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  • Hospital Impact - Patient experience: Healthcare's shared global conversation
    care there are not crisply delineated segments of care i e quality safety or service or even aims regarding cost outcomes or care experiences These ideas are all part of one experience in healthcare People want safe quality encounters where they are treated with dignity and respect and they worry about costs and are impacted by broader population outcomes which drive the choices involved in their own care experience More I do not suggest we erase this segmentation as it allows those of us working to provide and improve healthcare to identify and take actions on needed areas of improvement However we have the opportunity to understand that it is the collective efforts in these areas that truly frame the patient experience It is for this reason we continue that very research started in 2011 At this moment we again are seeking to gather input on the state of experience in healthcare but as the conversation has evolved so have the participants This year s exploration includes the voices of those from physician practices acute and pediatric care and the long term care environment and for the first time gathers input from those on the receiving end of care the patients residents families and support networks who are engaging in the healthcare system We have seen this conversation expand globally in healthcare and while systemic structural and operational issues may vary and policy guidance or national priorities differ there is one thing that seemingly holds true The discourse on the experience in healthcare the integration of the key elements that shape perception are grounded in culture and are created at the point of interaction be it clinical or personal physical or virtual is truly a shared global conversation It is a conversation we can and must continue to expand share from and engage in to ensure the best in outcomes for all who are in our care and for those providing it For that reason I invite you as reader your colleagues and peers and your organization to participate in this latest exploration on the state of patient resident and family experience Please take a few moments to offer your insights and participate in the survey here In contributing to this global investigation we will begin to identify trends and paint a more complete picture of how we are addressing the healthcare experience around the world This is truly healthcare s global conversation one that touches the lives of countless individuals and not only has the potential but already is changing the nature of healthcare for all engaged Please provide your input today Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute a global community of practice focused on patient experience improvement and founding editor of Patient Experience Journal Follow Jason jasonawolf The Beryl Institute berylinstitute and Patient Experience Journal pxjournal on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/02/18/patient_experience_healthcare_s_shared_g (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Why the patient experience movement will continue
    Experience videos so many healthcare organizations are creating One chief nursing officer shared with me that creating her organization s video reinforced more than any training mandate or memo the role everyone plays and the accountability they have in providing the best in experience Perhaps as equally indicative has been the growth of the patient experience community itself From the more than15 000 members and guests of The Beryl Institute to the efforts supported by governments providers and vendor organizations around the world the conversation continues to expand And this has expanded the range of voices that are part of the conversation Healthcare leadership patient experience leadership frontline staff patients and families physicians community members and researchers have all come together to send a powerfully consistent message The key lessons I hear across these groups have been profoundly aligned Healthcare leaders stressed patient experience is a living breathing and dynamic process not an initiative one can ever say is complete Caregivers and staff reinforced patient experience is about consistent and ongoing action It must become part of who we are as healthcare organizations Students our future leaders suggested we need to put our efforts where our priorities are noting while patient experience is important the learning around it needs to be increased Patients and families requested that we acknowledge they are not subjects but rather partners in the healthcare experience We need to invite their voice and we need to listen In the end the message is strong and true patient experience is a powerful and growing movement As this blog publishes I am with more than 500 healthcare leaders at Patient Experience Conference 2013 engaging in a true community dialogue on how we can ensure this movement continues to flourish It comes down to basic principles we all need to remember No one be it a provider organization vendor media outlet owns the patient experience Its strength comes from the collective voices of all engaged It is through collaboration i e the sharing of ideas openly that we can most positively impact the experience of patients and families globally While improving the patient experience may be more common sense than science we must never stop looking for ways to innovate find new approaches and engage all voices along the way We are ALL the patient experience and must act as such We all have profound contributions to make and it will take that type of commitment to have the greatest of impact Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute where he specializes in organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Follow Jason jasonawolf and The Beryl Institute berylinstitute on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/04/18/title_96 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - The importance of anticipating the patient experience
    shaped by the stories we hear the experiences we have had in the past and the way in which organizations and their people have engaged with us to date If we believe that to be true then we must ensure our healthcare organizations are also focusing on anticipating experiences as well So how do we anticipate experience I believe it starts with the fundamental of acknowledging that experience is all a patient or family member encounters in engaging with an organization It reaches well beyond the clinical encounter grounded in quality safety and service moments to what I have offered before as the three Ps driving excellence in experience efforts PEOPLE and the interactions they provide PROCESSES and the efficiencies they exemplify and PLACE and the environments they create If we start there then experience is something we have to address on more than one dimension The first is on organizational readiness as framed by the concepts I just mentioned and the second is on organizational responsiveness Readiness is all we do to ensure we have the people processes and systems in place to ensure the best in experience for every person every time I have written about this at length but reinforce here that anticipating experience is about ensuring we have all the operational considerations in place to be effective at what we do at all times We then must expand our conversation of anticipating experience to combat the very challenges I mention above If we solely focus on readiness we run the risk of creating another operational silo that loses its very value in reinforcing that experience is all we do in healthcare For that reason we need to ensure a clear commitment to responsiveness This in its simplest form is recognizing that for all the standardizing or processes we can put in place every patient and family encounter is unlike any that came before It should also not be equated to reacting because in its very nature responsiveness is grounded in a forward thinking and proactive engagement with others For that reason we need mechanisms for engaging with those in our care whether in planned or unplanned situations We must create opportunities to acknowledge the individual s we are ultimately caring for understanding their needs and expectations communicating what is and is not realistic and honoring the individuality they bring This may be the most important yet most challenging aspect of achieving the pinnacle of experience excellence we aspire to As I anticipate the experience of my family in the coming days I have great faith in the organization and the systems they will have in place to support us I have a belief and in fact the expectation that they are ready to do what is right It will be in their responsiveness in their ability to anticipate the experience we hope to have and they look to provide that will make the biggest difference Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/06/25/the_importance_of_anticipating_the_patie (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - The consumer has spoken: Patient experience matters
    driven by policy and mandate influenced by a reimbursement system that the typical healthcare consumer is not even aware exists And while these changes did cause shifts in behaviors organizationally they garnered minimal public attention Yet the improvements made in CAHPS scores in recent years are observable the surveys have moved us in their own limited way to a stronger focus on interaction This is only managed through the people and organizations engaged in our healthcare systems themselves I continue to hear healthcare leader provider and caregiver alike reinforce that the culture of an organization matters in patient experience excellence Perhaps we are experiencing a cultural renaissance in healthcare itself Our most recent global research at The Beryl Institute on the state of patient experience reinforced the notion that culture was a major factor in experience success It is why it was placed and remains at the heart of the definition of patient experience itself But why does any of this matter and what should cause us to look and listen as healthcare leaders The reality now is that consumers are more aware than ever of their role in the healthcare conversation Along with incredible patient advocates and leaders that continue to raise important issues for healthcare end users a great example being the critical effort to reinforce the importance of patient and family access to their own health information the market in general is listening and acting In just the five years since launching The Beryl Institute we have seen a meteoric increase in identified research focused on patient experience from tens to hundreds of efforts annually There has been an unquestionable emergence of new resources vendors products and services and even efforts to grow major patient experience focused corporate entities And perhaps most significantly there has been a rapid rise of patient experience being addressed in the public media Just last month when the reported CAHPS data evolved beyond listed percentages and data tables to user friendly star ratings the press was stirred There was and continues to be coverage in national regional and local press about how many stars healthcare organizations have received And while some may and do debate the merit of this reporting methodology it has become a tangible means by which the healthcare consumer is now informed Patient experience at least in the sense of this new presentation of the data has become newsworthy and without question a more public resource than ever before We closed our 2015 State of Patient Experience study with a simple pair of questions for healthcare consumers globally To the first 87 percent of respondents identified patient experience as extremely important to them To the second 67 percent said patient experience would be extremely significant with 28 percent saying somewhat significant in making healthcare decisions When we link this data reality from the voice of patients and families to the expanding coverage of experience information in the news we can only draw one conclusion patient experience matters It always

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/05/28/p5506 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - The 3 Ps of patient experience
    We must ensure we have the right individuals in place in every role reinforce the need for visionary leadership at all levels and focus on building a vibrant positive and strong culture committed to certain expected behaviors grounded in powerful stories and focused on clear outcomes People as a concept is more than just the individuals we are it represents all we stand for in providing the best in experience Process While people are our mechanism for most of what we do it is our processes that enable our ability to do so effectively In today s dynamic healthcare environment we must create and sustain agile organizations that have clear practical and effective processes for workflow engagement and action This is beyond clinical process checklists to understanding all that influence the experiences of those encountering our organizations How do we engage people when they first enter our organizations either virtually or physically How do we manage handoffs How do we convey and communicate information And how do we do all this in a timely and efficient manner Effective processes can achieve both dollar and time savings but more so they provide a better experience Place Where we conduct our work in healthcare has significant impact and provides some of the biggest challenges Place is still seen primarily as the physical environment but it also encompasses a growing virtual space in which we engage patients and families via apps portals or telehealth mechanisms The power of place is substantial and one we often take for granted This encompasses the simple factors such as noise good and bad and cleanliness It reaches to the experiential and aesthetic elements and design factors that expand and reinforce the experience we strive to provide We must acknowledge that design and environment have significant impact on mood comfort healing and engagement and ultimately experience overall Yet the reality is that creating the perfect physical space without first focusing on the fundamentals of people and process has little value Sitting at the core of these three Ps I actually offer one more for your consideration Purpose In all my travels and connections as we expand the patient experience conversation globally I see one consistent action in those organizations achieving success They are clear on who they are what they want achieve and where they are going This is the idea of definition I often speak to and look to reinforce In creating patient experience excellence you must have a foundation of purpose on which to determine the best people design the best processes and build the best place If you work to align these factors and recognize that this is work that is never truly done you will create a model and an opportunity for patient experience success It is an incredible and worthwhile journey Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute a global community of practice focused on patient experience improvement and founding editor of Patient Experience Journal Follow Jason jasonawolf The

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/08/21/the_3_ps_of_patient_experience (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Patient and family engagement: Healthcare's two-way street
    of people around the world are having a healthcare experience in clinical and non clinical settings and the spaces in between We have the opportunity to either actively make that experience inclusive of all voices or let it happen on its own Engagement in healthcare is not and should not be a passive concept Rather healthcare organizations must constantly create opportunities in which people feel invited and welcomed to engage and contribute They too must recognize engagement is ultimately an individual s choice I ll share a recent personal experience to highlight this perspective I was scheduled for a physical exam with my primary care physician I had to wait for almost four months for this wellness visit appointment Two days prior to my appointment I received a thoughtful automated voice mail reminding me of my appointment time and informing me of my responsibility to be on time and also noting there could be potential costs for a missed appointment On the day of my appointment I arose early to an ice storm as many did last month as I began my pre appointment fast With the bad weather I decided it best to contact the physician s office to confirm the appointment and I called just after the office s scheduled opening hours The phone rang endlessly without response and after 25 minutes of trying the phone was answered by the answering service for the practice In inquiring about my appointment I was told Sir all I can tell you is the office will be closed today In asking about my appointment the response was You will need to call back and talk to scheduling for a future appointment I am sorry we cannot help you with that I am not questioning the work of the answering service or even the decisions to close for the safety of all involved Rather I look at the experience provided by the office itself In acknowledging what we aspire to achieve via patient and family engagement I was an engaged patient But my experience was at best frustrating and even inconsiderate I have yet to receive a call about my appointment or any effort to reschedule That too has been left to me Engagement is not something we can or should just expect of patients and families Engagement from this perspective is a two way street We create the best opportunities for engagement by committing to provide the best in experience for all those we work with care for and serve This is why contributions such as the important work shared above are critical as we continue to expand the conversation I also hope we remember that accountability for engagement and ultimately experience is in each and every one of our hands That is the ultimate roadmap as we strive to create the best in healthcare outcomes for all involved Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute a global community of practice focused on patient experience improvement and

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/03/19/p5331 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Moving beyond centeredness in patient experience
    influence our decisions along the way As a result experience drives engagement and outcomes from clinical to financial The idea of centeredness was clearly framed in the Institute of Medicine s IOM 2001 report Crossing the Quality Chasm A New Health System for the 21st Century in which it defined patient centeredness as providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences needs and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions I believe we would all agree this is a fundamental part of the healthcare experience but would also acknowledge experience now demands much more In addition we are no longer looking at just clinical settings but an integrative and cross continuum approach to care driven by a rapidly evolving healthcare consumer The IOM report also offers six aims of improvement safe effective patient centered timely efficient and equitable I suggest these all represent components of an individual s healthcare experience and while distinguished from a provider perspective are all part of one mosaic seen by those seeking care This is reinforced by the great work of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement IHI a collaboration partner which acknowledges these IOM dimensions as well as quality and satisfaction outcomes are a means to gauge one element of the IHI Triple Aim the patient experience of care Here too I encourage us to look beyond the term experience of care to the healthcare experience overall which encompasses both the clinical care encounters as well as the moments in between This suggests that experience is inclusive of quality safety and service cost accessibility equity community population health outcomes and more Another significant and valuable contributor in this dialogue is the Institute for Patient and Family Centered Care IPFCC which presents patient and family centered care as an approach This reinforces the role of centeredness as a key component in achieving greater outcomes for those we care for and serve in healthcare systems around the world It must and should remain a fundamental strategy Maintaining a focus on centeredness and on satisfaction which in a recent blog I distinguish from experience is a critical strategy to ensure the best in experience So too are the process improvements to drive down errors or reduce falls efforts to ensure understanding of medications or support adherence to healthy diets commitments to ease of access equity of care and process efficiencies to offer just a few examples In addition providing opportunities for engagement and activation the knowledge skills and confidence to engage in and take ownership in our personal healthcare process and outcomes also supports providing a stronger more positive experience My hope in offering these thoughts is to begin a broader conversation on all the concepts that help us drive the best in experience in healthcare I do not intend to diminish the contribution of any of the concepts I mention but rather nudge us to see if we can begin to align our efforts toward a bigger idea If we

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/01/29/moving_beyond_centeredness_in_patient_ex (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    patient experience itself that the drivers of experience excellence are grounded not just in process excellence but also in the very fibers that comprise our healthcare organizations and systems That is the culture and leadership at all levels that drive how decisions are made how interactions take place and how outcomes are achieved Read more Leave a comment In five years the patient experience movement has come a long way September 17th 2015 by Jason A Wolf Earlier this week our community The Beryl Institute turned 5 years old In the context of healthcare as an industry these five years are but a flash in time but in the landscape of patient experience improvement as a central conversation to healthcare it represents a significant segment in a new and expanding conversation In my first Hospital Impact blog now almost four years ago I was exploring what we learned in our first State of Patient Experience benchmarking research and examining the state of what I believed was an emerging field in healthcare itself I offered What I have found in my encounters with healthcare leaders is that while patient experience may be seen by some as a fad based on recent policy i e a must do for now until the environment shifts it is gaining greater traction as leaders now have the air cover needed to address patient experience as the right thing to do in a way they may not have been able to before Read more Leave a comment Why I fired my doctor and he doesn t even know August 27th 2015 by Jason A Wolf I have thought for some time about this story and have shared it with others on various occasions It has stirred interesting conversation but more often mutual head nodding and the emergence of similar experiences It is a personal patient experience story that helps illustrate the broad reaches of the experience conversation in healthcare and I hope one that stirs thoughts from all perspectives on what we need to do to ensure continued awareness of and focus on this issue I had a scheduled appointment for months for my annual physical last fall Unfortunately the day prior to my appointment there was an emergency and I had to cancel so I called my physician s practice to reschedule After a lengthy effort and numerous apologies the scheduler finally offered a new date for a physical six months away in the early winter of this year While that was surprising I liked and trusted my physician and was willing to wait that time In the weeks prior to my February appointment I began to get the automated calls from the practice reminding me of my appointment how important it was I make the appointment and providing instructions on contacting the practice in advance of any need to cancel to avoid potential fees or other issues These calls even while automated were thoughtful reminders of not just timing but requirements for my appointment

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=Jason%20A.%20Wolfe&page=1&disp=posts&paged=1 (2016-02-10)
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