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  • Hospital Impact - How to address burnout among medical professionals
    insurance coverage for mental health and chemical dependency care family leave policies so that conflicts between home and work can be resolved informal staff and family events such as picnics retreats or potluck suppers and probably most important the encouragement of away from the examining room activities including walking or jogging on hospital rooftop tracks swimming and even music therapy and meditation This same sentiment is echoed in a recent article in The Atlantic When Dr Mary Brandt a pediatric surgeon and professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston gives lectures to medical students she often adds pointers on healthy eating and lifestyle she says This sort of advice about well being over the long haul of a medical career wasn t provided when she was a student or surgical resident One of my best friends is an astronaut she explains Nutrition exercise self care and being well is part of her job Among that group it s unthinkable that you wouldn t take care of yourself because that would put your team at risk precious information for today s overtaxed doctors and nurses An alternate view Combat burnout not by reducing stress but by promoting professional fulfillment A contrasting article also from The Atlantic offers a different solution to the burnout problem Unfortunately individuals and organizations often respond to burnout by recommending coping strategies focusing on the reduction of stress While reducing stressors in the work environment may offer real benefit it does not get at the problem s real roots Instead of merely reducing the bad in medical practice we need to enhance the good it advises According to the article this approach is rooted in the work of the late Frederick Herzberg a psychologist at the University of Utah Herzberg found that if individuals feel ashamed of their workplace unfairly treated or undercompensated their level of satisfaction will suffer Yes reducing dissatisfiers will reduce workers level of dissatisfaction but this does little or nothing to enhance intrinsic fulfillment To enhance fulfillment and quality of work it is necessary to focus on the work itself In the case of medicine do physicians recognize what they find most fulfilling What does their best work look like Are they making full use of their knowledge skills and innate abilities Are they growing and developing as human beings Do they feel that they are making a real difference in the lives of their patients and communities If not burnout is practically inevitable Good news Today s crop of doctors seems better able to cope Even though burnout is a very real problem in medicine today the situation is not all bleak The current generation gets it completely Brandt says in the aforementioned Atlantic article Wellness is common vernacular for trainees now In the past you d be considered weak if you discussed your fatigue or needs Now it s understood that the best way to take care of your patients is to take care of yourself Truer words never spoken

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2016/01/07/p5717 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - In healthcare, better data early means better outcomes later
    26 percent reduction in the rate of potentially preventable complications infections and other conditions that patients acquire while being treated none of which they expect or deserve More Data particularly a focus on the coding process during patient intake has been among several factors driving the improvement Under Maryland s model hospitals are required to reduce both potentially preventable complications and readmissions goals that have generated the development of innovative and effective practices For example when patients are diagnosed with one of a select 65 potentially preventable complications many hospitals undertake a second more intensive review of that patient s conditions and treatment plan The idea is that a more complete picture of the patient s health better informs both short and long term clinical decisions Of course obtaining accurate patient data from the outset is just the start of successful treatment Maryland s hospitals have also revamped care delivery procedures Examples range from the complex like the creation of multidisciplinary teams to specialize in treating specific illnesses to the simple like changing computer screensavers to two hour countdown clocks so nurses can be reminded when to shift patients positions in their beds In addition to the reduction in potentially preventable complications in hospital mortality rates are down 21 percent volume among high utilizers has decreased more than 5 percent and readmissions rates are declining faster than the nation as a whole These improvements are valuable enough in and of themselves but there s another bonus derived from the focus on accurately capturing data early on it significantly improves the reliability of that data For all the grand promises that Big Data has made to improve healthcare its lifespan has been riddled with obstacles from human error to IT challenges to data overload Because Maryland s all payer model relies on the accuracy of its data to be successful it means hospitals have a strong baseline of knowledge about their patients and can design and implement practices that meet the needs of those patients Even these gains are only a starting point No single hospital is experiencing wild success on all measures and there s much work to be done to identify valuable and reliable data and then connect it with clinical care delivery Still one thing is certain the more reliable information caregivers have early on the better care they can provide Carmela Coyle is president and CEO of the Maryland Hospital Association Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2016/01/07/in_healthcare_better_data_early_means_be (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    percent of traditional Medicare payments will be tied to quality or value through models like accountable care organizations or bundled payments by the end of 2016 50 percent of payments will be tied to these models by the end of 2018 The U S Department of Health and Human Services has a goal of tying 90 percent of all traditional Medicare payments to quality or value by the end of 2018 through programs like Hospital Value Based Purchasing and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction programs Read more Leave a comment Health Enterprise Zones give population health a boost April 8th 2015 by Carmela Coyle As the national movement away from fee for service healthcare the seismic transformation from volume to value gains steam hospitals are beginning to understand on a deeper level that keeping entire communities healthy is an effort that almost literally takes a village While many hospitals are forming organic relationships with community partners like primary care physicians skilled nursing facilities health departments social service agencies and others here in Maryland hospitals have found a another dedicated partner in the state government A little more than a year ago Maryland s health secretary designated five Health Enterprise Zones HEZs areas throughout the state with traditionally poor health outcomes that needed a boost Read more Leave a comment How hospitals can walk the walk in promoting healthier lifestyles January 7th 2015 by Carmela Coyle Recently and independently of one another a handful of hospitals in Maryland have instituted human resources policies that ban the hiring of tobacco users To some critics policies like these represent a slippery slope that could lead hospitals and other employers to become more aggressive in policing their employees behaviors such as whether they like to indulge in double cheeseburgers skydiving or a few glasses of wine in the evening But to hospitals particularly here in Maryland the bans are not nearly as Orwellian as some might claim Rather they are a natural extension of the powerful tool that is helping all of us in the healthcare field reach the Triple Aim population health management The trend of hospitals not hiring tobacco users is nothing new The New York Times wrote about it nearly four years ago and major providers throughout the country including Cleveland Clinic Baylor Health System and WellSpan have similar practices Read more Leave a comment The new rules of patient engagement October 9th 2014 by Carmela Coyle In boardrooms at universities and in executive offices throughout the U S top healthcare leaders have worked feverishly for years to combat escalating healthcare costs and middling if not downright poor health outcomes when compared to other nations The efforts resulted in a number of innovative experiments in different states The outcomes remain to be seen but one of the early findings suggests that healthcare providers have failed to engage patients and in effect make them full partners in their own healthcare Patient engagement at its heart is a simple concept empowering the people in

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?s=carmella+coyle&sentence=AND (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Maryland results prove healthcare partnerships can improve care quality
    end of 2018 through programs like Hospital Value Based Purchasing and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction programs More Of course these initiatives serve the Triple Aim of healthcare lower per capita costs improved patient experience and healthier communities And they re in line with the core mission of every healthcare organization in the nation which is to care for those in need Somewhere along the line too many healthcare providers lost sight of that mission and of their patients But there s no debate that how well we treat our patients will be the dominant factor in future success What does this mean for hospitals Three main things First the paradigm has shifted and the change from volume to value is irrevocable Second the people who benefit most from these changes are our patients collectively And third that working together is not only necessary to succeed in this new environment but is the right thing to do to make sure people receive the right care at the right time in the right setting In today s world of healthcare hospital discharges are obsolete In their place are warm handoffs in which hospitals take extraordinary care to communicate patients needs to whomever is responsible for their next steps And these relationships are reciprocal Long term care facilities home health providers and others are willing and eager to cooperate with hospitals like never before They share hospitals belief that the best care requires the expertise of all settings to work in concert Here in Maryland operating under a unique agreement with the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services hospitals have made great strides in the quality of care by fostering new and innovative partnerships In the first year under this agreement hospitals have Reduced the readmissions rate by 0 80 percent faster than the nation as a whole Reduced the cost of potentially avoidable utilization by nearly 7 percent Reduced admissions from the emergency department by nearly 4 percent This success was only possible because of collaboration among primary care physicians long term care facilities home health operators and others There is much experimentation around healthcare partnerships but amid the uncertainty that comes with any new venture is a very inspiring idea that different organizations no matter where they sit along the care continuum are committed to caring for the whole spectrum of their patients needs Carmela Coyle is president and CEO of the Maryland Hospital Association Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/06/04/p5511 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - In healthcare, better data early means better outcomes later
    26 percent reduction in the rate of potentially preventable complications infections and other conditions that patients acquire while being treated none of which they expect or deserve More Data particularly a focus on the coding process during patient intake has been among several factors driving the improvement Under Maryland s model hospitals are required to reduce both potentially preventable complications and readmissions goals that have generated the development of innovative and effective practices For example when patients are diagnosed with one of a select 65 potentially preventable complications many hospitals undertake a second more intensive review of that patient s conditions and treatment plan The idea is that a more complete picture of the patient s health better informs both short and long term clinical decisions Of course obtaining accurate patient data from the outset is just the start of successful treatment Maryland s hospitals have also revamped care delivery procedures Examples range from the complex like the creation of multidisciplinary teams to specialize in treating specific illnesses to the simple like changing computer screensavers to two hour countdown clocks so nurses can be reminded when to shift patients positions in their beds In addition to the reduction in potentially preventable complications in hospital mortality rates are down 21 percent volume among high utilizers has decreased more than 5 percent and readmissions rates are declining faster than the nation as a whole These improvements are valuable enough in and of themselves but there s another bonus derived from the focus on accurately capturing data early on it significantly improves the reliability of that data For all the grand promises that Big Data has made to improve healthcare its lifespan has been riddled with obstacles from human error to IT challenges to data overload Because Maryland s all payer model relies on the accuracy of its data to be successful it means hospitals have a strong baseline of knowledge about their patients and can design and implement practices that meet the needs of those patients Even these gains are only a starting point No single hospital is experiencing wild success on all measures and there s much work to be done to identify valuable and reliable data and then connect it with clinical care delivery Still one thing is certain the more reliable information caregivers have early on the better care they can provide Carmela Coyle is president and CEO of the Maryland Hospital Association Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2016/01/07/p5715 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    December 24th 2015 by Ilene MacDonald Earlier this year I wrote about the frustrating experience my family had trying to navigate the healthcare system and coordinate care for a relative after he fell ill needed emergency surgery and then had complications that meant an extended stay in the intensive care unit Although he received good care and ultimately recovered it was clear that the hospital could have done a better job communicating with his caregivers and making sure they understood what was happening throughout his stay and after his discharge This week my family experienced a health emergency that involved another relative and a different hospital over a three day period It began on Sunday when he experienced what turned out to be a grand mal seizure due to a rare complication to an antibiotic that he was on for a minor skin infection After several hours in the emergency room he was admitted overnight as an inpatient and later transferred to the cardiac unit Once again my family is grateful for the care our loved one received those three days But the experience illustrated what works well within hospitals and where there is still room for improvement Fierce has written about these issues before and they are worth repeating Read the full commentary at FierceHealthcare Leave a comment New healthcare costs study has major implications for hospital leaders December 17th 2015 by Kent Bottles A major new study showing that hospital prices vary enormously between different American cities will impact the strategy of all hospital executives and call into question one of the theories behind the Affordable Care Act Aetna Humana and UnitedHealth contributed data on the spending and utilization of 92 billion health insurance claims from 88 million Americans who have employer sponsored health insurance Virtually everything we know about health spending and most of the basis for federal health policy comes from the analysis of Medicare data says Yale University s Zack Cooper who is a co author of the new study The rub is that Medicare only covers 16 percent of the population The majority of individuals 60 percent of the U S population receive healthcare coverage from private insurers This new dataset really allows us to understand what influences health spending for the majority of Americans This information is critical to creating better public policy Read more Leave a comment Has the healthcare industry learned from the Ebola outbreak December 17th 2015 by Susan Dolan A year ago when we were at the peak of the Ebola crisis the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology APIC surveyed more than a 1 000 of its infection preventionist members working in U S acute care hospitals and found that only 6 percent felt that their hospitals were well prepared to receive a patient who may have Ebola One year later in September 2015 APIC re surveyed its members to see how the needle had moved The good news is that the number of respondents who

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/?blog=1&page=1&disp=posts&paged=4 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    December 24th 2015 by Ilene MacDonald Earlier this year I wrote about the frustrating experience my family had trying to navigate the healthcare system and coordinate care for a relative after he fell ill needed emergency surgery and then had complications that meant an extended stay in the intensive care unit Although he received good care and ultimately recovered it was clear that the hospital could have done a better job communicating with his caregivers and making sure they understood what was happening throughout his stay and after his discharge This week my family experienced a health emergency that involved another relative and a different hospital over a three day period It began on Sunday when he experienced what turned out to be a grand mal seizure due to a rare complication to an antibiotic that he was on for a minor skin infection After several hours in the emergency room he was admitted overnight as an inpatient and later transferred to the cardiac unit Once again my family is grateful for the care our loved one received those three days But the experience illustrated what works well within hospitals and where there is still room for improvement Fierce has written about these issues before and they are worth repeating Read the full commentary at FierceHealthcare Leave a comment New healthcare costs study has major implications for hospital leaders December 17th 2015 by Kent Bottles A major new study showing that hospital prices vary enormously between different American cities will impact the strategy of all hospital executives and call into question one of the theories behind the Affordable Care Act Aetna Humana and UnitedHealth contributed data on the spending and utilization of 92 billion health insurance claims from 88 million Americans who have employer sponsored health insurance Virtually everything we know about health spending and most of the basis for federal health policy comes from the analysis of Medicare data says Yale University s Zack Cooper who is a co author of the new study The rub is that Medicare only covers 16 percent of the population The majority of individuals 60 percent of the U S population receive healthcare coverage from private insurers This new dataset really allows us to understand what influences health spending for the majority of Americans This information is critical to creating better public policy Read more Leave a comment Has the healthcare industry learned from the Ebola outbreak December 17th 2015 by Susan Dolan A year ago when we were at the peak of the Ebola crisis the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology APIC surveyed more than a 1 000 of its infection preventionist members working in U S acute care hospitals and found that only 6 percent felt that their hospitals were well prepared to receive a patient who may have Ebola One year later in September 2015 APIC re surveyed its members to see how the needle had moved The good news is that the number of respondents who

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&page=1&disp=posts&paged=4 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Optimal healing environment encourages community wellness
    focus on our community s health wellness and well being the ideas came from everywhere well at least once people realized we were not losing our mind The Pathway to Discovery serves as one practical element of an optimal healing environment OHE based on Samueli Instituteâ s framework It focuses on healing spaces It will include A functional clinically integrated outdoor rehabilitation space for physical occupational and speech therapy A pathway with exercise stations leading to our on campus pond and walking path A healing garden next to our women s care entrance An employee entrance park based on an urban park setting in Savannah Georgia A renovated courtyard phase 2 based on the historic Paley Park in New York City We also had a chance to celebrate with our community and showcase our current Arts in Healthcare Exhibit and Food is Medicine Exhibition two additional elements of an OHE By Thanksgiving this first phase should be complete enjoy it if you are running our Turkey Trot We invite you to visit and understand how you can easily transfer similar aspects to your organization Provide your influence now Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/11/06/optimal_healing_environment_encourages_c (2016-02-10)
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