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  • Genghis Khan Invades HMNS – This Friday | BEYONDbones
    no region So excellent a lord in all things He lacked nothing that belonged to a king As of the sect of which he was born He kept his law to which he was sworn And thereto he was hardy wise and rich And piteous and just always liked Soothe of his word benign and honorable Of his courage as any center stable Young fresh and strong in arms desirous As any bachelor of all his house A fair person he was and fortunate And kept always so well royal estate That there was nowhere such another man This noble king this Tartar Genghis Khan Compare this admiring portrayal to Genghis Khan in modern OK 80 s pop culture Or what we think we all know of him as the cunning barbarian who spread terror across Asia In reality Genghis Khan was also the brilliant architect of one of history s most advanced civilizations Though he was raised in a climate of brutal tribal warfare he forbade looting and torture Though unable to read he gave his people a written language and a sophisticated society with fair taxation free trade stable government and freedom of religion and the arts Now you can discover the real Genghis in our newest special exhibition opening Friday the largest ever presentation of 13th century treasures related to his life More than 200 spectacular artifacts will be on display including the first ever printing press and paper money imperial gold silk robes and sophisticated weaponry of the world s most visionary ruler and his descendants Plus we re giving away cool stuff Check out the exhibition web site for details on how to enter the Conquer Your Fears giveaway and learn more about exhibition related events Hope to see you there 0 0 0 This

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/genghis-khan-invades-hmns-this-friday/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Giant Longhorn Beetle | BEYONDbones
    which includes over 20 000 species worldwide The family s common name describes the very long antennae characteristic of most cerambycids in some species over twice as long as the body Male cerambycids typically have longer antennae than females of the same species Shown here are a male wings spread longer antennae relative to body size and female larger with somewhat shorter antennae Learn more about beetles and their relatives in a visit to the Brown Hall of Entomology a part of the Cockrell Butterfly Center a living walk through rainforest at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the photo gallery on hmns org 1 0 0 This entry was posted in Plants Insects and tagged 100 years 100 objects african goliath beetle artifact beetle butterflies Butterfly centennial Cerambycidae collections endangered entomology greek mythology HMNS longhorn beetle photo photo gallery preserving objects scarab Science tiats tradition by Nancy Bookmark the permalink About Nancy Nancy is Director of the Cockrell Butterfly Center and curator of entomology A plant ecologist by training she specializes in the interaction between insects especially butterflies and plants The tropics are her favorite habitat and she heads south to Central and South America whenever possible View all posts by Nancy 6 thoughts on 100 Years 100 Objects Giant Longhorn Beetle Kenny on September 26 2009 at 4 58 am said I have just caught one in my backyard in Reno Nv I believe anyway It looks just like the one in the picture but mine has more jagged antennae and almost 2 inches long I kinda want to keep it Should I Nancy on September 28 2009 at 12 15 pm said Hello Kenny How cool that you found a longhorn beetle in your backyard in Reno my cousin lives there nice place I d love to see a photo if you want to send me one ngreig hmns org maybe I can identify it for you There is nothing wrong with keeping it if that s what you want to do Is it dead If it is alive and you want to keep it alive try giving it a piece of apple or banana If it is already dead you may want to pin it or put it in a Riker mount for display You can get insect pins and or a Riker mount from BioQuip I think it s http www bioquip com or you could make your own display box Feel free to send any more questions Mary on August 20 2010 at 5 59 pm said We found a longhorn beetle similar to this in Ogden Utah See http hubandfamily com beetle utah jpg for a photo of the beetle We let the beetle loose but are curious as to what kind it is Erin M on August 23 2010 at 11 38 am said Hi Mary This is a cool

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/100-years-100-objects-giant-longhorn-beetle/ (2016-02-12)
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  • This month, see a ‘Hairy Star!’ | BEYONDbones
    a perfect circle while 1 is a parabola Lulin has an eccentricity of 0 9999948 almost 1 This indicates an orbit so oblong that Lulin won t return to the inner solar system for about 50 million years Some sources indicate an eccentricity slightly greater than 1 In that case Lulin will never again approach the Sun Lulin was closest to the Sun at perihelion on January 10 But it approached the Sun from the far side from our perspective Thus as Lulin recedes from the Sun it approaches Earth with closest approach on February 24 Not to worry though even at its closest Lulin will be about 150 times as far away as the Moon Many comets orbits are highly inclined to ours An inclination of 0 degrees would describe an orbit in the same plane as Earth s orbit Comet Lulin has an inclination of 178 37 degrees This inclination of almost 180 degrees puts Lulin back in the plane of the solar system orbiting backwards compared to the planets orbits Since Lulin orbits almost in Earth s orbital plane we see not only a tail but an anti tail This is dust and debris left behind as the comet moves on its path Lulin is now moving away from the Sun so the dust it leaves behind seems to point towards the Sun The true tail of a comet always points away from the Sun and therefore the tail leads the comet as it moves away from the Sun photo credit Wolfiewolf Because Lulin is roughly in the plane of the solar system traveling backwards it appears against the same zodiac band where we find the Sun Moon and planets in our sky As I type this Lulin is among the stars of Virgo the Virgin moving

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/see-a-hairy-star/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Mantids and Me :) | BEYONDbones
    arrive and then they grab it They catch things like bees flies butterflies and moths It s really amazing to see one of these mantids catch a fly in mid air photo credit emills1 Asian Flower Mantis This one is called the Asian Flower mantis and it comes from South and Southeast Asia They are quite small but have a very big appetite Their colorful wings and triangular eyes help them blend in with flowers They are very shy and don t enjoy being handled at all Right now I m raising nymphs of this species that are adorable My favorite of the flower mantids is the Spiny Flower Mantis from Africa photo credit emills1 They are fabulous They have a very distinctive pattern on their back to deter predators If that doesn t work they flash their brilliant yellow hind wings Many insects flash bright colors like red and yellow In nature these colors serve as a warning saying stay away I m dangerous It s really quite an interesting display and luckily this mantis did it while I photographing her She stood there beating her wings as if she were in flight for several minutes You can see what it looked like in the photo below They also have spines covering their body which make them look even more menacing No one wants to mess with these little mantids photo credit emills1 Mantids are masters of camouflage They have a lot riding on their ability to blend in with their environment Not only do they need protection from a wide variety of predators they must also remain hidden from their unsuspecting prey If they are discovered the prey will skedaddle and they ll be left hungry Different mantids exhibit camouflage that tells you what kind of environment they live in The orchid mantis for example I ll bet you don t need to scratch your head for too long to figure out where they hide The Florida bark mantis has extraordinary camouflage as well photo credit emills1 You can see for yourself here It looks like nothing more than an old lichen covered piece of bark It s amazing to me that an insect this cool is native to the US I would be so excited to see one of these in my backyard This Grass Mantis has got be hands down my very favorite He is a cutie and we want him to stay around forever Unfortunately males do not have as long of a lifespan This is another native beauty and can be found in Florida and Georgia We have some similar species here in Texas that are called stick mantids photo credit emills1 These mantids not only blend in they resemble a harmless walking stick So a small insect might feel a little too comfortable getting close to this guy until they are face to face with those grasping front legs So there you have it my mantis show I hope you will stumble upon

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/mantids-and-me/ (2016-02-12)
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  • This weekend: Body Worlds open for 60 straight hours | BEYONDbones
    Lets go check out Body Worlds Its open all weekend You Now It s 4 a m Other Yes now you fool Let s go So these scenarios may or may not happen to you exactly as rendered But the fact remains if you haven t seen BODY WORLDS 2 The Brain Our Three Pound Gem this weekend is your absolute last chance Luckily the exhibition will remain open around the clock during its final weekend in Houston You re only available at 2 15 a m No problem Tickets are available from 9 a m on Friday Feb 20 through 9 p m on Sunday Feb 22 BODY WORLDS 2 The Brain Our Three Pound Gem features more than 200 real human body specimens including more than 20 whole bodies healthy and unhealthy organs and body parts and slices all preserved through a remarkable process called Plastination a method for extracting bodily fluids and soluble fat from specimens and replacing them through vacuum forced impregnation with reactive resins and polymers As a result of this process visitors to BODY WORLDS will see inside the human body learn how it works and how it can be affected by disease and lifestyle choices 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged 24 hours Body Works body worlds brain HMNS human body late night plastination three pound gem by Steven Bookmark the permalink About Steven Steven never dreamed his first job out of college would be in public relations and on top of that working for one of the top museums in the country After all he majored in History at Vassar College Within three months of graduation he landed a spot in the PR department and has not looked back since He is fast becoming a communications fanatic

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/hmns-open-for-60-straight-hours-this-weekend/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Element III | BEYONDbones
    This description is from Dirk the museum s curator of anthropology He s chosen a selection of objects that represent human cultures throughout time and around the world that we ll be sharing here and on hmns org throughout the year This modern piece of art was made by Tammy Garcia Santa Clara Pueblo New Mexico It represents a step fret motif which we can find in Pre Columbian cultures dating back more than a millennium It shows up in Pre Columbian architecture in Mesoamerica as well as pottery and textiles from South America This Tammy Garcia piece embodies a link between the past and the present with the former continuing to be an inspiration for today Explore thousands of years of Native American history in the John P McGovern Hall of the Americas a permanent exhibition at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the photo gallery on hmns org 0 7 0 This entry was posted in Anthropology and tagged 100 years 100 objects Anthropology artifact centennial collections columbian culture HMNS Mesoamerica photo photo gallery pottery pre

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/100-years-100-objects-element-iii/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Girls Exploring Math and Science at HMNS this Saturday!! | BEYONDbones
    hosting booths on hands on topics ranging from catapults and gravity to probability and electricity Our Community partnership with the Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council has drawn in more and more girl scouts from across the council each year to come up with exciting topics to study and share with the GEMS visitors on Saturday during the event We have also invited other groups from the community to host booths in the Grand Hall of the Museum and share their love of Math and Science through hands on activities and information about their organizations The 2009 Community booths will include the Society of Women Engineers MD Anderson Cancer Center Baylor College of Medicine and the John C Freeman Weather Museum among other great organizations with lots to share to our visitors So bring your family and join us for a fun event learning about Science Engineering Math and Technology here at the Girls Exploring Math and Science event on Saturday February 21 2009 from 9am 12pm Come early so that you can beat the Saturday crowd see all of the great booths and really enjoy the event I would also definitely suggest buying your tickets online at www hmns org so you can just jump right in on Saturday and avoid the box office line 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Education and tagged Baylor College of Medicine catapult engineering event family gems Girl Scouts Girls Exploring Math and Science gravity John C Freeman Weather Museum MD Anderson Cancer Center National Engineers Week probability Saturday Scouts Society of Women Engineers by Allison Bookmark the permalink About Allison After volunteering at HMNS since 1993 Allison joined HMNS full time in 2003 Her current job responsibilities include curating the education collections and keeping the summer camp classrooms stocked with

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/girls-exploring-math-and-science-at-hmns-this-saturday/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Mock Mummification | BEYONDbones
    and bend it into a hook shape This is the shape of the instrument used to remove the brain from the head The embalmers inserted it through the nose The brain was considered a filler for the head kind of like stuffing and not important so it was discarded Pretend to remove the brain using the hook you made photo credit mamamusings 6 Next you need to remove the viscera from the body A cut was made into the left side of the mummy using an obsidian blade Use a black Sharpie marker to draw a line on the left hand side of the abdomen it was from here that the internal organs were removed Four of the organs were taken out and embalmed separately The liver lungs stomach and intestines were embalmed and placed in separate jars called canopic jars to be entombed with the mummy The heart was left in place inside the body They believed the heart controlled thoughts and emotions and served as the place where memories were stored The mummy would need to keep its heart Place your heart sticker on the mummy s chest 7 The body was then covered in something like salt called natron It took 40 days for the body to dry out The natron was changed often Sprinkle your mummy with salt to simulate the natron 8 When the body was dried out it was washed again using palm wine Wash off the figure using water dyed red palm wine Pat you re the body dry with a paper towel 9 The body was then stuffed with aromatic spices and resins This made the body smell at least a little more pleasant Use a drop of scented oil on your body to make it smell nice 10 The incision in

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/mock-mummification/ (2016-02-12)
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