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  • “Bird-Airplane” Collisions and Forensic Ornithology | BEYONDbones
    In the wrong place at the wrong time a bird is silhouetted against the clear blue Florida sky upper left as it falls away from Space Shuttle Discovery after hitting the external tank during liftoff of mission STS 114 in July 2005 Credit NASA Take bird airplane collisions like the Hudson River Landing By knowing which bird s collided with the airplane a management plan for that bird species can be made to prevent such collisions in the future As an aside is it really fair to put the bird first in bird airplane collision Or what about Bird hits External Tank during Shuttle Launch As if the bird was the one traveling with boosters strapped to its keel All kidding aside analysis of the bird remains can help focus on which species may need management Leading to alternate aircraft routes during peak bird activity to avoid potential collisions using bird radar to track flocks of birds such as NASA uses and even sound cannons strategically placed to keep birds out of the aircraft s flight path So where does one go to have birds or their remains identified If it is a larger sample the Museum s very own collection can help Dr Dan Brooks Curator of Vertebrate Zoology has identified parts of birds for museums and the USF WS U S Fish Wildlife Service to ascertain whether or not it was a species listed as Threatened Endangered or CITES He has also used the collection and his own vast knowledge to identify feathers in Indigenous people s ornaments including the Ice Queen mummy of National Geographic fame Pretty cool For the high tech study of bits and pieces used as evidence in court cases professionals usually turn to the NMNH s Feather Identification Lab photo credit ljmacphee In

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/bird-airplane-collisions-and-forensic-ornithology/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Walk like a bird: a dino-track puzzle | BEYONDbones
    up in a few places can you see where There s one place where the dino sat down to rest You can see the imprint of the big tendon that was on the back of the shin and ankle called the Achilles tendon And you can see the hand prints also The Anomoepus hand was a very primitive dino hand with five fingers Can you see where the critter squatted down on all fours Tracks like these prove that dinos walked like birds and hardly ever jumped like a kangaroo 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Paleontology and tagged animal tracks Anomoepus dinosaur footprints dinosaur tracks Early Jurassic Jurassic omnivores by Bob Bookmark the permalink About Bob The Museum s Curator of Paleontology world renowned Dr Robert T Bakker or as some call him Bob is the leader of the handful of iconoclastic paleontologists who rewrote the book on dinosaurs three decades ago Along with other noted paleontologists Bakker has changed the image of dinosaurs from slow moving slow witted cold blooded creatures to at least in some cases warm blooded giants well equipped to dominate the Earth for 200 million years Dr Bakker can be found all over the globe notably leading the Museum s paleontology field program View all posts by Bob One thought on Walk like a bird a dino track puzzle Raptor Lewis on June 28 2009 at 11 50 pm said My guess is that Anomoepus was an Early Jurassic Therizinosaur or Primitive Ornithomimid somewhere in the transition period between diets or this could also prove that other theropods namely Coelurosaurs that is if Ornithomimids ARE Coelurosaurs like the Tyrannosauridae shared a common ancestor but branched off from there In other words Ornithomimids have a separate lineage than other theropoda and Coelurosaur Anywho

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/walk-like-a-bird-a-dino-track-puzzle/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Look What I Found! Exotic insects in the Houston area | BEYONDbones
    all you re missing is a very menacing red orange head These centipedes are very common in West Texas and the Southwestern United States occasionally they are found in the hill country and sometimes even close to Houston I think it s very important to teach people the difference between centipedes and millipedes and what better example is there Centipedes can be dangerous especially this one They are predators capable of injecting venom with their fangs Most centipedes are harmless to people but because of its size and potent venom this one can do some damage They are not particularly aggressive just don t try to handle them ouch Later in the week two men called and tried to describe what they had found on their front porch Several things went through my mind but as usual I had to see it to get a positive identification What they brought me was something I d never seen before here in Texas I had however seen something similar in Arizona so I had a pretty good idea of what it was photo credit emills1 Meet the Hardwood Stump Borer At first glance most people mistake it for a cockroach It is similar in size shape and color but this is a type of longhorn beetle The eggs are laid in hardwoods such as oak and sycamore The larvae develop inside the wood eating and growing for about 3 to 4 years The pinchers are not just for show and can deliver a painful bite My co worker saw one of these at her daughter s swim meet recently as well so you may get lucky and see one yourself If you ever see a mysterious incredible beautiful or odd bug that you ve never seen before please give us a ring

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/look-what-i-found-exotic-insects-in-the-houston-area/ (2016-02-12)
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  • 100 Years – 100 Objects: Pink Pigeon | BEYONDbones
    is from Dan the museum s curator of vertebrate zoology He s chosen a selection of objects that represent the most fascinating animals in the Museum s collections that we ll be sharing here and at 100 hmns org throughout the year The Pink Pigeon Nesoenas mayeri is one of the larger forms of tree dwelling pigeon in nature They are endemic to the island of Mauritius in the Mascarene Island chain where the now popularly publicized yet sadly extinct Dodo bird Raphus cucullatus was found Indeed these two forms were members of the same avian Family Columbidae The Pink Pigeon is considered Critically Endangered by BirdLife International with its numbers not exceeding 400 individuals This species is in all likelihood the rarest species of vertebrate in the collection You can see more images of this fascinating artifact as well as the others we ve posted so far this year in the 100 Objects section at 100 hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Zoology and tagged 100 years 100 objects birdlife international Columbidae Dodo bird HMNS Mascarene Island Mauritius Nesoenas mayeri perserving objects Pink pigeon preserving artifacts Raphus cucullatus by Dan Bookmark the permalink About Dan

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/100-years-100-objects-pink-pigeon/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Conservators – Collections’ Heroes | BEYONDbones
    with they re highly educated trained and skilled After all they work with irreplaceable highly valued objects you won t find crazy glue scotch tape or duct tape among their work tools They have a deep background in organic chemistry so they can understand the nature of the object the damage done and the proper treatment Conservators know and or can puzzle out the chemical and mechanical reactions of an object to a treatment such as adhesive paint or physical support In addition to what they already know they re constantly updating their knowledge of the chemical make up of the latest paint adhesives inks paper etc The science of object conservation is amazing Our conservator works on building a proper support for a headdress Professional conservators also adhere to strict ethical codes Like medical doctors they believe in first do no harm Any treatment that a conservator employs must be the possible best for the object at present and with any luck into the future Most conservation work is deliberately designed to be obvious and reversible Sounds counter intuitive at first but here s the logic Object conservation is continuously improving so that the treatment today is currently the best But we know that the future will bring even better technology and tools Should an object need more work in the future that conservator must be able to see where and how past treatment was done in order to remove it and apply better methods Staying in the present current museum collections staff must be able to see where an object has been repaired and might still be vulnerable so as not to further damage the piece Now I hasten to add that this doesn t necessarily mean that conservation work will be so glaringly obvious as to detract

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/conservators-collections-heroes/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Blue Suede Shoes, The Handsomes and You! | BEYONDbones
    have the finesse and character to get anyone on their feet and and rocking to ska reggae funk soul rock or whatever is the next card up their sleeves If a high energy performance where the unexpected is the norm is your idea of the perfect Friday night come to Mixers Elixirs at the Houston Museum of Natural Science from 6 10 p m for an evening to remember Start the evening out right in the Grand Entry Hall at 6 p m with a DJ cocktails and a visit to the Audi Lounge where you can enter to win the Awesome Audi Weekend Sweepstakes Doors open at 7 p m for the live band dancing under the dinosaurs cash bar and complimentary appetizers This week The Handsomes June 26 Make a break for the 80s with Molly The Ringwalds July 3 Holiday Weekend Mixers Resume July 10 July 10 Experience a British Invasion with The Fab 5 Many more fabulous Mixers to come check out mixershouston hmns org for more info 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Science and tagged Elvis HMNS Mixers music The Handsomes by Jamie Bookmark the permalink About Jamie I love my job

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/blue-suede-shoes-the-handsomes-and-you/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Famous Fossil “Ida” (Plate B) Joins Lucy on display in New York | BEYONDbones
    will feature preliminary results from the research recently completed on the Lucy fossil in UT s High Resolution X ray Computed Tomography Facility one of the world s premier labs for this work as well as an interactive experience with Viktor Deak one of the world s leading paleoartists Deak created the 10 foot tall 78 foot long mural representing 6 million years of evolutionary history in Ethiopia check out an online version here that you may have seen when Lucy s Legacy debuted in Houston and he s created brand new paleoart for the exhibit in New York He ll be in the exhibit frequently where visitors can observe him at work ask him questions and learn first hand how he has merged his passions of science and art to communicate an understanding of our prehistoric past as well as how he utilizes modern technology to re create a vision of our beginnings more vivid than ever before Perhaps most exciting we announced today that the newly famed fossil Ida Plate B will also be on display in the Lucy s Legacy exhibition when it opens in New York Officially called Darwinius masillae this 47 million year old fossil is almost unbelievably well preserved providing a window into our primate past when the key adaptations of opposable thumb and big toe had just evolved Hear Dr Robert Bakker visiting curator of paleontology discuss the significance of Plate B of the Ida fossil including preserved fur and stomach contents in the video below Headed to New York this summer Know any science buffs in the area Be a fan of the Lucy s Legacy in Times Square page on Facebook for the latest news photos and video from the exhibition 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Anthropology and

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/famous-fossil-ida-plate-b-joins-lucy-on-display-in-new-york/ (2016-02-12)
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  • HMNS Summer Camps: Survivor | BEYONDbones
    as the desert or in the tropical forests Campers discover how to find water and determine their location from the stars They build their own water filters and make their own insect repellent The kids discuss which animals are dangerous and how to best avoid them They make their own survival kits They also learn how to say S O S in Morse code Campers practice tieing slipknots What survival class would be complete without learning how to make a compass or the best knots to tie Ever wondered what was the best way to build a fire Wonder no more Sign up for Survivor class just one of our many summer camps Just because school is out for the summer doesn t mean your kids can t keep learning Check out our Xploration Summer Camps a fun and educational adventure for your children These week long science classes are available for children ages 5 to 12 from June 1 through August 14 For more information visit our web site at hmns org 0 0 0 This entry was posted in Education and tagged dangerous animals HMNS insect repellant kid science kids summer S O S science for kids science

    Original URL path: http://blog.hmns.org/2009/06/hmns-summer-camps-survivor/ (2016-02-12)
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