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  • Hospital Impact - The consumer has spoken: Patient experience matters
    driven by policy and mandate influenced by a reimbursement system that the typical healthcare consumer is not even aware exists And while these changes did cause shifts in behaviors organizationally they garnered minimal public attention Yet the improvements made in CAHPS scores in recent years are observable the surveys have moved us in their own limited way to a stronger focus on interaction This is only managed through the people and organizations engaged in our healthcare systems themselves I continue to hear healthcare leader provider and caregiver alike reinforce that the culture of an organization matters in patient experience excellence Perhaps we are experiencing a cultural renaissance in healthcare itself Our most recent global research at The Beryl Institute on the state of patient experience reinforced the notion that culture was a major factor in experience success It is why it was placed and remains at the heart of the definition of patient experience itself But why does any of this matter and what should cause us to look and listen as healthcare leaders The reality now is that consumers are more aware than ever of their role in the healthcare conversation Along with incredible patient advocates and leaders that continue to raise important issues for healthcare end users a great example being the critical effort to reinforce the importance of patient and family access to their own health information the market in general is listening and acting In just the five years since launching The Beryl Institute we have seen a meteoric increase in identified research focused on patient experience from tens to hundreds of efforts annually There has been an unquestionable emergence of new resources vendors products and services and even efforts to grow major patient experience focused corporate entities And perhaps most significantly there has been a rapid rise of patient experience being addressed in the public media Just last month when the reported CAHPS data evolved beyond listed percentages and data tables to user friendly star ratings the press was stirred There was and continues to be coverage in national regional and local press about how many stars healthcare organizations have received And while some may and do debate the merit of this reporting methodology it has become a tangible means by which the healthcare consumer is now informed Patient experience at least in the sense of this new presentation of the data has become newsworthy and without question a more public resource than ever before We closed our 2015 State of Patient Experience study with a simple pair of questions for healthcare consumers globally To the first 87 percent of respondents identified patient experience as extremely important to them To the second 67 percent said patient experience would be extremely significant with 28 percent saying somewhat significant in making healthcare decisions When we link this data reality from the voice of patients and families to the expanding coverage of experience information in the news we can only draw one conclusion patient experience matters It always

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/05/28/the_consumer_has_spoken_patient_experien (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Patient and family engagement: Healthcare's two-way street
    of people around the world are having a healthcare experience in clinical and non clinical settings and the spaces in between We have the opportunity to either actively make that experience inclusive of all voices or let it happen on its own Engagement in healthcare is not and should not be a passive concept Rather healthcare organizations must constantly create opportunities in which people feel invited and welcomed to engage and contribute They too must recognize engagement is ultimately an individual s choice I ll share a recent personal experience to highlight this perspective I was scheduled for a physical exam with my primary care physician I had to wait for almost four months for this wellness visit appointment Two days prior to my appointment I received a thoughtful automated voice mail reminding me of my appointment time and informing me of my responsibility to be on time and also noting there could be potential costs for a missed appointment On the day of my appointment I arose early to an ice storm as many did last month as I began my pre appointment fast With the bad weather I decided it best to contact the physician s office to confirm the appointment and I called just after the office s scheduled opening hours The phone rang endlessly without response and after 25 minutes of trying the phone was answered by the answering service for the practice In inquiring about my appointment I was told Sir all I can tell you is the office will be closed today In asking about my appointment the response was You will need to call back and talk to scheduling for a future appointment I am sorry we cannot help you with that I am not questioning the work of the answering service or even the decisions to close for the safety of all involved Rather I look at the experience provided by the office itself In acknowledging what we aspire to achieve via patient and family engagement I was an engaged patient But my experience was at best frustrating and even inconsiderate I have yet to receive a call about my appointment or any effort to reschedule That too has been left to me Engagement is not something we can or should just expect of patients and families Engagement from this perspective is a two way street We create the best opportunities for engagement by committing to provide the best in experience for all those we work with care for and serve This is why contributions such as the important work shared above are critical as we continue to expand the conversation I also hope we remember that accountability for engagement and ultimately experience is in each and every one of our hands That is the ultimate roadmap as we strive to create the best in healthcare outcomes for all involved Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute a global community of practice focused on patient experience improvement and

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/03/19/patient_and_family_engagement_healthcare (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - The real outcomes of patient experience excellence in healthcare
    traded entities tout their focus on patient experience above all else In addition to policy and product we also see the expansion of research itself In a simple search of Google Scholar for the term patient experience in research article titles you will find an astronomical increase from just seven in all of 2000 to 11 in 2005 to now 261 in a 2015 not yet over That is an increase of almost 2 300 percent in a decade This alignment of focus in policy consumer and research streams all return us to one simple point Experience is no longer a fad but now is central to what we look to achieve in healthcare So what are the outcomes we can and will drive with a focus on experience excellence I offer four central ideas which the growing literature and evidence is showing to ring true When we focus on experience in the broadest sense I suggest we can and do achieve the four outcomes all healthcare leaders aspire to They include Positive clinical outcomes The Beryl Institute s benchmarking research reported clinical outcomes as most impacted by patient experience excellence and a growing body of evidence shows the positive clinical effects of a great experience Strong financial outcomes Examinations of the financial benefits of experience excellence are expanding as well and an understanding of readmissions and other reimbursement implications all drive the conversation that experience is a bottom line issue Strong consumer brand loyalty As in any industry positive experience creates not just positive encounters but lasting memories and expanded commitments People make choices as consumers to go where they are treated with dignity and respect and where they get the highest quality experience In a value based world consumer choice matters even more and cannot be left to chance Positive community reputation As much as healthcare is a national or even global issue it also remains strongly tied to its local roots Healthcare organizations are highly visible parts of their communities and their standing comes not just from event sponsorships or presence but from the very outcomes they offer and the stories these generate in the communities they serve Reputation drives choices and is driven by the best in experience While I offer these four outcomes as distinct points it should be acknowledged that they are deeply linked as the effects of one have strong ripples on the others If we strive to maintain and even elevate the focus on experience excellence in our healthcare organizations it is important we move beyond this discussion as something nice to do to something we must do And if we agree that a strong experience effort has far reaching implications and the potential for the most fundamental outcomes in healthcare then the case should be easy to make and the argument short at best An investment in a strong and positive patient experience is the leading choice we can and should be making in healthcare today The results of this decision

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/12/03/p5701 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - In five years, the patient experience movement has come a long way
    of quality safety and service to those receiving and engaging in the delivery of care Active and growing commitment to engaging patient and family voice This is more than a focus on patient and family engagement in their care but also a recognition that patient and family voices matter in not only individual care plans but in how we can operate our organizations overall to provide the best in experience The increase in the use of patient and family advisory councils and the acknowledgement that the voice of the consumer matters in more than just surveys signify a significant shift that successful organizations are embracing In fact this has motivated The Beryl Institute community ourselves to establish a growing and vibrant Patient Family Advisory Community just this year We are all learning together Acknowledgement that experience efforts drive better outcomes overall The 2015 study showed that patient experience is now recognized for the outcomes it drives not just the practices it comprises Respondents shared that clinical outcomes was far and above the top identified item affected by a positive patient and family experience This finding reflects a profound shift in experience as a tangential idea about amenities being nice or the soft stuff to a healthcare reality that drives real tangible and critical results Experience happens at all points across the continuum and in the spaces in between While experience efforts have often focused on the four walls of the clinical encounter on such critical ideas as clinical excellence effective communication or reducing suffering what we see is that experience is encompassing of all that and more Those traveling the healthcare journey have countless interactions the concept at the heart of the definition of patient experience itself and we must diligently manage all of those touch points personal encounters transition spaces and moments of truth In reflecting on all of these active opportunities for healthcare perhaps most importantly we need to return to the voice of those who are engaging in healthcare around the world Regardless of the words your organization uses from patients and families to customer or consumer the recipients of care around the world are speaking and I believe as a result are influencing action as much if not more than just policy motivation In 2015 consumers of care shared that patient experience was extremely important to them 87 percent and was an extremely significant factor in their healthcare decision making 67 percent That means we have great opportunity ahead to not only put these organizational considerations in place and reinforce our focus on the importance of experience excellence but also to continue to understand what is important for those we serve across our care environments We must also be diligent in engaging and supporting those who deliver the healthcare experience as well our staff nurses and physicians Theirs hearts and voices are critical as well as we continue to tackle the expanding reality and impact of patient experience today I fully believe and the data reveal

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/09/17/title_138 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Patient experience: 4 strategies of the new healthcare reality
    emerging in support of stronger patient experience performance overall A clear organizational definition for patient experience The Institute s benchmarking study discovered that while almost 70 percent of hospitals have a formal structure for addressing patient experience only 27 percent have a formal definition We would not pursue new service line strategies without a clear purpose so what makes patient experience any different Organizations should consider adopting or adapting the Institute s definition of patient experience the sum of all interactions shaped by an organization s culture that impact patient perceptions across the continuum of care A focused role to support patient experience efforts In our recent paper The Four Cornerstones of an Effective Patient Experience the conventional wisdom that focus leads to outcomes was reinforced as those facilities with a focused role and defined time committed to patient experience efforts tended to outperform on HCAHPS scores by significant margins A recognition that patient experience is more than just a survey My visits to hospitals across the United States have shown me that the greatest outcomes are realized by those facilities that address the actual experience versus just the required survey questions At Inova Fair Oaks Hospital in Virginia by building a foundation of service culture and sharing a broad vision of the patient experience journey it helps patients feel they are individuals to be cared for versus cases to be managed The result a consistent likelihood to recommend score of greater than 80 percent over the last few years A commitment at the highest levels of leadership It may seem cliché to say it starts at the top but the benchmarking study revealed that the top driver of patient experience success recognized by more than 72 percent of respondents was strong visible support from the top This is reinforced by Dr David Feinberg CEO of UCLA Health System who shares that his leadership team takes the time to walk the floors daily engaging staff patients and family as part of its overall commitment to healing humankind one patient at a time These ideas provide a framework for successful efforts taking place throughout healthcare organizations today but it takes more than checking off a list of four actions to achieve success Patient experience performance and yes survey outcomes and financial rewards are all tied to a healthcare organization s willingness to make patient experience more than just an initiative This is our new reality Patient experience as a part of our healthcare environment is here to stay Jason A Wolf Ph D is executive director of The Beryl Institute the global community of practice and premier thoughtleader on improving the patient experience He is a passionate champion and recognized expert on organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2011/11/03/patient_experience_the_new_healthcare_re (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - In five years, the patient experience movement has come a long way
    of quality safety and service to those receiving and engaging in the delivery of care Active and growing commitment to engaging patient and family voice This is more than a focus on patient and family engagement in their care but also a recognition that patient and family voices matter in not only individual care plans but in how we can operate our organizations overall to provide the best in experience The increase in the use of patient and family advisory councils and the acknowledgement that the voice of the consumer matters in more than just surveys signify a significant shift that successful organizations are embracing In fact this has motivated The Beryl Institute community ourselves to establish a growing and vibrant Patient Family Advisory Community just this year We are all learning together Acknowledgement that experience efforts drive better outcomes overall The 2015 study showed that patient experience is now recognized for the outcomes it drives not just the practices it comprises Respondents shared that clinical outcomes was far and above the top identified item affected by a positive patient and family experience This finding reflects a profound shift in experience as a tangential idea about amenities being nice or the soft stuff to a healthcare reality that drives real tangible and critical results Experience happens at all points across the continuum and in the spaces in between While experience efforts have often focused on the four walls of the clinical encounter on such critical ideas as clinical excellence effective communication or reducing suffering what we see is that experience is encompassing of all that and more Those traveling the healthcare journey have countless interactions the concept at the heart of the definition of patient experience itself and we must diligently manage all of those touch points personal encounters transition spaces and moments of truth In reflecting on all of these active opportunities for healthcare perhaps most importantly we need to return to the voice of those who are engaging in healthcare around the world Regardless of the words your organization uses from patients and families to customer or consumer the recipients of care around the world are speaking and I believe as a result are influencing action as much if not more than just policy motivation In 2015 consumers of care shared that patient experience was extremely important to them 87 percent and was an extremely significant factor in their healthcare decision making 67 percent That means we have great opportunity ahead to not only put these organizational considerations in place and reinforce our focus on the importance of experience excellence but also to continue to understand what is important for those we serve across our care environments We must also be diligent in engaging and supporting those who deliver the healthcare experience as well our staff nurses and physicians Theirs hearts and voices are critical as well as we continue to tackle the expanding reality and impact of patient experience today I fully believe and the data reveal

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/09/17/p5669 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Why I fired my doctor--and he doesn't even know
    get through to confirm a voice finally answered the phone abruptly with the name of the practice and before I could ask anything I was notified that I was unable to speak with anyone at this time as the practice was closed I asked about the potential to reschedule and if there was someone to speak with at the practice and was simply told all I know is they are not there now so I would try calling them tomorrow Now it may have been my hunger reacting my frustration of waiting welling up or perhaps it was the string of planned phone calls reminding me of my appointment that finally struck a chord but I was angry Not at the idea the office would close for the safety of its staff but at the fact that after I waited prepped and tried to connect the practice made no proactive attempt to let me know IT needed to cancel on me For an organization that could automate communications I wondered why could it not have managed that now I thought of the other individuals perhaps trying to show up at the clinic driving in horrible weather due to an urgent need or the desire not to miss an appointment only to arrive to a closed sign At that moment whether justified or not I fired my doc and I am sure he doesn t even know perhaps until now Some may consider this rash others even whiny but for me it was the principles on which we have continued to expand the dialogue on patient experience across the continuum Healthcare is a two way street and expectations and communication are fundamental to the work we do In this case that simple but important reality was overlooked and for me it was just enough to cause me to look elsewhere How any times is this happening for any number of reasons in healthcare today I write this not as a critique of physicians or physician practices but as an example how even an organization striving to do the right thing can miss something so fundamental Encouragingly enough in the most recent State of Patient Experience research we now see patient experience appearing as the top priority for physician practices and remaining so across all segments of the continuum We also found that practices saw quality and clinical outcomes as the most impacted by a strong experience effort followed by the level of customer service The bottom line is that for all we do and try in patient experience we always may find vulnerable spots In my case a weakness exposed in a unique situation may not have been easy to prepare for but it was one in which there was still an opportunity to have a positive impact In fact in the days following the appointment I assumed was cancelled as the practice were closed I never received a follow up call of any sort to reschedule apologize for the situation

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/08/27/why_i_fired_my_doctor_and_he_doesn_t_eve (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Why I fired my doctor--and he doesn't even know
    get through to confirm a voice finally answered the phone abruptly with the name of the practice and before I could ask anything I was notified that I was unable to speak with anyone at this time as the practice was closed I asked about the potential to reschedule and if there was someone to speak with at the practice and was simply told all I know is they are not there now so I would try calling them tomorrow Now it may have been my hunger reacting my frustration of waiting welling up or perhaps it was the string of planned phone calls reminding me of my appointment that finally struck a chord but I was angry Not at the idea the office would close for the safety of its staff but at the fact that after I waited prepped and tried to connect the practice made no proactive attempt to let me know IT needed to cancel on me For an organization that could automate communications I wondered why could it not have managed that now I thought of the other individuals perhaps trying to show up at the clinic driving in horrible weather due to an urgent need or the desire not to miss an appointment only to arrive to a closed sign At that moment whether justified or not I fired my doc and I am sure he doesn t even know perhaps until now Some may consider this rash others even whiny but for me it was the principles on which we have continued to expand the dialogue on patient experience across the continuum Healthcare is a two way street and expectations and communication are fundamental to the work we do In this case that simple but important reality was overlooked and for me it was just enough to cause me to look elsewhere How any times is this happening for any number of reasons in healthcare today I write this not as a critique of physicians or physician practices but as an example how even an organization striving to do the right thing can miss something so fundamental Encouragingly enough in the most recent State of Patient Experience research we now see patient experience appearing as the top priority for physician practices and remaining so across all segments of the continuum We also found that practices saw quality and clinical outcomes as the most impacted by a strong experience effort followed by the level of customer service The bottom line is that for all we do and try in patient experience we always may find vulnerable spots In my case a weakness exposed in a unique situation may not have been easy to prepare for but it was one in which there was still an opportunity to have a positive impact In fact in the days following the appointment I assumed was cancelled as the practice were closed I never received a follow up call of any sort to reschedule apologize for the situation

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/08/27/p5656 (2016-02-10)
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