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  • High Fashion: Hot Wax Batik | BEYONDbones
    to be painted onto the fabric using a brush or to be poured onto the fabric directly Once the wax hardens it has penetrated the fabric and it is now time to dye the fabric The hard wax prevents the dye from penetrating the fabric in the areas it has been applied The wax is removed after the dyeing process by using a solvent or heat 3 Pick a fabric that you would like to dye Thin cottons work well not t shirt cotton You can buy remnants cheaply at a fabric store You will need to make sure and wash the fabric before the activity for the dye to penetrate properly 4 Melt the wax in a soap kettle or in the microwave Please be careful as hot wax can cause serious burns 5 Mix the cold water dye according to package directions Be careful not to get this on your clothing as it will NOT come out Put the dye aside for now photo credit allyrose18 6 Sketch out your design on a piece of scratch paper Make sure to keep in mind the size of your fabric and plan accordingly 7 Put down some old newspaper to work on Dip a q tip into the wax and use it to draw the design on your bag You could also use a fine tipped paint brush to apply your design Allow the wax to dry This takes very little time 8 Put on disposable gloves and immerse the fabric into the dye Be careful not to get it on your clothes as it will stain permanently 9 Remove the fabric from the dye and allow it to dry 10 Using an iron remove the wax by pressing the fabric between two pieces of heavy brown paper Grocery bags

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/hot-wax-batik/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Thank you, onliners! | BEYONDbones
    daily though I suppose it might be more surprising if you didn t You like Facebook waaaay more than MySpace by a margin of 35 and 1 6 are still stuck with dial up You re creative 35 are creating content on Flickr YouTube or Twitter 15 of you stop by our web site for more information about an exhibit after you visit the Museum in person a scenario we generally have not considered with regards to the information available online I can assure you we are considering that now along with all of the other needs and preferences you shared as we work on improving our online programs Thank you If you missed the survey or if you have any further ideas you d like to share please do so in the comments We would love to hear from you 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged HMNS internet iPod Touch online research online survey research survey results trends web site winner www hmns org by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS In a past life she was a public relations and online marketing dynamo at HMNS View all posts by Erin B 6 thoughts on Thank you onliners Thomas on February 4 2009 at 9 52 pm said I think that there should be highlights under each exhibit section that highlights some of the best specimens on display Also I ve been reading a book called Whose Muse Art Museums and the Public Trust I really enjoyed this quote by James Cuno director of the Art Institute of Chicago about the basic public trust of art museums and their roles in society In the end this is what our visitors most want from us to have access to works of art in order to change them to alter their experience of the world to sharpen and heighten their sensibilities to it to make it come alive anew for them so they can walk away at a different angle to the world Erin what do you feel the basis of public trust is for science museums Thomas on February 4 2009 at 9 55 pm said I sometimes feel that art museums typically appeal toward the upper echelon for their classiness You do not see kids running around and hear them screaming in art museum but you constantly hear it in HMNS Erin B on February 6 2009 at 4 20 pm said In my experience the kids who are running around and screaming are excited about what they re looking at which means they are learning exactly the outcome we strive to create for them and everyone who visits us no matter what age group every day And I think this point also addresses your first question the public trusts that we provide educational experiences in accordance with our mission Replace works of art with scientific artifacts in the quote you provide and

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/thank-you-onliners/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Book List: Education is the Key | BEYONDbones
    Missouri farmers purchased Mary a 13 year old slave George later wrote that he was born about 2 weeks before the war closed April 1865 but the exact date is not known Soon afterwards George his mother and his sister were taken to Arkansas by outlaws Although a friend of Moses Carver searched only George almost dead with whooping cough was found and returned home to be raised with Carver for a last name When the Civil War ended and the slaves were freed George and his older brother Jim were raised as the Carver s foster sons Because George was a sickly child he helped his foster mother with household chores instead of working in the fields However one outdoor chore George loved was working in the garden and he was interested in everything that lived there Being black the Carver boys were unable to attend the neighborhood school but when George was 12 his education began at a school for black students in Neosho Missouri 8 miles from the Carver s farm George never lived with his foster family again and about a year later he headed west for Kansas In 1886 George became a homesteader but following the blizzard of 88 he moved to Iowa where he enrolled at Simpson College and excelled in art However George left there to become the first black student and later the first black graduate of what is now Iowa State University Following graduation George headed for Tuskegee Alabama photo credit tamburix At Tuskegee George was head of the institute s research and agriculture departments and also managed the school s fields pastures orchards barns and beehives sheep chickens dairy cows pigs and other livestock In addition George also produced agricultural pamphlets for farmers George died in 1943 as America was fighting World War II Buried in Tuskegee near his friend Booker T Washington George s headstone reads He could have added fortune to fame but caring for neither he found happiness and honor in being helpful to the world photo credit zentolos Ms Harness book on George Washington Carver however is so much more than a biography it is a history of the world and many of the world s significant people during the lifetime of this incredible man The bottom of each page features a wonderful timeline that corresponds to the dates of the written information on that page The timeline features hard facts April 18 1906 San Francisco s terrible earthquake and also interesting trivia Did you know that M M s were invented in 1941 that Dr Pepper was first introduced in 1886 that the pogo stick was invented in 1919 or that Kleenex was invented in 1924 Before I wrote this article I asked Cheryl Harness if there is anything she would like to emphasize about George and she replied that she wants to make sure everyone understands Dr Carver s explanation of his endeavors Would it surprise you if I say that I have not

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/02/book-list-education-is-the-key/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Stone Money | BEYONDbones
    of a new object every few days This description is from Dirk the museum s curator of anthropology He s chosen a selection of objects that represent human cultures throughout time and around the world that we ll be sharing here and on hmns org throughout the year So how do you count your riches If you are an inhabitant of the Pacific island of Yap the answer would be simple look out of your window and count the circular stones lining your garden Different cultures have different ways to represent monetary value The inhabitants of the Pacific Island of Yap chose stone as a medium to express this As stone was not available on all islands and had to be transported by canoe the larger the stone the greater the effort and therefore also the value of the coin Considering the size of the stone we have in our collection and comparing it against others that are much bigger what we have might be called small change Explore thousands of years of Native American history in the John P McGovern Hall of the Americas a permanent exhibition at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the photo gallery on hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged 100 objects 100 years Anthropology artifacts coins HMNS money pacific islands photos preserving objects Yap by Dirk Bookmark the permalink About Dirk As curator of anthropology Dirk is responsible for the museum s artifact collection and is involved in its temporary and permanent anthropology exhibits Dirk is an expert in human cultures he curates the Museum s Hall of the Americas and specializes in native American

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/100-years-100-objects-stone-money/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Chemistry in the Kitchen: The Science Behind Butter | BEYONDbones
    baby food jar Butter knife Procedure 1 Fill your baby food jar about full with whipping cream 2 Add a pinch of salt for taste 3 Seal the cap on tight 4 Shake your jar up and down vigorously 5 You will notice that soon you will have a creamy substance that we know as whipped cream You re not done yet Keep shaking 6 Soon you will have a clump surrounded by a liquid The clump is your butter and the liquid is buttermilk 7 Drink the buttermilk if you like it s full of protein 8 Place your butter in a piece of cheesecloth and squeeze the excess liquid out 9 Use your butter knife to spread your creation on crackers and enjoy Background When milk straight from the cow is left to stand it separates into skim milk and cream The cream rises to the top The cream is full of proteins and fat When you shake the cream and agitate the fat globules they stick together to form butter The leftover liquid is called buttermilk and it is full of protein Interested in learning more about cooking and the science behind it BEYONDbones will be bringing you The Science of Food a series of videos exploring the science involved in the culinary creations of some of the best chefs in town Its all part of Big Bite Nite on April 30 an event featuring food from over 30 restaurants all in one location HMNS 3 1 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged Big Bite Nite butter buttermilk Chemistry in the Kitchen cooking cream HMNS Ireland make butter make it yourself making butter milk peat bogs science of food skim milk video by Kat Bookmark the permalink About Kat Kat has been both the

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/chemistry-in-the-kitchen-the-science-behind-butter/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Never a Dull Moment | BEYONDbones
    I think that would be particularly appropriate consider Tuesday February 24 2009 On that day a crew of museum people as well as representatives from museums in Mongolia and Russia were busy putting the final touches to the Genghis Khan exhibit That day we also received the Mongolian ambassador to the US H E Ambassador Khasbazaryn Bekhbat who was traveling to Houston for the formal opening of the exhibit two days later Accompanying him was the second secretary of the Mongolian embassy Dawadash Sambuu In the weeks leading up to the opening of the exhibit he had been very busy working in Houston helping with the set up of the show Representing the Hermitage Museum Dr Mikhail Piotrovsky flew in from St Petersburg Russia that day as well Also on February 24 the museum hosted a lecture as part of the year long Darwin celebrations Joining us that day was Dr Francisco Ayala He came in to talk about his research into evolution Dr Ayala a recipient of the National Medal of Science recently published a book on this subject entitled Darwin s gift to science and religion In a well attended lecture in the museum s IMAX movie theater Dr Ayala carefully explained his reasons why science and faith can go hand in hand Dr Ayala took time to meet with High School students from the Houston area who are participating in the museum s Young Scholars program In a closed meeting preceding his talk Dr Ayala explained how he got interested in his field of study and what one needs to do in order to achieve what he did On February 24 the museum hosted Mongolian diplomats a Russian museum official and a Spanish born geneticist While this kind of line up does not happen every day it

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/never-a-dull-moment/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects : Elbaite (on Quartz) | BEYONDbones
    of our history Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from Joel the Museum s President and Curator of Gems and Minerals He s chosen spectacular objects from the Museum s mineralogy collection which includes some of the most rare and fascinating mineral specimens in the world that we ll be sharing here and on hmns org throughout the year Tourmaline Queen Mine San Diego County California North America has produced some extraordinarily beautiful specimens of elbaite a member of the tourmaline group but the most admired are the bright red pink crystals with blue caps found in 1972 at the Tourmaline Queen mine The 24 cm example pictured here is the finest of the 33 major specimens recovered and is therefore the finest North American tourmaline The lustrous lusciously colored undamaged pair of crystals at the top grow from an undamaged quartz crystal and are accompanied by smaller tourmaline crystals It has been nicknamed The Rabbit Ears Marvel at the world s most spectacular collection of natural mineral crystals in the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see larger and more detailed images of this rare specimen as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the photo gallery on hmns org 0 4k 0 This entry was posted in Gems Minerals and tagged 100 objects crystals Elbaite gems HMNS mineralogy minerals photo photo gallery preserving objects quartz rare objects rocks Science tourmaline Tourmaline Queen by Joel Bookmark the permalink About Joel Not only is Joel the President of the Museum he s also a curator He has the rare

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/100-years-100-objects-elbaite-on-quartz/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Free Open House! at the Woodlands Xploration Station | BEYONDbones
    the opportunity to view demonstrations of the Outreach Programs with Melissa Hudnall There will be plenty of Museum Staff present to answer any questions you may have Chris Flis one of our very own Paleontologists will be on hand to discuss our newest Outreach Program Earth Science on Wheels Chris will also answer questions about our Whiskey Bridge Paleontology trips Educators will be given Information about field trips staff development opportunities and upcoming exhibitions at the Museum At the Houston Museum of Natural Science it is our goal to accommodate educators in any way possible With this in mind we welcome educators families at this particular event we know that childcare can be difficult to find As a further enticement Chick fil A refreshments will be provided so come hungry If you are interested in coming please let me know by sending RSVP s to ecrouch hmns org or 713 639 4754 Frogs dinosaurs insects luminous minerals and MORE await you at the Xploration Station 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged continuing education earth science on wheels field trips in Houston HMNS Outreach Programs Paleontology Science science for kids teacher education Woodlands Xploration Station by

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/free-open-house-at-the-woodlands-xploration-station/ (2016-02-12)
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