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  • Darwin2009: An “Aha!” moment worth celebrating | BEYONDbones
    fotos con su tamaño original Darwin was invited to be part of the second voyage of the HMS Beagle It appears it was a last minute invitation Here I could segue into what constitutes a what if moment but I won t During his five year long trip Darwin spent most of his time on land a good thing for a person prone to sickness and a good thing for us too as he was able to collect a lot of samples and make copious notes This trip which took him around the world lasted from 27 December 1831 to 2 October 1836 Even though he was able to collect lots of data it also appears that he was not until he was back home and reviewing his materials that the aha moment came When studying rare Galapagos mockingbirds Darwin started considering the notion that that species changed over time In other words Darwin started to think of what we call evolution The mocking birds are currently part of an exhibit at the Natural History Museum in London It was not until 1859 after further research and after much prodding from third parties that Darwin finally published his famous tome On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection It has been a bestseller ever since This year marks the 200th anniversary of Darwin s birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of his famous book These two dates are celebrated across the world although in the United States Darwin will have to share birthday cake with a fellow called Lincoln who happened to have the same birth day In Houston activities surrounding Darwin his work and influence will be coordinated through the Houston Darwin 2009 organization A host of Houston based institutions participate including the Houston Museum

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/darwin2009-an-aha-moment-worth-celebrating/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Queen Alexandra’s Birdwing | BEYONDbones
    the world reaching wingspans of more than 14 inches Males are smaller but more beautifully colored than females they have iridescent green and blue markings and a bright yellow abdomen while females have brown wings with white markings and a cream colored abdomen Birdwings are members of the swallowtail family Papilionidae The Queen Alexandra s Birdwing is highly endangered and along with several other birdwing butterfly species was placed on the Appendix I CITES list in 1977 collecting or trading wild caught CITES I species is prohibited by international agreement Our specimens were acquired before they were officially protected Today the museum would be unable to obtain this or several of the other birdwing species we have in our insect collection Learn more about butterflies and their relatives in a visit to the new Brown Hall of Entomology a part of the Cockrell Butterfly Center a living walk through rainforest at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see larger and more detailed images of this rare specimen as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the photo gallery on hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged 100 years 100 objects artifact butterflies Butterfly centennial collections Cracid Cracid Specialist Group culture endangered species HMNS insects largest butterflies Papilionidae photo photo gallery preserving objects queen alexandra queen alexandra s birdwings rare animal rare butterflies Science swallowtail butterflies tradition by Nancy Bookmark the permalink About Nancy Nancy is Director of the Cockrell Butterfly Center and curator of entomology A plant ecologist by training she specializes in the interaction between insects especially butterflies and plants The tropics are her favorite habitat and she heads south to Central and South America whenever possible View all posts by Nancy 4 thoughts on 100

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/100-years-100-objects-queen-alexandras-birdwing/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Making Baby Bearded Dragons | BEYONDbones
    and collard greens of course the crickets were presented to her with a nice coat of calcium for the mother to be Then last week the discovery was made After a long night it must have been Monster had created a mountain from her compost on top of her heat rock and was playing king of the mountain just about all morning It wasn t until she got a superworm treat that she would inch away from her mountain My work began Karen Fritz marking the eggs Carefully sifting through the compost a little at a time I was in search of the mother load a nest of beardie eggs Monster s first clutch Totally amazed that not an egg was found I started to think that she didn t look so much like a Portobello mushroom there were no eggs maybe my imagination just got the best of me The Princess was so lethargic I started to worry that maybe she was sick After watching her all day I felt better when she had a healthy appetite I decided to start sifting some of the mulch out of her habitat as ingesting any of this could be very harmful to her As I cleaned her aquarium I lifted her large heat rock and the discovery was made We hit the jackpot with 24 small marshmallow size beardie eggs It is truly amazing that this little lizard knew just what to do to keep her clutch warm I cannot even imagine how she was able to dig out the dirt under her heat rock to lay 24 eggs without crushing them Nature is amazing How did this little Princess lay 24 eggs Well from the Internet I discovered it was not at all uncommon for a Bearded Dragon to lay up to 30 50 eggs in a clutch But the female wouldn t necessarily lay all of the eggs at one time She could choose to lay a couple of eggs one week one or two a week later and as the process continues it could be months before the whole clutch was laid Dang that meant I would be spending quite a time of the Christmas holiday egg sitting in the Volunteer Office at HMNS Lucky for me and I m sure happily for her Monster laid all 24 eggs during one evening after hours probably while the music played and laughter was heard during holiday celebrations taking place through out the exhibit halls up above The eggs with black lines to mark their original positions You might notice black lines imprinted along the length of each egg from top to bottom The lines were introduced by Karen Fritz my Volunteer Office co partner in crime who has a smooth and steady hand and a good sharpie I learned of this process from me earlier research It is extremely important to not rotate or change the position of the eggs while moving them After carefully uncovering the eggs Karen

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/making-baby-bearded-dragons/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Blue-billed Curassow | BEYONDbones
    one for each year of our history Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days The endangered Blue billed Curassow one of the 100 objects we ve chosen to celebrate the Museum s centennial This description is from Dan the museum s curator of vertebrate zoology He s chosen a selection of objects that represent the most fascinating animals in the Museum s collections that we ll be sharing here and on hmns org throughout the year The Blue billed Curassow Crax alberti is a large bird that is endemic to the mountain valleys of northern Colombia The tasty flesh of this turkey sized bird combined with destruction of the rainforests it thrives in represent the primary threats to this and other members of the Cracid family This species is considered Critically Endangered by the Cracid Specialist Group as its global population certainly can not exceed 2000 individuals It is certainly among the rarest of vertebrates in the collection You can see larger and more detailed images of this rare specimen as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the photo gallery on hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Zoology and tagged 100 years 100 objects artifact blue billed curassow centennial collections Cracid Cracid Specialist Group culture curassow endangered species HMNS photo photo gallery preserving objects rare animal rare bird Science tradition tropical bird by Dan Bookmark the permalink About Dan As curator of vertebrate zoology Dr Brooks has more backbone s than anyone at the Museum He is recognized internationally as the authority on Cracids the most threatened family of birds in the Americas With an active research

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/100-years-100-objects-blue-billed-curassow/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Your Friend: The Roach | BEYONDbones
    them though not frequently This is not because humans don t like to eat bugs but rather because of the particular taste of roaches which is similar to ammonia If you ever do decide to partake know that they have three times as much protein as chicken Roaches are also good pollinators In fact the first pollinators were beetles not bees They are also the most frequently used speciments in the study of insect behavior anatomy and physiology So in review if you DON T like being waste high in debris but you DO like growing plants and eating you must love the roach 0 0 1 This entry was posted in Plants Insects and tagged ammonia bees cockroach detritus Education HMNS insect insects man s best friend plants pollen pollinators roach by Nicole Bookmark the permalink About Nicole Nicole has worked for HMNS in some capacity since 1996 whether part time full time or as a volunteer She taught for seven years in public school including four years in Fort Bend and a short stint overseas While she never taught science she was always the teacher called when someone needed to remove a swarm of bees catch a snake in the playground or get the bat off the ceiling of the cafeteria View all posts by Nicole 2 thoughts on Your Friend The Roach Nancy on January 12 2009 at 10 05 am said Hey Nicole thanks for extolling the virtues of one of my favorite creatures the oft maligned and much misunderstood cockroach But a question You say that in fact the first pollinators were beetles not bees That may be true but what do beetles have to do with cockroaches Beetles are advanced insects with complete metamorphosis they first appeared about 265 mya Cockroaches are one of

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/your-friend-the-roach/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Baby Cradle | BEYONDbones
    behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days A Native American baby cradle one of the 100 objects we ve chosen to celebrate our centennial This description is from Dirk the museum s curator of anthropology He s chosen a selection of objects that represent human cultures throughout time and around the world that we ll be sharing here and on hmns org throughout the year Baby cradles are almost universal objects with a history going back centuries The museum has quite a few in its collections from different parts of the world In this case we are dealing with a late 20th century example from the subarctic regions of North America It serves as a very colorful reminder that this tradition still continues You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the photo gallery on hmns org Explore thousands of years of Native American history in the John P McGovern Hall of the Americas a permanent exhibition at the Houston Museum of Natural Science 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Anthropology and tagged

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/100-years-100-objects-baby-cradle/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum Educators Open House — January 24th is just around the corner! | BEYONDbones
    Downtown Aquarium FotoFest Houston Arboretum and Nature Center Houston Computer Museum Houston Gem and Mineral Society Houston Zoo The John C Freeman Weather Museum Moody Gardens and the Orange Show Center for Visionary Art The Children s Museum of Houston The Health Museum Holocaust Museum Houston and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston will also be participating as MEOH hosts for the other 16 participating organizations Houston area educators school administrators home school educators and student teachers are invited to discover the fascinating exhibitions programs and educational resources available for their students This event is completely FREE for all educators and for educators who attend at least 3 or more presentations are eligible for 3 hours of Continuing Education Credit all you have to do is register online Go to the Museum District homepage to register for MEOH 2009 today 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Education and tagged Battleship Texas bayou preservation association childrens museum of Houston continuing education CPE downtown aquarium Education Educators Educators Open House fotofest health museum HMNS houston aquarium houston arboretum houston computer museum houston gem and mineral society houston holocaust musem Houston museum district Houston Museums houston weather museum houston zoo January

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/museum-educators-open-house-january-24th-is-just-around-the-corner/ (2016-02-12)
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  • The Earth’s First Apocalypse: Texas Red Beds, 285 Million Years Ago | BEYONDbones
    Texas Red Beds 285 Million Years Ago Will Baird on January 8 2009 at 12 27 pm said First apocalypse is a little misleading wouldn t you say The Devonian Ordovician Cambrian and Vendian Ediacarian extinctions might feel a little ignored James Krefft on January 12 2009 at 8 34 pm said I found the disease theory well argued and a refreshing bit of air in a stuffy area Admitedly Paleontology is but a hobby however I too have had doubts about the Duke Nuke Em ending to the Dinos A few thoughts A disease epidemic can often kill off over 90 of a large land species Deer for example often lose over 95 of a herd to a particularly mean pest Moreover the initial disease is only the start If a huge of a species is killed subsequent generations are far harder to sire due to the decreased number of breeding pairs Moreover over time genetic degredation comes into play as the survivors of a disease epidemic end up suffering from inbreeding Anyway great idea Doc Vlad Basard on February 27 2009 at 3 38 am said I agree somewhat with James Krefft in his post but personally I think were looking to hard and to close for the answer Perhaps metaphorically speaking we are looking through a microscope when we should be looking through a satellite Now I know most of you will want to blow this off but please take the time to think this through before you make a judgment And I do hope Bob reads these as I would like to hear his opinions on this theory As bob said the Dinosaurs were already suffering a decline by the time of the KT boundary but I think the asteroid played a deciding factor in the ultimate outcome When the asteroid hit it would have made it significantly harder for the dino s to recover but if the asteroids also caused some other side effects one I think hasten been examined yet then we can see the current outcome Increase in volcanism earthquakes tidelwaves etc the normal stuff we have already heard But what if when the asteroid hit it changed the earth s gravity Now stop and think about that animals that were known to be larger started shrinking in size Forced evolution life adapts to its environment as long as something doesn t kill it I e that which does not kill us makes us stronger Coupled with that and disease It s no wonder they died out Or should I say evolved out Bob I would love to hear your opinion Jan SNOEP on March 2 2009 at 3 26 am said I have many arguments claiming that red beds are not continental but representing periods of gigantic tides There is abundant proof that red coloring occurred many MY after sdimentation All red bed periods showed mass extinctions Recent research MIT demonstrates the occurrence of strong eccentric moon orbits in the past Most

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/the-earths-first-apocalypse-texas-red-beds-285-million-years-ago/ (2016-02-12)
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