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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Albino Raccoon | BEYONDbones
    lack of melanin which makes it possible to see clear through to the red blood vessels You can see larger and more detailed images of this rare specimen as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the photo gallery on hmns org 2 3 0 This entry was posted in Zoology and tagged 100 objects albino animals albino racoon albinos HMNS melanin photo photo gallery preserving objects Procyon Iotor raccoon racoon rare objects red blood vessels Science tradition by Dan Bookmark the permalink About Dan As curator of vertebrate zoology Dr Brooks has more backbone s than anyone at the Museum He is recognized internationally as the authority on Cracids the most threatened family of birds in the Americas With an active research program studying birds and mammals of Texas and the tropics Brooks advises several grad students internationally At HMNS Brooks served as project manager of the world renowned Frensley Graham Hall of African Wildlife overseeing building by an incredibly diverse array of talent by some 50 individuals He has also created and or served as curator for various traveling exhibits including Cracids on Wings of Peril View all posts by Dan 5 thoughts on 100 Years 100 Objects Albino Raccoon Dusty Holladay on November 18 2009 at 10 48 am said Last night my husband shot an albino raccoon true blue albino it has no markings on it even has no rings on his tail He is quite beautiful Everyone we have spoke with has not seen one or they havn t even heard of one Andrew Stewart on February 22 2011 at 2 58 pm said yes they are rare and i have one too i got mine in 2001 and got it mounted its very nice mount its in a display

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/100-years-100-objects-albino-raccoon/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Founder Jimmy Wales loves Wikipedia Loves Art | BEYONDbones
    on Valentine s Day that shares the love among photographers on Flickr anyone who s ever used Wikipedia read everyone and museums across the globe You can participate by shooting pictures of the items on the HMNS goal list any time in the month of February but we re also hosting a Wikipedia Loves Art meetup on Sunday Feb 15 from 6 9 p m The meetup will include free access to the permanent exhibition halls as well as conservatory and entomology exhibits at the Cockrell Butterfly Center for all registered Wikipedia Loves Art photographers Before coming to the meetup please be sure to register online Check in will be at a table in the Grand Hall More details the Wikipedia Loves Art Flickr page the Brooklyn Museum s announcement and the HMNS meetup post in our group pool on Flickr Hope to see you there 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged brooklyn museum founder of wikipedia HMNS identify artifacts jimmy wales meetup natural science museum photo scavenger hunt photography Science shoot pictures snapshots valentine s day video wikipedia wikipedia loves art wikipedia loves science wikipedia photos by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/founder-jimmy-wales-loves-wikipedia-loves-art/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Darwin speaks: NatGeo Live Blogging Event | BEYONDbones
    and as you might have noticed they re still kind of controversial even a century and a half later This weekend National Geographic is coordinating a live blogging event where you ll have the opportunity to debate the facts and ask questions of several experts on the subject Check out their blog for the experts bios and information about the event you can also submit questions in advance it s taking place this Sunday Feb 8 at 6 p m CT 7 p m ET in conjunction with the premiere of Morphed a new series showing various species evolve as natural forces impact them over millions of years If that s just not enough Darwin for you come to the Museum this weekend for Darwin Day You can see live animals study adaptations in insects and help create an evolutionary timeline that runs the length of the entire Museum meet paleontologists and explore representations of human evolution In conjunction with Darwin2009 we re also hosting Darwin related lectures and classes all year long You can also read more about Charles Darwin in anthropology curator Dirk s post An Aha Moment Worth Celebrating 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged animals ask questions controversy darwin darwin day darwin2009 Education event evolution experts on evolution family free HMNS insects live blogging morphed national geographic by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS In a past life she was a public relations and online marketing dynamo at HMNS View all posts by Erin B One thought on Darwin speaks NatGeo Live Blogging Event Phil Terry on February 8 2009 at 9 06 pm said Thanks for this great post National Geographic is supporting our efforts on Facebook to gather

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/darwin-speaks-natgeo-live-blogging-event/ (2016-02-12)
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  • A day in the life of “Bugs on Wheels” | BEYONDbones
    we do 30 minute presentations especially if the students are younger than 3 rd grade The older kids tend to sit still longer allowing us to gab away for 45 minutes to an hour Once the kids enter the class the first challenge is to sit them all in nice straight rows This part is hard for kids of all ages because they are distracted by the bugs of course Erin and I take turns introducing ourselves to each class We tell them that we are from the Houston Museum of Natural Science and that we work in the Cockrell Butterfly Center We used to ask if anyone has been to HMNS but we stopped doing that because every kid wants to tell a story of their visit here We always like to ask the kids questions about insects before we begin stuff like How many legs 6 How many body parts 3 head thorax abdomen What do they use to smell antennae What kind of skeleton do they have exoskeleton Do they have wings some do After this introduction Erin and I turn almost invisible because the bugs totally steal the show First we talk about all of the insects hissing cockroaches 3 walking sticks deer horned stag beetle and the giant long legged katydid I have to say the most impressive is the katydid which the kids really love We bring up important facts about each bug and ask lots of questions to the audience Things like camouflage mimicry environment adaptations and diet are among some of the things we like to talk about Next we discuss arachnids and compare and contrast them with insects The two arachnids we show the kids are the whiptail scorpion aka vinegaroon and Rosie our rose hair tarantula This section gives us the opportunity to clear up some misconceptions about tarantulas Most people think they are soooooo venomous and cannot believe we actually hold one Lastly we pull out the giant African millipede and have them guess what it is Every now and then we will get a correct guess but the majority of the guesses are caterpillar snake worm snail rollie pollie and centipede We actually have a preserved centipede that we can compare the millipede to and show the differences The best part about our presentation is that every kid if they want to can touch all of the bugs with the exception of the vinegaroon and the stag beetle who don t like to be touched Once we are all finished we open the floor up to questions and eventually move on to the next group Some days we do six 30 minute presentations and others we do three 1 hour presentations photo credit challiyan For us this program is very rewarding One of the best things is when a kid says YUCK when they first see the bug but after we persuade them to touch it they think it s cute Also helping kids understand that bugs aren

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/a-day-in-the-life-of-bugs-on-wheels/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Shutterbugs, unite: Wikipedia loves you! [free stuff] | BEYONDbones
    illustrate educational articles across an almost unimaginable range of topics in everyone s favorite online encyclopedia If your photos are chosen for use on Wikipedia you ll get full credit in the caption even better you can win great prizes As it turns out Wikipedia loves science too and your friendly local science museum is participating Check out our goal list as well as our photography guidelines and get ready to start shooting All that s required is the ability to identify an object and take a snapshot that shows it off anyone with a point and shoot camera and a free Flickr account can participate To sign up for Flickr go here and click Create Your Account You can also take a tour first to explore photo credit GcD 3 pictures More details the Wikipedia Loves Art Flickr page the Brooklyn Museum s announcement and the HMNS meetup post in our group pool on Flickr You can shoot at HMNS any time in the month of February but we re also hosting a Wikipedia Loves Art meetup on Sunday Feb 15 from 6 9 p m The meetup will include free access to the permanent exhibition halls as well as conservatory and entomology exhibits at the Cockrell Butterfly Center for all registered Wikipedia Loves Art photographers Before coming to the meetup please be sure to register online Check in will be at a table in the Grand Hall Hope to see you at the meetup And Happy Valentine s 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged brooklyn museum HMNS identify artifacts meetup natural science museum photo scavenger hunt photography Science shoot pictures snapshots valentine s day wikipedia loves art wikipedia loves science by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/shutterbugs-unite-wikipedia-loves-you-free-stuff/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Rhodochrosite | BEYONDbones
    red colored crystals perched on a crystallized matrix of quartz and tetrahedrite combine to create a level of sculptural composition and aesthetic beauty that make this one of the world s truly great mineral specimens Since its discovery it has attained legendary status as a Mona Lisa of the mineral world it is widely regarded as the finest example of rhodochrosite known and among knowledgeable collectors and connoisseurs it is considered to be the finest mineral specimen of any kind ever found Marvel at the world s most spectacular collection of natural mineral crystals in the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see larger and more detailed images of this rare specimen as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the photo gallery on hmns org 15 1 7k 0 This entry was posted in Gems Minerals and tagged 100 objects alma queen crystal gems HMNS mineralogy minerals photo photo gallery preserving objects quartz rare objects rhodochrosite Science tetrahedrite tradition by Joel Bookmark the permalink About Joel Not only is Joel the President of the Museum he s also a curator He has the rare distinction of having held almost every job here including security guard back before his museum career took him to distinguished posts all across the country At HMNS he built our outstanding collection of gems and minerals and the world renowned Wiess Energy Hall before being appointed President in July 2004 Since he s brought us Lucy Leonardo and check back here for his updates on the next big things coming up View all posts by Joel 4 thoughts on 100 Years 100 Objects Rhodochrosite William Good on June 18 2012 at 1 45 am said Warren Good was my grandfather My

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/100-years-100-objects-rhodochrosite/ (2016-02-12)
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  • The draw of Darwin | BEYONDbones
    Charles Darwin for a over a century Celebrating this legacy is what HMNS is all about When we introduced the concept of Darwin Day as a way to help convey the concept of evolution to children in the most fun way possible I had volunteers chomping at the bit to join in the fun Join us this Saturday to see live animals study adaptations in insects create an evolutionary timeline that runs the length of the entire Museum meet Paleontologists and explore representations of human evolution The fun is not just for kids though there is an entire series of events happening theough Darwin 2009 Houston check out this page for all the happenings at HMNS From teacher workshops and lectures to exhibits on The Origin of the Species it s going to be a year to remember one of the most influential scientists in recent history Darwin Day will be taking place at HMNS on Saturday February 7 from 11 a m 3 p m and is FREE to the public 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Education and tagged animals darwin darwin day darwin2009 Education event evolution family free HMNS insects by Jamie Bookmark the permalink

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/the-draw-of-darwin/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Go Stargazing! February Edition | BEYONDbones
    in February 2009 1st Quarter February 2 5 12 pm Full Moon February 9 8 49 pm Last Quarter February 16 3 38 pm New Moon February 24 7 35 pm The Full Moon of February 9 almost enters the Earth s shadow It does enter a region of space called the penumbra in which the Earth partially blocks the Sun This event is thus called a penumbral eclipse However it begins right as the Moon is about to set here in Houston What s more a penumbral eclipse is only a slight darkening of the Moon barely noticeable in the darkest skies In the morning twilight of February 9 you won t see much of any difference in the Moon as it sets photo credit S1lvers Family Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow on Groundhog Day meaning six more weeks of winter What does this have to do with astronomy Well Groundhog Day occurs about halfway between the winter solstice and the vernal spring equinox It therefore occurs near one of the cross quarter days called Imbolc by the Celts The other three are at the beginning of May August and November and they represent points halfway between the quarter days which are the equinoxes and solstices Since we don t want Phil to see his shadow we clearly don t want sunshine on February 2 If this seems backwards consider that there is another day when we don t want sunshine or warmth Christmas Houstonians still fondly recall our Christmas Eve snowstorm of 2004 while a similar snowfall on January 24 would have been much less romantic The French have the saying Christmas on the balcony Easter by the fireplace Early pagans considered the winter solstice and Imbolc symbols of winter itself If these days were appropriately wintry with

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/go-stargazing-february-edition/ (2016-02-12)
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