archive-org.com » ORG » H » HMNS.ORG

Total: 1158

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Vote for your favorite Houston Museum | BEYONDbones
    of the museum is devoted for exhibit space I do realize and I know you do of course that the one thing restraining HMNS is the space limitation and the new wing should help a lot How big is the new wing planned to be The Intern on January 7 2009 at 10 41 pm said I voted for HMNS too But maybe I m a little biased as well Erin B on January 8 2009 at 8 20 am said Stephen I m definitely a museum person so if it s a museum I tend to love it The American and The Brooklyn Museum in New York are amazing But I also love the little museum in Malta where our Leonardo dinosaur is from I am not sure how much square footage is devoted to exhibit space and it changes as we have rotating exhibitions fill or vacate certain spaces But you re right the new wing will vastly expand this area Since plans are still in the works I can t say by specifically how much at this point Stephen on January 8 2009 at 8 53 pm said Could you please try to find some kind of information about the size of the museum right now whether exhibit space or just total square footage of all facilities Erin B on January 9 2009 at 9 55 am said I do have information on total square footage The total museum size is currently around 240 000 square feet This includes our exhibit space theaters classrooms offices and collection space Amanda on January 10 2009 at 1 35 pm said I voted for HMNS because it is the best museum in the world I saw this article http www telegraph co uk culture art 4209236 Tom Campbell director of

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/vote-for-your-favorite-houston-museum/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Poaching and the extinction of the African Elephant | BEYONDbones
    to Africa to investigate elephant issues first hand interviewing experts from South Africa to Kenya I learned that ivory has been valued since the Ice Age when humans carved figurines from the tusks of the woolly mammoth the ancestor of the modern elephant 35 000 years ago Even then humans were attracted to ivory s beauty and scarcity and its ability to be finely carved photo credit unforth Throughout history nearly every culture from ancient Egypt to the US used it to make small sculptures furniture combs chessmen and hundreds of other objects a list that later included pistol grips piano keys and billiard balls By the late 1800s ivory was the plastic of its age Demand helped drive the slaughter of elephants whose tusks were brought to the African coasts on the shoulders of slaves By the 1980s organized poaching often carried out with AK 47s halved the African elephant population causing world wide outrage that led to an international agreement under CITES the convention on trade in endangered species banning cross border trade in ivory But the ivory ban has failed to stop poaching In Ivory s Ghosts I look into the reasons behind that One is that the long standing demand for ivory is not likely to disappear at least anytime soon The attraction to ivory is simply too ingrained in too many cultures And poaching not surprisingly flourishes in countries that lack adequate enforcement or are torn apart by war like the Democratic Republic of Congo In the absence of a legal market to meet age old demand the black market for ivory is flourishing Now some conservationists are starting to think what was previously unthinkable returning to a highly controlled ivory trade one that s structured to help not hurt elephants After all as long as there are elephants there will be ivory Today tusks are routinely recovered from elephants that die of natural causes and stockpiled in the warehouses of wildlife departments and park services in dozens of African countries What should be done with all this valuable white gold Cash strapped African nations are not about to destroy it Instead they have twice successfully petitioned CITES to be allowed to sell their legitimate ivory caches to raise funds strictly for elephant conservation The last time was this past October when Namibia Botswana Zimbabwe and South Africa sold over 100 tons of tusks raising 15 million from CITES approved buyers Japan and China who agreed not to re export any ivory products photo credit BrianScott The reason these countries gained approval for this sale was that they have well managed elephant populations and control poaching In fact Botswana and South Africa actually have too many elephants for the habitat available to them Officials in South Africa s Kruger National Park may even have to resort to culling some of their elephants if they can t find other ways to keep their fast growing herds within bounds It s a situation that strikes many elephant

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/poaching-and-the-extinction-of-the-african-elephant/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Go Stargazing! January Edition | BEYONDbones
    our side of the Sun and will pass us in March Therefore Venus which outshines everything in the sky except the Sun and the Moon is getting even brighter this month as it approaches us Saturn is now high in the southwest at dawn It will be rising in the east in late evening by month s end Mars remains lost in the Sun s glare this month photo credit Libertinus Facing north you ll see five stars in a distinct M like shape this is Cassiopeia the Queen Her stars are about as bright as those in the Big Dipper and she is directly across the North Star from that Dipper In fall and early winter while the Dipper is low and out of sight Cassiopeia rides high Dazzling Orion rises in the east reminding us that winter is on the way His belt points up to Aldebaran the eye of Taurus the Bull The Dog Stars Sirius and Procyon are below Orion in the east Sirius is the brightest star we ever see at night To Orion s left as he rises are two stars of similar brightness less than five degrees apart These are Castor and Pollux marking the heads of Gemini the Twins Moon Phases in January 2009 1st Quarter January 4 5 55 am Full Moon January 10 9 27 pm Last Quarter January 17 8 46 pm New Moon January 26 1 55 am photo credit luc viatour The New Moon of January 26 blocks the Sun and thus causes an eclipse of the Sun The eclipse happens when it s nighttime here though only those around the Indian Ocean see a partial eclipse What s more the Moon is near apogee farthest distance from Earth and appears slightly smaller in the sky Therefore it can t block the Sun completely and people directly in the eclipse path see a small ring of the Sun around the Moon at maximum eclipse This type of partial eclipse is an annular eclipse The path of annularity is over the southern Indian Ocean it does not touch land until it reaches Indonesia That same New Moon is also the second New Moon following the winter solstice Accordingly it marks the Chinese New Year The Year of the Rat becomes the Year of the Ox on this date Earth makes its closest approach to the Sun called perihelion at about 6pm on Saturday January 3 The Earth is about 98 of its average distance from the Sun about 93 million miles Aphelion is on July 3 when Earth will be at 101 6 of its average distance from the Sun This is not enough of a distance to affect our seasons photo credit Chris Gin The latest sunrise of the year occurs on the morning of January 10 We are still close enough to the winter solstice that the Sun s apparent path across the sky on January 10 is only slightly higher than on December 21 Meanwhile

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/go-stargazing-january-edition/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dec. Flickr Photo of the Month: Museum of Natural Science | BEYONDbones
    than ideal lighting conditions and playing with some of the exposure settings on my new Sony Alpha A100 camera The fact that the picture came out so good was 99 luck It was one of the best ones of the day Museum of Natural Science by wheelcipher You can see more of his photos on his blog So what s this Photo of the Month feature all about Our science museum is lucky enough to have talented and enthusiastic people who visit us every day wandering our halls grounds and satellite facilities capturing images of the wonders on display here that rival the beauty of the subjects themselves Thankfully many share their photos with us and everyone else in our HMNS Flickr group and we re posting our favorites here on the Museum s blog once a month You can check out all our previous picks here or here Many thanks to wheelcipher for allowing us to share his beautiful photograph We hope this and all the other amazing photography in our group on Flickr will inspire you to bring a camera along next time you re here and show us what you see 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged flickr Flickr photo of the month hall of the americas HMNS mask mystery native american cultures photo of the month photography photosteam Science by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS In a past life she was a public relations and online marketing dynamo at HMNS View all posts by Erin B 2 thoughts on Dec Flickr Photo of the Month Museum of Natural Science Dave on January 6 2009 at 11 23 pm said Stunning photo Erin do you know what the top 10

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/dec-flickr-photo-of-the-month-museum-of-natural-science/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Scientists Play an Inspirational Role | BEYONDbones
    physics for developing a method to trap atoms with laser light As a scientist he can bring to the office an understanding of energy and a commitment to alternative energy concepts beyond politics and economics The Wiess Energy Hall plays an inspirational role in the formation of young scientists in the Houston area The Wiess Energy Hall also catalyses interactions between young scientists and existing scientists from local research organizations Hydrogen Fuel Cell One great example is the work of Dr Peter Strasser Assistant Professor Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering University of Houston Dr Strasser s research on clean hydrogen fuel cell technology was recently chosen as the highlight for 2008 in the Energy for Sustainability Engineering section for a grant received by the National Science Foundation His research is aimed at developing a new way to get fuel hydrogen out of the air Currently hydrogen fuel cell technology is expensive This new reaction makes it more cost effective By putting non noble transition metals with a platinum catalyst the new oxygen reducing reaction is more efficient Part of Dr Strasser s grant included a learning component where he brought middle school students to the Wiess Energy Hall in order to help them learn more about sustainable energy technologies Pictured below are Lisa White Rebecca Scheers April Bievenour Dr Strasser and Neil Manchon These students were attending West Briar Middle School at the time Just as Steven Chu was influenced by other scientists these students are learning from Dt Strasser that science is fun and exciting 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Energy and tagged alternative energy Barack Obama biomolecular engineering clean energy clean hydrogen Energy HMNS hydrogen fuel cell energy National Science Foundation Nobel Prize nobel prize in physics obama Peter Strasser physics Presidential cabinet Secretart

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/scientists-play-an-inspirational-role/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Accession Ledger | BEYONDbones
    are recorded or registered Accession Ledger 1 for the Houston Museum of Natural History Beginning in 1929 Mr Valentine Gesner the Museum s first curator recorded each item which belonged to the museum His initial work involved recording the backlog of objects which had been collected or given to the Museum beginning in 1909 Once this was completed he began listing all of the new donations to the Museum Each record includes the name of the item where it came from and who gave it It also lists the date it was entered into the collection and the number of the gift and lastly the individual catalogue number assigned to the object The catalogue number was also written directly on the object in India ink so that the information would not be lost As you can see from the writing across the top when Mr Gesner began his work the Museum went by the name Houston Museum of Natural History The cover of Accession Ledger 1 These early record books are special based on the information they contain but they also stand as a record of the hard work of Museum employees over the years the people who cared for the same objects that we continue to care for today From their writing it s easy to imagine that you know them that you can learn a little bit about their personalities from their writing The early recorders like Mr Gesner wrote with a fountain pen and had very fancy writing you can tell that penmanship was important and also see that penmanship and writing styles changed over the years In the 1950s employees began to write with ball point pens in the late 1970s they printed with drafting pens From 1929 1993 everything in the museum s permanent collections

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/100-years-100-objects-accession-ledger/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Book List: The forecast calls for reading | BEYONDbones
    love with him because he made her laugh Kevin an actor and Theresa have three grown sons and three grandchildren I first met Theresa fourteen years ago when she visited the middle school where I was the librarian to talk to the students From the time she walked in the door I felt that we had known each other forever I have not seen Theresa for several years but if she popped in today we would take up exactly where we left off Theresa talked to the students about the importance of writing about what you know She showed them spiral notebooks where she wrote down this and that words and ideas that would later become parts of a book Students were just as drawn to Theresa as the teachers were because of her genuine enthusiasm for just about everything When she talked about Devil Storm Theresa told the students that the book is the result of stories her mother told The Nelson family would vacation on Bolivar Peninsula each year and inevitably it would rain Can you imagine trying to entertain 11 children indoors before the days of cable TV and video games Storytelling was the answer and so Tom the Tramp entered Theresa s life Devil Storm is the story of the Richard Carroll family who lived and farmed watermelons on Bolivar Peninsula in 1900 In addition to Richard and Lillie Carroll the family consisted of Walter 13 Alice 9 and baby Emily 1 Another brother William died of the summer sickness just before Emily s birth photo credit Derek Purdy One summer night Alice convinced Walter to walk to the Gulf to see the magical moonwater and their lives changed when they spotted a campfire on the beach Soon afterwards the children learned that Tom the Tramp had returned Tom a former slave was rumored to be the son of the pirate Jean Lafitte He carried a shovel and an old sackful of secrets Tom told the children he had been born in the middle of a herrycane Devil storm outa the Gulf and he would die when the Devil makes another herrycane that will carry everyone off As the story progressed you learn about life on Bolivar in 1900 In early September Richard Carroll not knowing a storm was coming took a load of watermelons to Galveston His plan was to spend the night with relatives before returning to Bolivar the next day The next morning however he learned that until the current storm passed he would be unable to return home Lillie and her children were trying to ride out the storm in their house when Tom showed up and warned them Ain t nothing gonna be alive where we re standin this time tomorrow Lillie however refused to leave so Tom headed for High Island the highest point on Bolivar Peninsula As he walked through the storm Tom thought of losing his own family and decided to make another attempt at saving the Carrolls

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/book-list-reading-is-in-the-forecast/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Celebrating 100: A Centennial of Science | BEYONDbones
    to experience the natural world through exceptional permanent galleries such as the Wiess Energy Hall and the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals as well as unparalleled world premiere exhibitions bringing the earth s wonders to Houston including the recent offerings Lucy s Legacy The Hidden Treasures of Ethiopia and The Birth of Christianity A Jewish Story both of which were organized by HMNS Even as we commemorate the Museum s rich past we continue to look to the future Our satellite locations have extended the Museum s educational programs into The Woodlands 2007 and coming in 2009 Sugar Land Additionally with our capital campaign Building on a Second Century of Science we re planning the launch of a major expansion that will double the Museum s size in Hermann Park This year celebrate our centennial at one hundred fun family events planned throughout 2009 and get an inside look at the Museum s vast collections we ve selected a hundred of the most compelling objects from millions of possibilities and we ll be posting photos and descriptions here as well as on our main web site at www hmns org Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image of a new object every few days 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged 100 years in Houston 100 years of science birth of christianity building on a second century of science burke baker planetarium celebrating 100 centennial challenger learning center Cockrell Butterfly Center Education george observatory history HMNS Lucy exhibit mission natural science science education wortham imax theatre by Joel Bookmark the permalink About Joel Not only is Joel the President of the Museum he s also a curator He has the rare distinction of having held almost every job here including security guard back before his museum career took him to distinguished posts all across the country At HMNS he built our outstanding collection of gems and minerals and the world renowned Wiess Energy Hall before being appointed President in July 2004 Since he s brought us Lucy Leonardo and check back here for his updates on the next big things coming up View all posts by Joel 6 thoughts on Celebrating 100 A Centennial of Science Stephen Campbell on January 1 2009 at 9 14 pm said Does HMNS ever organize exhibits from their own collections All the Lucy Birth of Christianity Body Worlds Titanic Kremlin Forbidden City Dead Sea Scrolls exhibits are great HMNS brings in 2 3 million each year and is one of the most heavily attended museums in the nation and I was just wondering if any major portions of special exhibits are based off its own collections Erin B on January 3 2009 at 11 46 pm said I m so glad you have liked our recent exhibitions Yes the museum does contribute artifacts from our collections to our special exhibitions the current Dinosaur Mummy CSI

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/01/celebrating-100-a-centennial-of-science/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •