Mars and Jupiter based off a theory that is no longer used proposed in 1766 by Johann Daniel Titus It was this same theory that led to the discovery of Uranus in 1781 Because of the theory and the unknown location of a planet between Mars and Jupiter 24 astronomers combined their efforts and began a methodical search for the planet photo credit Venom82 On New Years day 1925 the American astronomer Edwin Hubble announced the discovery of galaxies outside of our own milky way Hubble also later showed that the universe is still expanding On New Years Day 1985 the Internet domain name system was created The domain name system translates human names for sites into the numerical or binary identifiers associated with network equipment A simple explanation is that the Internet domain name system acts as a phone book for the Internet by translating a human friendly host name into an IP address photo credit mackenzienicole On New Year s Day 1995 the existence of freak waves was proven The Draupner oil platform in the north sea was usually hit by large waves measuring about 39 feet in height However on Jan 1st of that year a freak wave that was 89 ft tall crashed down on the platform Freak waves had been thought to exist before based off of stories of sailors but it had never previously been recorded 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged asteroids astronomers Astronomy ceres domain names draupner oil platform draupner wave Edwin Hubble freak waves galaxies Hubble s law internet internet domain name IP addresses johann daniel titus johann elert bode jupiter Mars milky way New Years planets solar system titus bode law uranus by Steven Bookmark

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/12/looking-back-19/ (2016-02-12)
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  • My love affair with the tropics (how and why I became a biologist) | BEYONDbones
    Two senior students Peng Chai and Sue Boinski were already in the park Peng was studying bird predation on butterflies Bo as she was called was the equivalent of a mountain man in my somewhat awed view She had spent the past several years following troupes of squirrel monkeys to learn about their behavior and mating habits sometimes staying in the park for over a year at a stretch In the course of her wanderings she had dodged fer de lance and bushmaster snakes and had some very shaky video footage of a pair of jaguars lazily playing together oblivious of their nervous human watcher Fruits of the Corcovado rainforest Photo by Dr Larry Gilbert The Sirena station was a bustling place Since in those days before the gold miner crisis of 1985 it served as the park headquarters it was the central point in Corcovado for communications and supplies which were all brought in by plane The park director was stationed here along with about 5 6 park guards Other park guards travelling by horseback from the outlying stations came in to pick up their allotment of supplies or to rotate out for a week s holiday The radio crackled all day long Sierra Papa Norte Dos a Sierra Papa Norte National Park Service station 2 to headquarters I learned all sorts of things in radio lingo Cambio meant over Dos meant good Dos y medio was so so Tres meant bad un 22 was a telephone call 10 was crazy etc The station in those days was rustic Electricity was provided by generator only at lunchtime and for a couple hours in the evening Running water was ingeniously piped in from a nearby stream Course participants and park guards all ate together in a little open sided building generous portions of rice and beans smaller portions of meat and vegetables inventive desserts and drinks made from fresh tropical fruits all deliciously prepared by Maria the feisty and attractive cook Buttress of a tropical giant Photo by Dr Larry Gilbert The first few days Larry led his students and me on long sometimes wild walks through the forest up over the steep knife edged ridges crashing down through stream beds slogging along the beach or sweltering through open areas What an amazing place I was in love with the forest from the moment I saw it So many plants so many insects birds monkeys frogs snakes etc But especially plants It was like being in the most amazing botanical garden Here things I d only seen as houseplants grew rampantly everywhere Ferns were not just ferns but trees And trees with their huge buttresses as big around as a house towered into the canopy Squirrel Monkies are common near Sirena After a week or so of our introductory walks the students settled down to their research projects Since I wasn t a student and didn t have my own project I helped some of the others where I could

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/12/my-love-affair-with-the-tropics-how-and-why-i-became-a-biologist/ (2016-02-12)
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  • ‘Tis the Season… | BEYONDbones
    and all of us in the Collections Department are most appreciative of our generous donors However these are the most recent acquisitions The Houston Museum of Natural Science wouldn t be where it is today without nearly a century of far sighted people who generously and intelligently gave entire collections of natural specimens and cultural artifacts They entrusted things they had collected with passion and zeal to a museum that was just beginning to grow so that Houstonians could learn about the natural world around them In the coming year of 2009 as the museum celebrates its centennial you ll hear more about the names of Attwater Westheimer Milsaps McDannald but their generosity was the foundation of the museum s collections A spectacular mineral specimen in the HMNS collection photo credit Lori Greig And that s what it takes generosity I wonder what our past donors would think of today s natural history auction market Fossils and minerals can fetch exorbitant prices far more than most museums can ever pay Would those long ago donors who thought so highly of museums as institutions for the public approve of specimens and artifacts staying in the private hands of the highest bidder After all these early naturalists amateur and professional were often wealthy and acute businessmen themselves But they did give and the museum has been fortunate that that kind of generosity has prevailed for a century Indeed it continues today and our collections continue to grow So I ll continue to measure and count amazing artifacts and specimens and make sure each donor is properly acknowledged It s just my small part in witnessing how the thoughtful generosity of our donors makes the museum a better place for us all 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/12/tis-the-season/ (2016-02-12)
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  • The More Things Change, The More They Stay The Same | BEYONDbones
    operation into Germany Not so any more apparently Recent reports out of Germany indicate that some time between A D 180 260 there was a major battle fought between Roman troops and Germanic tribes The newly uncovered battlefield near Kalefeld Oldenrode is located south of Hanover Coins weapons and other military gear were retrieved from an area one mile long and a third of a mile wide Interestingly among the artifacts encountered was a Roman horse sandal or hipposandal in technical lingo You read this right a horse sandal not a horse shoe photo credit joiseyshowaa In all of this I see parallels to our current situation related to the border between the US and Mexico What now constitutes the border area was first inhabited by American Indian peoples later incorporated into Mexico and ultimately made part of the US either by force of arms or by purchase Along large stretches of this border a fence is going up One of the goals is to control who crosses the border and to safeguard life and property on this side of the fence All of this echoes sentiments expressed almost two millennia ago With regards to the Roman situation we have the benefit of hindsight we know how that story ended With regards to the current situation who knows Future historians will have the privilege of assessing that scenario Of one thing I am certain future archaeologists will not be finding any horse sandals along the Rio Grande 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Anthropology and tagged american indian American Indians Anthropology archaeologists archaeology Are we rome Augustus border crossings border fence border patrols Caesaur conquest of Gaul conquet of gaul Dacia Danube emperor empire expansion fronteir Gaul hipposandal historians horse sandal julius caesar Kalefeld Oldenrode legions mexico new

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/12/the-more-things-change-the-more-the-stay-the-same-2/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Looking Back…Christmas Edition | BEYONDbones
    web went public on August 6 1991 less than a year later Less than 20 years later we have billions of websites on every topic imaginable and most youths can t imagine their lives without the internet superhighway And now for the history On Christmas Day 1991 Mikhail Gorbachev resigned as the President of the Soviet Union The very next day Ukraine left the Soviet Union and the Union collapsed This ended the Cold War that had existed between the US and the Soviet Union since the mid 1940s On Christmas Day 1977 Prime Minister of Israel Menachem Begin met with Anwar Sadat the President of Egypt to discuss a peace treaty between their two countries The two neighboring states had been fighting on and off since the formation of Israel in 1948 On March 26 1979 the two countries announced a peace treaty that still exists today The two leaders also received the Nobel Peace Prize photo credit khyes On Christmas Day 1914 German and British troops on the Western Front of World War I called a temporary cease fire Against the orders of their superiors all artillery fire stopped along the line The truce had started in some places the night before as German troops began decorating their trenches and singing Christmas carols in German The Scottish troops across the battlefield responded by singing carols in English Soon troops began to leave the trenches and to socialize in the area between the two sides exchanging drinks and cigars In one area the troops met outside the trenches and began a game of soccer it is rumored the Germans won 3 2 In some places along the lines the fighting resumed the next day but in others the truce lasted until after the New Year Although the war saw

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2008/12/looking-backchristmas-edition/ (2016-02-12)
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