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  • Save the Date, Save Energy, Help Save the Planet! | BEYONDbones
    participation will make all of us think a bit more about how we use and misuse this finite resource and will inspire us to take further actions For more information visit www earthhour org or www earthhourus org If you can see this then you might need a Flash Player upgrade or you need to install Flash Player if it s missing Get Flash Player from Adobe Then on April 24 turn out your lights again for the 2nd annual Lights Out Houston program Although this program primarily targets Houston businesses all of us can participate Last year the electricity saved was enough to power 4 600 average Texas homes for a year Check out http www houston org lights out houston to learn more and to see a list of businesses corporations that participated in 2008 If your company is not on the list encourage the powers that be where you work to join this worthy effort And be sure to get outside to gaze up at the stars during these lights out events Without all the light pollution of a normally lit night in the greater Houston area you should be able to see a lot more stars

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/save-the-date-save-energy-help-save-the-planet/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Are you hungry, Houston? Big Bite Nite is coming! | BEYONDbones
    Natural Science and discover the culinary explorer inside as you taste the talents of some of Houston s most prestigious restaurants Delve into the cultural traditions of our diverse city with dancers and musical entertainment Explore the intricacies of cuisine from our spotlight country China Experience an epic oh yes EPIC journey of world food as we highlight delicacies from across the globe in this lavish culinary affair You want restaurants Here s a sneak peek 17 at Alden Hotel Arcodoro Bedford Restaurant Blue Nile Authentic Ethiopian Restaurant The Capital Grille Restaurant The Grove Hungry s Cafe and Bistro The Lake House Maggie Rita s Tex Mex Magnolia Club at Magnolia Hotel Monarch at Hotel ZaZa Morton s The Steakhouse Nelore Brazilian Churascurria P F Chang s China Bistro Polo s Signature Post Oak Grill Qin Dynasty Quattro at the Four Seasons RA Sushi Reggae Hut Ruggles Green Saffron Moroccan Cuisine and many more BIG BITE NITE will take place on Thursday April 30th from 6 9pm at HMNS 21 and up only Buy your tickets today for only 35 this event WILL sell out 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Energy Science and tagged Big Bite Nite

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/big-bite-nite/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Late Nights at HMNS! | BEYONDbones
    end of May we will have seen 3 school groups from out of state 5 scout groups and even one Overnight for Educators only Because some of our school field trips and our weekend Overnights fill up six months to a year in advance we have decided to start up another option for those of you who d like to know what the Museum is like after the field trips leave and the doors are shut for the day the late night of HMNS Our first Late Night has been developed for a group that is going to be auctioning off the spots for a fundraiser at their elementary school They ve selected to see a Cool Chemistry show performed by our very own Carolyn of Science on Stage a Planetarium show have a pizza party with the dinosaurs and then a late night flashlight tour of all of the spooky and gross things to see around the Museum The groups for these events are limited and activities can be selected to suit your group so you really do get the personalized backstage pass to the Museum after hours We re hoping this program will grow and we will be able to share our fun Museum adventures with more students and families who may not be quite ready to stay the whole night with us For more information on setting up an Overnight or a Late Night for your group email me at overnights hmns org As part of the FunHundred we re also offering a couple of late night events for families to sign up for individually including Dinos After Dark and A Night at the Museum check them out 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged camp in Dinos After Dark Education educator overnights

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/late-nights-at-hmns/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Falcate Orangetip | BEYONDbones
    description is from Nancy the museum s director of the Cockrell Butterfly Center and curator of entomology She s chosen a selection of objects that represent the rarest and most interesting insects in the Museum s collections that we ll be sharing here and on hmns org throughout the year A local species this attractive little butterfly only flies for a few weeks in early spring when the foodplant for its caterpillars weeds in the mustard family are abundant Once the caterpillars pupate they remain in the chrysalis stage until the following spring This photo shows what is called a series in insect collection terms this means a number of individuals of the same species Series especially when they include individuals from different areas and or collected over a period of time can provide scientists with important information about the range of variation in a species in color size etc as well as its distribution in time and space Learn more about butterflies and their relatives in a visit to the new Brown Hall of Entomology a part of the Cockrell Butterfly Center a living walk through rainforest at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/100-years-100-objects-falcate-orangetip/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Science Mystery: What came out of the Bearded Dragon’s Nose? | BEYONDbones
    just shed the majority of his skin except for a few pieces around his mouth It was actually one of the campers who noticed another piece of skin protruding from the beardie s nose It had sand on it and we couldn t tell if it was coming out or stuck into his nose so we picked at it and out it popped It was bizarre looking kind of stringy and surprisingly long just over a centimeter As it turns out we were a little hasty Since our beardie wasn t having any difficulty breathing we could have left the nostril shed alone as it would have come out on it s own if you are properly caring for your dragon Our dragon is none the worse for having picked his nose but we definitely won t do that again since the sensitive linings of the nose could have been damaged What are you looking at I like learning something new every day and this definitely qualified as a new thing So like Shel Silverstein s sharp toothed snail don t pick anyone s nose you never know what s in there Learn more about Bearded Dragons Check out our

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/science-mystery-what-came-out-of-the-bearded-dragons-nose/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Orange Milkweed by Eloise Thompson | BEYONDbones
    painting wildflowers mainly flowers of the American Southwest She started this project as she traveled with her husband Mr Wallace C Thompson an exploration geologist A selection of her wildflower paintings featuring Texas plants was included in the 1936 Texas Centennial Exposition a World s Fair held at Fair Park in Dallas Mrs Thompson would pick a sample of the flowering plant and draw and paint it for several days working at her kitchen table She collected the plant shown here in Conroe Texas and immediately painted this picture In 1964 100 of the paintings were incorporated in to a book entitled Wildflower Portraits with selected paintings accompanied by botanical descriptions by Edna Wolf Miner Ph D Mrs Thompson gave all of the original paintings in the book to the Museum in 1977 In 2005 her daughter Katrina Ladwig and grand daughter Laurel gave the Museum a collection of her watercolor and pencil wildflower studies The Orange Milkweed or Butterfly weed Asclepias tuberosa shown here is a perennial herb with flowers that vary in color from orange yellow to orange red It attracts many butterflies during June to late August especially Great Spangled Fritillary It can be found growing wild in dry fields and along road sides and ditches The Thompson Family has supported the Houston Museum of Natural Science through three generations Mr Thompson served on the Board of Trustees in the early 1960 s and as President of the Board from 1965 66 Mrs Thompson was an active member of the Museum s Guild leading school tours and fundraising for Museum programs Katrina followed in her mother s footsteps also serving on the Museum s Guild Laurel attended museum classes and worked at the Museum in the Astronomy Department throughout high school and college After graduation she joined

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/100-years-100-objects-orange-milkweed-by-eloise-thompson/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Katydid…She Did! | BEYONDbones
    This was a newer batch that was laid in mid November For months I have been doting over them and hoping that they would hatch On Thursday March 5 I found my first brand new little nymph I was absolutely overjoyed I now have 11 nymphs with 20 more eggs to go photo credit emills1 one of my babies These tiny little katydids have to shed their skin 6 times and in about 6 months they will have grown into the largest and loudest species of katydid Right now they are very goofy looking A tiny little body with extremely long skinny legs and antennae that are several times the length of their bodies Once they reach adulthood they will be put on display for visitors to see and travel to schools all around Houston to amaze children and teach them the wonders of the amazing world of insects I would like to thank all of the readers who sent in their comments and stories and would love to hear more If you have anything to say at all about katydids or insects in general feel free to leave a comment they are always appreciated To all of you insect enthusiasts out there happy bug watching photo credit emills1 One of our majestic Giants 7 0 0 This entry was posted in Plants Insects and tagged bugs entomologists Giant Long legged Katydid Giant Malaysian Katydid HMNS insects katydid katydid eggs katydids Macrolyristes corporalis nymph stilpnochlora couloniana by Erin M Bookmark the permalink About Erin M As an entomologist at the Cockrell Butterfly Center Erin designs creates and maintains exhibits for the Entomology Hall raises and cares for live insects and insect relatives and educates the public about the wonderful world of bugs View all posts by Erin M 6 thoughts

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/katydidshe-did/ (2016-02-12)
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  • How to Use the HMNS Sundial | BEYONDbones
    places the noon line on a sundial would be exactly aligned with due north Houston however is at just over 95 o W We have offset the noon line from true north to compsensate for this Along the noon line you ll also notice small shiny circles in the shape of an elongated figure 8 This is the analemma Earth s orbit around the Sun is an ellipse not really a circle Instead of remaining at a constant distance from the Sun Earth has a perihelion in January when it is slightly closer to the Sun and an aphelion in July when it is slightly father away The difference is small but enough to make Earth speed up near perihelion and slow down near aphelion This in turn causes the Sun to be a little ahead or lag a bit behind mean solar noon The difference between mean solar noon and the actual solar noon on a given date is the equation of time If you plotted the Sun s position in the sky at precisely the same time of day throughout a year you would create an elongated figure 8 this is the analemma This is the figure we have reproduced on the sundial At noon or 1pm in Daylight Saving Time the gnomon s shadow will fall not on the noon line but on the analemma Note the difference between the analemma point and the noon line on the date of your visit you ll need to mentally adjust the shadow s position by that much to make it agree with your timepiece The months of the year are also indicated along the noon line December is indicated farthest from the gnomon then January November February October March September April August May July and June The month names are written in a way to help you use the analemma In each pair the month on top farther from the gnomon is a month when the Sun is slightly behind mean solar noon and the shadow falls on the analemma to the left of the noon line as you face north During the months on the bottom of each pair closer to the gnomon the Sun is slightly ahead of mean solar noon and the noon shadow lands on the analemma to the right of the noon line Silver curves associated with each month or pair of months show the path of the gnomon s shadow on about the 21st of each month At a glance you can see how much longer the shadow is in December when the Sun is low than in June when the Sun is almost overhead On top of the gnomon is a silver ball with three pairs of holes These holes are aligned such that the Sun shines through a pair of holes near the equinoxes and solstices in 2009 March 20 June 21 September 22 and December 21 To allow for cloudy weather the holes are big enough for the Sun to

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/03/how-to-use-the-hmns-sundial/ (2016-02-12)
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