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  • Behind-The-Scenes: The Kneeling Archer Emerges | BEYONDbones
    China s first emperor is coming together once more just waiting to be discovered Last Thursday the artifact emerging from its shipping crate was The Kneeling Archer one of the most perfectly preserved warriors in the exhibition The Museum had invited media to witness the event and you could feel the anticipation as countless bolts were loosened and the lights began to shine into this warrior s temporary home The Kneeling Archer before he is fully uncrated for display You ll see him in the first gallery of the exhibit opening May 22 at HMNS Seeing this Warrior up close his steady gaze the craftsmanship that made his body seem ready for battle even after two millennia the delicate layers of paint still offering a slight burst of color to his uniform and features it was an amazing and very dramatic experience Visitors to the exhibit will see The Kneeling Archer as well as 13 other warrior figures plus other tomb artifacts from the necropolis of Qin Shi Huang my favorites the gorgeous life size swan figure and warriors that were excavated with parts missing you can see inside to the craftsmen s markings We were able to take some

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/05/behind-the-scenes-the-kneeling-archer-emerges/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Kodak Baby Brownie Camera | BEYONDbones
    of objects that represent our Museum s history and our collections of historical technologies that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year Baby Brownie cameras were one of the many varieties of the Brownie camera made for the Eastman Kodak camera company in the early to mid 1900s This particular camera designed by Walter Dorwin Teague in the art deco style was patented and produced from 1934 1941 Originally sold for 1 00 the plastic camera ran on 127 film which was included and produced 6 x 4 inch images The Baby Brownie was mainly marketed towards children and Kodak claimed it was so easy to use that anybody man woman or child who has sufficient intelligence to point a box straight and press a button could take successful photographs Brownie cameras helped to launch photography as a hobby and the snapshot was introduced Since people no longer needed to understand the technicalities of cameras or the development of film in order to take a picture cameras became a staple in the American home by the 1950s The small size travel portability and low cost of the Baby Brownie developing film cost 40 cents per roll allowed for a new use of the photographic medium creating a new window into life in the home at work at leisure and while traveling Thus photography was now spontaneous and no longer restricted to the rare family portrait or the work of an artist You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org 1 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged 100 years 100 objects antiques artifacts Baby browni camera Baby brownie HMNS

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/05/100-years-100-objects-kodak-baby-brownie-camera/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Adopt A Butterfly – tomorrow! | BEYONDbones
    mountain of stuffed animals would contentedly rest on her shoulder anticipating every note When I was little she would hold my hand at the doctor s office read me stories whenever she could and put giant ridiculous bows in my hair hey it was the 80s There weren t cell phones so quality time was ALL the time and I couldn t get enough of her smiles and attention To this day she s my guide my mentor and my role model I am lucky to say that she s also my best friend The butterflies always remind me of her because of their vibrant colors and their graceful ways They seem so fleeting yet they are always around We are lucky in Houston to have them almost year round When you come to Adopt a Butterfly this Saturday and hold that delicate life in your hand you are a mother or a father You are bringing that beautiful butterfly to its new home and giving it a wonderful life You also are contributing to the continuation of butterflies in the center You should bring your Mom too I bet those little delicate butterflies remind her of you and memories

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/05/adopt-a-butterfly-tomorrow/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Photo from You: Insect Identification | BEYONDbones
    favorable conditions inside your home That s when you may run into them Mike sent us this e mail shortly after the huge rainstorm we had so that is a possible reason for them being in his house Another possibility is that there was a lot of moisture in his attic perhaps some sort of a leak The scuds could have been searching for a moist and warm environment and found it No matter how they got there they are nothing to worry about These bugs are harmless detritivores that feed on tiny bits of organic matter and will do no damage inside your home In fact once they re in there they will probably just die from dehydration and will have been no more than a slight nuisance So if you ever find anything resembling a huge flea or small shrimp you can rest easy Thanks for the e mail Mike If you ever need help identifying a weird bug you ve found please snap a quick but clear photo of it and send it into blogadmin hmns org We will do our best to identify it for you quickly and your photo can be featured on our blog Who knows maybe it will help out someone else trying to identify the same thing You are also welcome to bring it in Until next time happy bug watching 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Plants Insects and tagged amphipods arthropods crustaceans detritivore fleas huge flea insect identification insects isnect photos scuds shrimp by Erin M Bookmark the permalink About Erin M As an entomologist at the Cockrell Butterfly Center Erin designs creates and maintains exhibits for the Entomology Hall raises and cares for live insects and insect relatives and educates the public about the wonderful world of

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/05/photo-from-you-insect-identification-4/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Spondylus americanus | BEYONDbones
    a new object every few days This description is from Tina the museum s associate curator of malacology She has chosen a selection of objects that represent the most fascinating shells and animals in the Museum s collections that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year This beautiful orange specimen of the Atlantic Thorney Oyster is not an oyster at all It is a member of the same Family and Pectens or scallops They are edible as are all the members of this Family but do not occur in large numbers so are not generally consumed by the general public Their habitats range from North Carolina to Florida to Texas and down to Brazil They are quite variable in color and in length and number of spines This rare color specimen was found by a diver on a ship wreck off the Texas coast You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged 100 objects 100 years artifacts Atlantic Thorney Oysterm Oectens

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/05/100-years-100-objects-spondylus-americanus/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Diamonds: Not Just Another Pretty Facet! | BEYONDbones
    about one fifth of mined diamonds are suitable as gems used for jewelry the rest are deemed industrial grade and are shipped off to aid in a variety of jobs They have applications in the mining machining electronic and medical industries just to name a few That being said only about 10 of diamonds used for industrial purposes are natural 90 are synthetic Photo Credit Jurvetson The unit of measure most frequently associated with diamonds is the carat thought to have been derived from the Carob Bean an ancient measure of weight One metric carat equals about 0 2 grams When you see a cut diamond remember that it started out as a natural rough stone and weighed about two times as much About 50 of a stone s weight is lost in the cutting process Now that you are knowledgeable about the practical uses for diamonds let s move on the impractical romantic things The reason women wear engagement rings on the third finger of their left hand dates back to ancient Egypt It was believed that the vena amoris or vein of love ran from the tip of this finger straight to the heart Speaking of engagement rings the tradition of giving a diamond ring for an engagement began in 1477 when Archduke Maximilian of Austria gave one to his then betrothed Mary of Burgundy Ever dream of owning a diamond larger than the standard one carat Just remember that only approximately one diamond in a million weighs one or more carats AND to find a single rough carat of diamonds requires the mining of about 250 tons of earth The ancient Greeks believed that diamonds were splinters of stars fallen to Earth Plato wrote about diamonds as living entities embodying celestial spirits Obviously there is just something

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/05/diamonds-not-just-another-pretty-facet/ (2016-02-12)
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  • May Book List: Hispanic Culture | BEYONDbones
    Library Association with both the Newbery Honor Book Award the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children and the Caldecott Honor Book Award the most distinguished American picture book for children The Legend of the Poinsettia follows dePaola s incredibly successful The Legend of the Bluebonnet and The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush legends familiar to every schoolchild in Texas In The Legend of the Poinsettia Lucida s family lives in the mountains of Mexico One day near Christmas Padre Alvarez visits her family and asked Lucida s mother to weave a new blanket for the figure of Baby Jesus in the Christmas procession The blanket is a gift to the Baby Jesus on Christmas Eve After buying the finest yarn Lucida s mother becomes sick and has to live with relatives until she recovers Lucida tries to weave the blanket but the yarn becomes hopelessly tangled On Christmas Eve Lucida hides because she has no gift to give but an old woman tells her Any gift is beautiful because it is given Lucida gathers green weeds places them around the altar in the church and kneels to pray Instantly the end of each weed becomes tipped with a flaming red star and the weeds outside the church are transformed too The people of the village call the brightly colored flowers La Flor de Nochebuena the Flower of the Holy Night the poinsettia Lucida s simple gift is a part of our Christmas traditions today Gary Solo is a well known Hispanic author of both books for children and young adults The picture book Too Many Tamales celebrates family love at Christmas Maria and her mother are making tamales for Christmas Eve dinner While kneading the masa the temptation becomes too great for Maria and she tries on her mother s special ring before she returns to making the tamales A few hours later aunts uncles and cousins arrive and the children go upstairs to play Maria suddenly remembers the ring and knew it must have been baked into one of the 24 tamales The cousins ate all the tamales but found no ring so Maria had to tell her mother what she had done All s well that ends well and Maria s Aunt Rosa reminds everyone that the second batch of tamales always tastes better than the first A Native American Kiva photo credit Dave Boyer Plan a visit to the McGovern Hall of the Americas on the third floor of the Houston Museum of Natural Science This incredible hall has examples of Native American life from the Arctic to the Amazon You will learn about life in a kiva see a collection of kachina dolls discover the importance of the jaguar to the cacao fields witness an ancient ball game played by the Aztecs and so much more After reading about Hispanic culture you will experience it for yourself 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Education and tagged Aztecs booklist books for kids books

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/05/may-book-list-hispanic-culture/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Go Stargazing! May Edition | BEYONDbones
    can you follow it All the way to May 31 Once it s gone the Dog Days are upon us Saturn remains well placed in the evening sky this month Look for it in the south at dusk Mercury is briefly visible at dusk for the first week in May Mercury is bright enough to appear in twilight while most stars aren t Look low in the west northwest at dusk right over the point of sunset A compact cluster of stars called the Pleiades is nearby The Constellation Orion photo credit Wisze Jupiter in the south southeast at dawn is the brightest thing in that part of the sky unless the Moon is nearby as it is on May 17 Venus is a dazzling morning star this month Look east right at day break for the brightest thing there except for the Moon Venus remains the morning star for the rest of 2009 Mars remains close to the horizon at dawn much of the spring and takes longer to fully emerge into the morning sky Look in the south at dusk for stars in the shape of a backwards question mark with a right triangle to the left of that These are the stars in Leo the Lion Saturn is under the right angle in that right triangle The Big Dipper is highest on spring evenings From the Big Dipper s handle you can arc to Arcturus Arcturus in the east at dusk is the fourth brightest star we ever see at night and will be the brightest one left once Sirius sets Continuing the curve of the Big Dipper s handle past Arcturus you can speed on to Spica a star low in the southeast at dusk Spica represents a stalk of wheat held by Virgo the Virgin

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/05/go-stargazing-may-edition-2/ (2016-02-12)
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