archive-org.com » ORG » H » HOSPITALIMPACT.ORG

Total: 785

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Hospital Impact - Dying with dignity: Lessons hospitals can learn from hospice
    that as a sign to start taking shifts and my wife her sister her niece and I kept vigil as others went home to get something to eat Obviously hospice knows a thing or two about dying because less than an hour after most people left Lou passed away It was peaceful I ve never been present when someone died The aide came in and once the death was verified she took the most loving care of this man who she did not know She shaved him and bathed him But it is hard to describe the love she showed while doing it I watched probably more so than my grieving wife and her sister See but for sporadic episodes Lou s hospital care was nothing like his care at death Sure there were some caring staff And there were others in and out just doing their job But the experience was more than staff The environment reflected it He spent 51 days in a room that my wife and her sisters felt compelled to clean He stared at a ceiling vent that was dirty which my sister in law eventually cleaned But not for his family advocating for his care he might have died months before The biggest observation for me was the complete breakdown in communication No one seemed to know what the others were doing That was reflected in his two readmissions to the same hospital prior to the last and final visit It persisted to the last day when the renal doctor came in to say they would be trying dialysis again even while the family s wishes of withdrawing support were documented days before I am not sure what the answers are here I do know that going to the hospital close to you is not always the best choice My in laws chose it because it was just two miles from their Blue Bell Pennsylvania apartment They went there despite numerous lapses in care A lesson to caregivers Do your homework for your older parents show them the facts and politely but firmly suggest they seek care at a high quality hospital I also know that transparency is a good thing and sometimes HCAHPS don t lie This particular hospital thinking that it was doing a good thing by posting their satisfaction scores also reinforced that the score did reflect the care All of the scores I observed were in the 50s Not comforting But maybe the biggest takeaway is for hospitals to take a lesson from the hospice aide who shaved and bathed my father in law after he died The dignity the love and the respect are something we could all emulate And to think we still battle for hospice s rightful place at the healthcare table Anthony Cirillo is president of Fast Forward Consulting which specializes in experience management and strategic marketing for healthcare facilities He also is the expert guide in Assisted Living for About com Leave a comment Please

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/09/10/dying_with_dignity_lessons_hospitals_can (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Hospital Impact - Dying with dignity: Lessons hospitals can learn from hospice
    that as a sign to start taking shifts and my wife her sister her niece and I kept vigil as others went home to get something to eat Obviously hospice knows a thing or two about dying because less than an hour after most people left Lou passed away It was peaceful I ve never been present when someone died The aide came in and once the death was verified she took the most loving care of this man who she did not know She shaved him and bathed him But it is hard to describe the love she showed while doing it I watched probably more so than my grieving wife and her sister See but for sporadic episodes Lou s hospital care was nothing like his care at death Sure there were some caring staff And there were others in and out just doing their job But the experience was more than staff The environment reflected it He spent 51 days in a room that my wife and her sisters felt compelled to clean He stared at a ceiling vent that was dirty which my sister in law eventually cleaned But not for his family advocating for his care he might have died months before The biggest observation for me was the complete breakdown in communication No one seemed to know what the others were doing That was reflected in his two readmissions to the same hospital prior to the last and final visit It persisted to the last day when the renal doctor came in to say they would be trying dialysis again even while the family s wishes of withdrawing support were documented days before I am not sure what the answers are here I do know that going to the hospital close to you is not always the best choice My in laws chose it because it was just two miles from their Blue Bell Pennsylvania apartment They went there despite numerous lapses in care A lesson to caregivers Do your homework for your older parents show them the facts and politely but firmly suggest they seek care at a high quality hospital I also know that transparency is a good thing and sometimes HCAHPS don t lie This particular hospital thinking that it was doing a good thing by posting their satisfaction scores also reinforced that the score did reflect the care All of the scores I observed were in the 50s Not comforting But maybe the biggest takeaway is for hospitals to take a lesson from the hospice aide who shaved and bathed my father in law after he died The dignity the love and the respect are something we could all emulate And to think we still battle for hospice s rightful place at the healthcare table Anthony Cirillo is president of Fast Forward Consulting which specializes in experience management and strategic marketing for healthcare facilities He also is the expert guide in Assisted Living for About com Leave a comment Please

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/09/10/p4816 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hospital Impact - Hospitals must address underlying societal issues
    diseases have their roots in these systemic societal issues And these life obstacles are most likely issues within your own workforce Let s circle back to one of the major issues Caregiving I was humbled and honored to be a part of The Dementia Action Alliance Thought Leaders Summit in Washington District of Columbia in June CCAL of which I m a board member convened 70 of the nation s top leaders in the long term care supports and services arena We are concerned that the National Alzheimer s Plan is heavy on cure and light on care So a big focus of our work centers on person centered care for people with dementia and their caregivers Missing from this table of leaders was the hospital and physician community I urge you to read Sandy Halperin s opening remarks to the assembled leaders Sandy is a friend and he has early onset Alzheimer s Here is a taste of what he said It is time for all of us including all of the legislators around the country to put a stop to these repetitive and recurring conversations of information that is all to well known and acknowledged and to replace this seemingly endless talk with action oriented debates and the funding that is needed to best achieve our nation s dementia care and research goals Quite frankly I don t care whether anybody inside or outside of this room is a Democrat Republican or and Independent or any other party affiliation I don t care whether someone agrees or disagrees with Obamacare this is not about Obamacare it is about our health yes everybody s health with health being at the core of each of our lives and at the core of our nation s health and all of the dementias and dementia care must be a primary part of our nation s healthcare focus It s time for us declare a war on dementia on all of its fronts And this war must revitalize and accelerate what has been accomplished to date In a RAND report on long term care services and supports they note that persons with dementia experience on average more care settings and more transitions between care settings than do older adults with other chronic conditions Hospitals must address societal issues beyond the diagnosis and treatment of disease The hospital industry and the long term care industry operate in silos And while some bundled payment experiments try to unite these disparate systems they miss the mark and ignore the real conversation of care that needs to take place Want to be part of the Dementia Action Alliance You should be Contact me and we can talk cirillo 4wardfast com Anthony Cirillo is president of Fast Forward Consulting which specializes in experience management and strategic marketing for healthcare facilities He also is the expert guide in Assisted Living for About com Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/08/10/hospitals_must_address_underlying_societ (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hospital Impact - Hospitals must address underlying societal issues
    diseases have their roots in these systemic societal issues And these life obstacles are most likely issues within your own workforce Let s circle back to one of the major issues Caregiving I was humbled and honored to be a part of The Dementia Action Alliance Thought Leaders Summit in Washington District of Columbia in June CCAL of which I m a board member convened 70 of the nation s top leaders in the long term care supports and services arena We are concerned that the National Alzheimer s Plan is heavy on cure and light on care So a big focus of our work centers on person centered care for people with dementia and their caregivers Missing from this table of leaders was the hospital and physician community I urge you to read Sandy Halperin s opening remarks to the assembled leaders Sandy is a friend and he has early onset Alzheimer s Here is a taste of what he said It is time for all of us including all of the legislators around the country to put a stop to these repetitive and recurring conversations of information that is all to well known and acknowledged and to replace this seemingly endless talk with action oriented debates and the funding that is needed to best achieve our nation s dementia care and research goals Quite frankly I don t care whether anybody inside or outside of this room is a Democrat Republican or and Independent or any other party affiliation I don t care whether someone agrees or disagrees with Obamacare this is not about Obamacare it is about our health yes everybody s health with health being at the core of each of our lives and at the core of our nation s health and all of the dementias and dementia care must be a primary part of our nation s healthcare focus It s time for us declare a war on dementia on all of its fronts And this war must revitalize and accelerate what has been accomplished to date In a RAND report on long term care services and supports they note that persons with dementia experience on average more care settings and more transitions between care settings than do older adults with other chronic conditions Hospitals must address societal issues beyond the diagnosis and treatment of disease The hospital industry and the long term care industry operate in silos And while some bundled payment experiments try to unite these disparate systems they miss the mark and ignore the real conversation of care that needs to take place Want to be part of the Dementia Action Alliance You should be Contact me and we can talk cirillo 4wardfast com Anthony Cirillo is president of Fast Forward Consulting which specializes in experience management and strategic marketing for healthcare facilities He also is the expert guide in Assisted Living for About com Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/08/10/p4751 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hospital Impact
    know it While it is reimbursable the cost benefit ratio favors practices sticking to what makes them money They need to see the bigger picture The AWV reimburses on average 117 per visit and to capture all of the documentation necessary to financially benefit the practice it requires approximately 45 minutes And if you don t code properly well that s another story Most find the AWV time consuming tedious and a financial burden There is a marketing term called loss leader It s the idea that you provide a product or service that is an enticement to help grow the number of customers you have You may break even or lose money But that is the cost to introduce new people to you For healthcare organizations the gamble is that once they have experienced the care you offer they will come back and tell others Read more Leave a comment Does population health management really account for dementia patients April 8th 2015 by Anthony Cirillo There were many presentations at the March conference of the American College of Healthcare Executives regarding population health management With value based purchasing heating up accountable care organizations forming fast and readmissions a big hot button it s only natural that keeping people well and out of the hospital would be a part of the conversation I am not a clinician but I know enough to understand that population health management has been focused on the chronic conditions that eat up cost challenge access and could be controlled heart disease diabetes or cancer for example But is dementia including Alzheimer s really being addressed in current population health management models I would contend no Read more Leave a comment 3 ways to cultivate a value based mindset March 5th 2015 by Anthony Cirillo I have contended that hospitals are going kicking and screaming into value based purchasing and have surmised that when the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services moves private insurers will follow That s why I find it utterly fascinating that one of our local health systems is in a heated battle with a large insurer that wants to introduce pay for performance into future pricing scenarios The insurer took out multiple full page ads in the daily newspaper It s currently a he said she said debate Stay tuned As we move into bundled payment scenarios and accountable care organizations ACOs I think one of the biggest hurdles we face is changing our mindset Believe me most of my clients are still in a fee for service mentality knowing but not quite acting on the shift in healthcare It s a juggling act and real money is involved But guess what It is the inevitable future and all payers will follow Read more Leave a comment The safety impact of caregiver patient feedback February 11th 2015 by Anthony Cirillo Superficially many people look at the intense focus on patient experience as an effort to keep patients satisfied however that is defined and

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=anthony%20cirillo&page=1&disp=posts&paged=1 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hospital Impact
    right thing When I speak at various conferences and hospital leadership events I dummy down my message about patient experience simply we over complicate it We need to step back catch our breath and use common sense Here are some nonhealthcare examples Read more Leave a comment Caring for the next generation of Alzheimer s patients May 1st 2014 by Anthony Cirillo I attended a Health Affairs briefing for its April issue entitled The Long Arm of Alzheimer s Disease It was eye opening Many participants discussed a cure for the disease but some presenters clearly understood that a cure could be a long time away living with the disease is the bigger issue When we look at people living with the disease it s not just about patient care but also their direct caregivers and other family members It calls for new and perhaps unconventional partnerships For example Laurie Ryan the program director of Alzheimer s Disease Clinical Trials National Institute of Aging National Institutes of Health discussed clinical trial recruitment and the need to find people who are younger and not manifesting the disease Read more Leave a comment The care experience needs empathy April 2nd 2014 by Anthony Cirillo By now you have probably read about my saga Dec 17 my wife s brother passes away my sister is diagnosed with cancer Dec 31 my daughter has baby boy Adam Joseph Jan 15 my sister passes away Feb 7 my son has baby girl Skylar Olivia Feb 22 my mom moves into an independent living residence near me in North Carolina Today try to get back to a normal life Part of settling mom into her new residence was arranging for her first visit with a new primary care physician Here is a little bit about how it went The physician looked over her records before coming into the room At 92 mom has a litany of ailments and medications but using a walker has been her only compromise in recent years When the physician entered he quickly dispensed with the clinical aspects of her care Read more Leave a comment Senior patient experience leaders needed March 20th 2014 by Jason A Wolf This headline is not for a job listing But it should be one you seriously consider I and a number of colleagues from fellow Hospital Impact blogger Anthony Cirillo and first named Chief Experience Officer CXO Bridget Duffy M D continue to stress the importance of having a senior experience leader Early investigations at The Beryl Institute showed that organizations possessing a focused senior experience leader tended to outperform others on standard experience surveys More so our benchmarking research and surveys from other organizations reinforce that patient experience remains a top priority for healthcare leaders Read more Leave a comment Previous Page Next Page Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=anthony%20cirillo&page=1&disp=posts&paged=3 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hospital Impact - Humanity: The heart of patient experience success
    are clear choices to make and these choices are probably far less difficult then we make them out to be I say this not to diminish the critical strategic nature patient experience plays in overall healthcare outcomes and even the financial viability of healthcare organizations or to downplay the core tactics that help ensure our patients feel attended to and cared for These are still central to how patient experience makes a contribution to healthcare overall But perhaps as I return to what I discovered in my review of the year we also must recognize the fundamental needs the patient experience itself reveals In reading great pieces on Hospital Impact from my colleagues such as Thomas Dahlborg Doug Della Pietra Anthony Cirillo and Jenn Riggle as just a few examples what moved us and our conversation as a community of leaders was not only suggestions of practice It was the compelling stories of experience through the eyes of a friend a loved one and even our own that sparked our greatest energy and engagement What I saw in many of those stories moved beyond a discussion of action steps or policy to true moments of interaction and the perceptions they revealed This is where the power of positive patient experience makes itself known I often mention The Beryl Institute s definition of patient experience as a guiding framework for how we can acknowledge and address patient experience the sum of all interactions shaped by an organizationâ s culture that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care What we find beneath the surface of these words is that personal interactions organization culture and perceptions themselves occur not only in tactical ways but also at an emotional level If we try to over systematize the experience process we may lose this most important element The themes I found in looking at this year reveal words that speak to that very humanness at our core in healthcare empathy and compassion caring and communication commitment and hope and yes even love In remembering that these words matter could very well be where we can make the greatest difference in providing the best in patient experience for all As we experience the holiday season and look to the New Year with fresh eyes and joyful hearts perhaps it is these same feelings that should frame the foundation of all we can do in service to patients their families and to one another in healthcare In recognizing our humanity what touches us scares us and inspires us we will without question make the right choices and ensure that our work in the year gone by and our hopes for the year ahead will only lead to the best for our patients Happy Holidays and may the New Year lead us to even greater experiences for all Jason A Wolf Ph D is executive director of The Beryl Institute where he specializes in organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Follow Jason jasonawolf and

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/12/19/title_82 (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hospital Impact - The real outcomes of patient experience excellence in healthcare
    traded entities tout their focus on patient experience above all else In addition to policy and product we also see the expansion of research itself In a simple search of Google Scholar for the term patient experience in research article titles you will find an astronomical increase from just seven in all of 2000 to 11 in 2005 to now 261 in a 2015 not yet over That is an increase of almost 2 300 percent in a decade This alignment of focus in policy consumer and research streams all return us to one simple point Experience is no longer a fad but now is central to what we look to achieve in healthcare So what are the outcomes we can and will drive with a focus on experience excellence I offer four central ideas which the growing literature and evidence is showing to ring true When we focus on experience in the broadest sense I suggest we can and do achieve the four outcomes all healthcare leaders aspire to They include Positive clinical outcomes The Beryl Institute s benchmarking research reported clinical outcomes as most impacted by patient experience excellence and a growing body of evidence shows the positive clinical effects of a great experience Strong financial outcomes Examinations of the financial benefits of experience excellence are expanding as well and an understanding of readmissions and other reimbursement implications all drive the conversation that experience is a bottom line issue Strong consumer brand loyalty As in any industry positive experience creates not just positive encounters but lasting memories and expanded commitments People make choices as consumers to go where they are treated with dignity and respect and where they get the highest quality experience In a value based world consumer choice matters even more and cannot be left to chance Positive community reputation As much as healthcare is a national or even global issue it also remains strongly tied to its local roots Healthcare organizations are highly visible parts of their communities and their standing comes not just from event sponsorships or presence but from the very outcomes they offer and the stories these generate in the communities they serve Reputation drives choices and is driven by the best in experience While I offer these four outcomes as distinct points it should be acknowledged that they are deeply linked as the effects of one have strong ripples on the others If we strive to maintain and even elevate the focus on experience excellence in our healthcare organizations it is important we move beyond this discussion as something nice to do to something we must do And if we agree that a strong experience effort has far reaching implications and the potential for the most fundamental outcomes in healthcare then the case should be easy to make and the argument short at best An investment in a strong and positive patient experience is the leading choice we can and should be making in healthcare today The results of this decision

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/12/03/the_real_outcomes_of_patient_experience (2016-02-10)
    Open archived version from archive



  •