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  • BEYONDbones 500! | BEYONDbones
    from how to draw a dinosaur to how to create your own butter We have given you an inside look at each of our special traveling exhibits from Lucy s Legacy to the Birth of Christianity A Jewish Story to Genghis Khan Ever wonder what plants are best for attracting butterflies Ory helped you pick some out Can t figure out if that rock you found is really a meteorite James explained the difference Having trouble identifying that spider or insect living under your couch Erin and Laurie determined whether or not it was poisonous Jaime let you know what bands were playing here over the summer and Kat Havens guided teachers through experiments for their classes in addition to the many other fascinating posts from the staff here at the museum I want to thank our curators who walked us through the exhibits guest bloggers who expanded on the topic of their lectures and the dozen of our other bloggers that have brought you 500 posts over the last year None of this would be possible though without our loyal readers And as we push on into our second year of BEYONDbones we at HMNS would like to hear more from you What do you want to read about What topics are you most interested in What is your favorite artifact on display at the museum Please continue to comment on our blog and email suggestions to blogadmin hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged beyondbones birth of christianity blog bugs butterflies dinosaurs Genghis Khan HMNS host plants indentification insects Lucy meteorite mixers and elixers museum blog praying mantis by Steven Bookmark the permalink About Steven Steven never dreamed his first job out of college would be in public relations and on top

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/04/beyondbones-500/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Ankylosaurus at HMNS: 40 Year Mystery Solved | BEYONDbones
    empty space and the popularity of these visits was not lost on HMNS By 1969 the tour had ended Sinclair Oil was being bought out by Atlantic Richfield and the famous Brontosaurus logo was mostly retired Smithsonian Institute had declined the offer of the collection The dinosaur menagerie was put into storage The Sinclair Worlds Fair models as they appear now taken recently on a HMNS Field trip Texas offered up a unique home Dinosaur Valley State Park located along the Paluxy River near Glen Rose was in its infancy The park site contained scores of dinosaur tracks from the early cretaceous and initially it was thought that the entire collection would go to the newly created dinosaur themed state park However with the corporate take over by Atlantic Richfield and competing interested parties that deal fell through The park became home for the Tyrannosaurus rex and the Brontosaurus which can still be seen on display in the park The remainder of the collection was distributed across the country These two models seen left originally had moving parts the jaw opening and closing on the Tyrannosaurus and the neck moving on the Brontosaurus These simple motions thrilled the children of the 1960s and represented the first step in the creation of moving lifelike robotic dinosaurs such as the defunct Dinamation and in 2008 the Toyota Center show Walking with Dinosaurs So what is the Mystery Out of the collection two dinosaurs are officially listed as whereabouts unknown Thought by Worlds Fair Historians to be at the Cleveland Zoo and now listed as lost the Ankylosaurus has been exhibited continuously at HMNS since 1970 when it was officially donated to HMNS by the President of Atlantic Richfield The Ornitholestes however remains lost The smallest of the Dinoland sculptures at 6 feet long this small dinosaur could easily be in some enthusiast s living room garage rock shop or pancake house anywhere in America How do you hide an elephant in a cherry tree You paint his toenails red During the time the Sinclair Dinosaurs were touring the United States on flatbed trucks I thought this joke was very very funny In a sense though that is one reason the Ankylosaurus has remained missing This is not for lack of looking or curiosity Both the 1964 65 Worlds Fair and the Sinclair Dinoland exhibit have a substantial fan base today and original souvenirs still sell for a premium Cosmetic surgery is a popular trend now and to stay good looking the Worlds Fair Louis Paul Jonas Ankylosaurus had some work done albeit not in plastic surgery but in fiberglass So at the time when photographs of exhibits and artifacts were made available via the internet the Jonas Ankylosaurus had a dramatic new paint job a bellowing face lift and a dynamic repositioning of his derriere The makeover also created a new formidable base featuring a large oak like tree a not to mention a pack of harassing carnivorous Dromaeosaurs The missing Jonas

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/04/ankylosaurus-at-hmns-40-year-mystery-solved/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Pre-Columbian obsidian labrets | BEYONDbones
    learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from Dirk the museum s curator of anthropology He s chosen a selection of objects that represent human cultures throughout time and around the world that we ll be sharing here and on hmns org throughout the year Beauty is in the eye of the beholder or in this case in his lips These are volcanic glass lip plugs manufactured by Pre Columbian people in Mesoamerica They symbolize the great lengths Pre Columbian people would go through to look beautiful Imagine the high degree of craftsmanship required to manufacture these items Volcanic glass is brittle and thus a challenge to work Explore thousands of years of Native American history in the John P McGovern Hall of the Americas a permanent exhibition at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see larger and more detailed images of this rare specimen as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the photo gallery on hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Anthropology and tagged 100 objects

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/04/100-years-100-objects-pre-columbian-obsidian-labrets/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Breaking Bone-Head News! | BEYONDbones
    used its formidable nippers to bite off bits of vegetation and to bite other Dracorexes when the dinos got frisky Why didn t the Indianapolis skull preserve the holes for the deep roots of the nippers The sockets must have been huge since the root on the tooth was very long We don t know After death something or someone broke the bone along the front of the mouth destroying the sockets and loosening all the front teeth In paleontology there always surprises more on Butt Heads again soon 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Paleontology and tagged bob bakker Dracprex Dragon King HMNS hogwarts incisors Indianapolis Childrens Museum J K Rowling pachy pachycephalosaurid Pachycephalosaurus Paleontology stegoceras stygimoloch by Bob Bookmark the permalink About Bob The Museum s Curator of Paleontology world renowned Dr Robert T Bakker or as some call him Bob is the leader of the handful of iconoclastic paleontologists who rewrote the book on dinosaurs three decades ago Along with other noted paleontologists Bakker has changed the image of dinosaurs from slow moving slow witted cold blooded creatures to at least in some cases warm blooded giants well equipped to dominate the Earth for 200 million years Dr Bakker can be found all over the globe notably leading the Museum s paleontology field program View all posts by Bob 5 thoughts on Breaking Bone Head News Ralph Wilhelm on April 10 2009 at 8 12 pm said Bob I was watching a science channel show about mass extinctions where you said you didn t believe in an collision caused extinction One of the reasons you gave was that there would be fossils lying everywhere This is really a statistically unsound statement I make two assumptions neither of which needs to be anywhere close to reality but which allow me to plug in some numbers 1 The average age of a dinosaur that turned into a fossil was 10 years old 2 There were about an equal number of dinosaurs alive on earth at any time during the age of dinosaurs If the average age of a dinosaur was ten when it hit the ground then the number of dinosaurs that died during a ten year period would be the same as the number alive at any given time or the number that would hit the ground during a single event extinction Since there were about 16 million ten year periods in the total age of dinosaurs that means that the total number of fossils that have been collected to date which come from the entire 160 million year period is about 16 million times the number you would expect to find in any given ten year period or from a single event extinction This means that the fossil record of a single event extinction would be virtually undetectable I m looking forward to your Dinosaur Heresies update Ralph Wilhelm Raptor Lewis on December 8 2009 at 5 49 pm said I believe D hogwartsia to

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/04/breaking-bone-head-news/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Corundum | BEYONDbones
    every few days This description is from Joel the Museum s President and Curator of Gems and Minerals He s chosen spectacular objects from the Museum s mineralogy collection which includes some of the most rare and fascinating mineral specimens in the world that we ll be sharing here and on hmns org throughout the year Mogok Stone Tract Katha District Myanmar Formerly Burma Mogok has produced the world s finest rubies for over 800 years Gem quality Burmese rubies are usually rather small the 5 cm crystal on matrix shown here is exceptionally large with bright luster and excellent pigeon s blood red color Gem crystals such as this one that still have matrix attached are very rare Marvel at the world s most spectacular collection of natural mineral crystals in the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see larger and more detailed images of this rare specimen as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the photo gallery on hmns org 1 0 0 This entry was posted in Gems Minerals and tagged 100 objects artifacts gems HMNS minerals mogok photos preserving artifacts preserving

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/04/100-years-100-objects-corundum/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Up Close and Blurry | BEYONDbones
    it is Well I arrived at a Wildlife on Wheels program early and had my camera with me so I got a little shutter happy If you haven t tried those photo puzzles before here is your chance These are some of the photos I took along with a clue see if you can guess which animal it is Please be kind I am not a photographer just a novice with some time on my hands A toothy smile a mile wide lurking underwater I hide sneaking slowly toward a beest in Africa we love to feast Answer Soft and downy I may be through Australian bush I speed I ll get bigger just you wait at 6 feet tall my strides are great Answer An extreme mammal to say the least upon termites and ants I feast unlike the others I lay eggs though for kisses no one begs Answer Loud and raucous describes me well like most of my family I can tell bold and beautiful also apply it s in the Amazon I d rather fly Answer 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Zoology and tagged animals HMNS photo puzzles Science Wildlife on Wheels Zoology

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/04/up-close-and-blurry/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Big Bite Nite Video: The Science of Food – Ice Cream! | BEYONDbones
    What I anticipate the most while dining at these specialty eateries is the dessert menu which often includes homemade sorbets or ice cream made especially for me by the Pastry Chef Between you and me I figure I ve had the very best That is until I discovered Quattro s Executive Pastry Chef Philippe Valladares vanilla bean ice cream Quattro s Executive Pastry Chef Philippe Valladares Photo Credit debora smail reality photography Let me backup a bit I have my own personal Best of the Best list for food we all do However on my list The best place to eat ice cream category was taken and has been for a couple of years now In a matter of an hour Philippe easily captured the honors See why in part two of our Science of Food video series by clicking play on the video below Plus meet Philippe in person at Big Bite Nite at the Houston Museum of Natural Science April 30 You will adore what he has prepared especially for you Who s your favorite Pastry Chef in Houston Let us know P S Have you entered the Show Us You Biggest Bite Photo Contest yet There are great prizes at stake I got my Biggest Bite at Quattro while we filmed this video where will you get yours Want to make your own homemade ice cream Kat Havens teaches you how And you can try your hand at Philippe s recipe for Vanilla Bean Ice Cream with the recipe on our web site And in case you missed it check out the first Science of Food video Butter Living Through Chemistry with Polo Becerra Culinary Director and Adam Puskorius Executive Chef of Polo s Signature 1 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged Big

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/04/big-bite-nite-video-the-science-of-food-ice-cream/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Giant sphinx moth | BEYONDbones
    a new object every few days This description is from Nancy the museum s director of the Cockrell Butterfly Center and curator of entomology She s chosen a selection of objects that represent the rarest and most interesting insects in the Museum s collections that we ll be sharing here and on hmns org throughout the year This large sphinx moth Cocytius antaeus has an extremely long proboscis tongue here seen fully extended as it would be if the moth were sipping nectar from the bottom of a very long tubed flower Important pollinators some sphinx moths have very specific relationships with the plants they pollinate The giant sphinx for example is the only known pollinator of the rare and delicate ghost orchid of Florida s swamps Ranging from our southern states southward into the Amazon basin this moth is the New World equivalent of the famous Darwin s sphinx moth Xanthopan morganii As the story goes when Darwin encountered the very long spurred Angraecum sesquipedale orchid in Madagascar he predicted that one day someone would discover a sphinx moth with a proboscis of the same length as the 12 14 inch nectar spur He was proven right 40 years after his death when X morganii with its 13 inch proboscis was discovered If you find the sphinx moth really cool come down to the Cockrell Butterfly Center and see a special art exhibit that the students of Stephen F Austin State University created Learn more about butterflies and their relatives in a visit to the new Brown Hall of Entomology a part of the Cockrell Butterfly Center a living walk through rainforest at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/04/100-years-100-objects-giant-sphinx-moth/ (2016-02-12)
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