archive-org.com » ORG » H » HMNS.ORG

Total: 1158

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • This is a test… | BEYONDbones
    there is a salt water tank in the Grand Hall that houses the sea urchins lightning whelks and horseshoe crabs we use in our Outreach program Wildlife on Wheels The sea urchins we currently have are of two kinds Variegated or Short spined Urchins Lytechinus variegatus and Pencil Urchins Eucidaris tribuloides While they are related they are very different in appearance The Short spined looks more like a pin cushion and the Pencil Urchin looks more like pretzel sticks stuck to a ping pong ball Their different appearances give us clues to their behavior and lifestyles You will often see our Short spined Urchin clinging to the side of the tank with shells and bits of rubble stuck to it These urchins are more active during the daytime and the most favored theory is that they use the small pieces of shell or rock as sun protection like a hat to prevent excessive UV exposure Their spines are rather sharp and a great defense Not that there are predators in the tank but the horseshoe crabs have been known to roll the urchins around sort of exploring the other occupants of the tank We keep telling them the urchins are not toys but they haven t really caught on yet The Pencil Urchins move very little so if you visit the tank on your way in and stop by on your way out they are likely to be in the same place They often go unnoticed in the tank These urchins have very blunt spines hence the pencil though I d like to see one named the Pretzel Urchin More active at night they spend their days holed up in rocks to avoid predators Once they wedge themselves in it is very difficult to remove them far easier to move

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/05/this-is-a-test/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Black Diamond | BEYONDbones
    this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from Dan the museum s curator of vertebrate zoology He s chosen a selection of objects that represent the most fascinating animals in the Museum s collections that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year During a circus parade in Corsicana TX during the 1920 s this famous elephant attacked members of the public audience while his handler wasn t paying attention What ensued after the attack would surely have been one of the strongest publicized cases regarding humane treatment of captive elephants You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Zoology and tagged 100 objects 100 years artifacts black diamond circus accidents elephant objects preserving artifacts wildlife Zoology by Dan Bookmark the permalink About Dan As curator of vertebrate zoology Dr Brooks has more backbone s than anyone at the Museum He is recognized internationally as the authority

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/05/100-years-100-objects-black-diamond/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Phosphophyllite | BEYONDbones
    we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year This description is from Joel the Museum s President and Curator of Gems and Minerals He s chosen spectacular objects from the Museum s mineralogy collection which includes some of the most rare and fascinating mineral specimens in the world Unificada Mine Cerro Rico de Potosi Bolivia Phosphophyllite crystals from Potosi with their beautiful bluish green color brilliant luster and attractive transparency are among the most highly desired treasures in the mineral world They are rare today because most crystals were destroyed by mining before their identity was even understood Any size crystal larger than one centimeter is highly valued and this 6 8 cm twinned pair of gem crystals the second largest known should probably be considered priceless Marvel at the world s most spectacular collection of natural mineral crystals in the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals at the Houston Museum of Natural Science You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org 0 36 0 This entry was posted in Gems Minerals and

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/100-years-100-objects-phosphophyllite/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • June Flickr Photo of the Month: Bananagrams | BEYONDbones
    in honor of the Wikipedia Loves Art event at the Houston Museum of Natural Science on February 15 2009 Many thanks to Erin for arranging this opportunity and for the Museum for being so photographer friendly I used Bananagrams tiles similar to Scrabble and my HO scale miniature photographers Not a very complicated set up I used an Ott light and the top of my microwave Photo Credit Sulla55 The photos submitted from the Wikipedia Loves Art event were amazing I only wish we could show every photo on our blog but you can check them all out here Erin and I want to give a big thanks to everyone who came and made this event such a success The winning team was Assignmenthoustonone Thank you to Sulla55 Stephaniedancer Mockbird Kinjotx Skarsol and Jjsala for submitting and sharing such beautiful photos Each member won a yearlong free family membership and four tickets to see our Terra Cotta Warriors exhibit If you d like to be invited to future photography events at HMNS join our HMNS group on Flickr 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged flickr HMNS photographs photography photos scavenger hunt terra cotta warriors wikipedia

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/june-flickr-photo-of-the-month-bananagrams/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Where have all the sunspots gone? | BEYONDbones
    in and of itself When we observe the Sun at the H alpha wavelength a particular wavelength of red light sunspots appear brighter than the Sun s disk Once formed sunspots exist for about two weeks They also vary in size with the biggest sunspots being up to 50 000 miles across Compare that with the Earth which is less than 8 000 miles across photo credit fdecomite It turns out that the biggest sunspots are noticeable to the naked eye when the Sun is low to the horizon or seen through mist or clouds You should never try this however always observe the Sun by projecting its image or by looking through a filter expressly designed for this purpose There is evidence though that before modern understanding and technology early astronomers risked eye damage by looking at the Sun when it seemed dimmer than usual For example ancient Chinese astronomers may have made reference to sunspots in 28 BC This may have supported the legend that a raven lived in the Sun photo credit dizarillo Early telescope users Galileo Galilei and Thomas Harriot were among the first western astronomers to observe sunspots David Fabricius and his son Johannes were the first to publish a description of sunspots in June 1611 In 1843 German astronomer Heinrich Schwabe discovered that the number of sunspots varies in a cycle of about 11 years Swiss astronomer Rudolf Wolf then used data from Schwabe and others to reconstruct solar cycles back to about 1745 Wolf designated the cycle from 1755 1765 as Cycle 1 and we still use that count today Accordingly the last cycle which peaked in 2001 was Cycle 23 and the next cycle expected to begin now and peak in 2012 will be Cycle 24 Also solar astronomers use the Wolf number to describe the number of sunspots on the Sun It was George Ellery Hale who first associated sunspots with magnetism This graph shows that not all solar cycles are the same Peaks in the early 19th century were much smaller than those of the 20th century for example Towards the left of the graph covering about 70 years including the last half of the 17th century is a period which seems to have no peaks This is the Maunder Minimum noted by Edward R Maunder The decades of few sunspots coincided with decades of unusually cold winters in Europe and North America This is also a time when few aurorae were observed In fact the 11 year cycle of minima and maxima continued in this time as well it s just that the peaks were very very small compared to later periods For much of 2009 we ve been past due for the start of the next solar cycle Cycle 24 Since the peak of Cycle 23 occurred in 2001 and the next peak was expected in 2012 scientists expected to begin seeing many Cycle 24 sunspots in late 2007 and especially by 2008 Instead 266 of the 366

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/where-have-all-the-sunspots-gone/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Mastodons in Manhattan? Or, Pachyderms of the Pleistocene | BEYONDbones
    have been home to mastodons giant beavers a herd of fearsome Postosuchus or Ice Age bears A new Discovery Channel series profiles six cities across the United States each with their own unique story to tell about the richness of prehistoric life With stories ranging from the Triassic to the Pleistocene the variety of life that came before us is truly amazing photo credit The Gut Check out this video to see the HMNS visiting curator of paleontology Dr Robert Bakker discuss the hairy monsters that once roamed the boggy forests that would be transformed by both natural and human forces into modern day Manhattan Watching the cityscape melt away into verdant wetlands of the Pleistocene is pretty amazing as is seeing the ancient plant life still growing through modern sidewalks You can see more when Prehistoric New York airs locally this Sunday June 28 at 8 p m on the Discovery Channel 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Paleontology and tagged bob bakker curator discovery channel giant beaver HMNS houston museum of natural science manhattan plesitocene postosuchus prehistoric life prehistoric new york robert bakker triassic by Erin B Bookmark the permalink About Erin B Erin is the

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/mastodons-in-manhattan-or-pachyderms-of-the-pleistocene/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 100 Years – 100 Obejcts: Haliotis dalli | BEYONDbones
    learn more about this diverse selection of behind the scenes curiosities we will post the image and description of a new object every few days This description is from Tina the museum s associate curator of malacology She has chosen a selection of objects that represent the most fascinating shells and animals in the Museum s collections that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year Henderson 1915 As a member of the Abalone family of Mollusks Halitois dalli is a very small species which is found only in the Galapagos Islands from deep water where it is only rarely seen This one measures 20 mm and was found in 1980 off Isla Santa Cruz in 60 meters of water You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged 100 years 100 objects abalone family Galapagos Islands Haliotis dalli HMNS isla santa cruz malacology mollusks photos preserving artifacts preserving objects sea shells shells by Steven Bookmark the permalink About Steven Steven never dreamed

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/100-years-100-obejcts-haliotis-dalli/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cool out with Molly & the Ringwalds at Mixers! | BEYONDbones
    and that means that the humidity is knocking at the door Most ladies dread that frizzed out hair look but not you You re going to make the best of that crazy do by putting on that off the shoulder shirt from Express those white hot leggings from American Apparel and you re going to Vogue like Madonna always wanted Go ahead pair that crazy outfit with checkered keds why Because Molly the Ringwalds will be playing at Mixers Elixirs this Friday night That means the craziest coolest most tubular band is going to ROCK OUT at HMNS under the dinos See you at 6 p m Be there or be square This week Molly The Ringwalds July 3 Holiday Weekend Mixers Resume July 10 July 10 Experience a British Invasion with The Fab 5 July 17 Join the high energy dance floor with the bilingual band Mango Punch Many more fabulous Mixers to come check out mixershouston hmns org for more info 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged dancing dinos Friday heat humidity Mixers Molly the Ringwalds music by Jamie Bookmark the permalink About Jamie I love my job As promotions manager Jamie throws

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/cool-out-with-molly-the-ringwalds-at-mixers/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •