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  • Hospital Impact - Controversial surgeon scorecards may be necessary first step in transparency effort
    complication rate because it was based on flawed readmission claims data But other experts saw it differently and voiced support for the scorecard as a necessary first step in providing patients with data to help them make informed decisions about whom to select as their surgeon Dr Charles Mick former president of the North American Spine Society said he felt that the scorecard was long overdue and wonderful to have the information out in the public Dr Robert Wachter of the University of California at San Francisco said if he were a patient he would give the scorecard considerable weight in choosing a surgeon and a hospital Paul Levy former CEO of Boston s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center wrote that the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program has developed a rigorous method of evaluating surgical outcomes but the results are not shared with the public Levy seems to be saying that we should share the best method but the ProPublica scorecard is better than nothing This week the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery announced it will use the ProPublica scorecard rating in its every 10 year recertification process Executive Director Dr Shephard Hurwitz said that the scorecard results would be one of many quality metrics used to recertify surgeons If a surgeon has a high complication rate the board may delay his or her certification or ask the affected physician to explain why the rate is acceptable It is controversial but the fact that we re doing it in the spirit of transparency and holding people accountable for what s already in the public domain Hurwitz said The Affordable Care Act payment reform and the general public are all demanding more accountability and more transparency from everyone involved in healthcare delivery First attempts at such efforts will always have shortcomings and unintended consequences but the process has to start somewhere The back and forth controversial opinions will be beneficial if it inspires everyone involved to continue to improve these scorecards I don t think they are going to go away UPDATE The controversy over the ProPublica Surgeon Scorecard continues Perhaps reflecting the ambivalence of many surgeons about being subjected to ratings the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery has announced that it has not yet decided to use the scorecard according to ProPublica The statements by its leadership initially saying it would be using the scorecard evidently had not been discussed with the board and it is trying to figure out what it wants to do Kent Bottles M D is a lecturer at the Thomas Jefferson University School of Population Health and chief medical officer of PYA Analytics Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/10/15/title_141 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Actions speak louder than words: How mHealth is moving beyond patient engagement and improving patient care
    chief digital officer of IMS Health said We don t know how well these devices measure what they measure and realistically we don t know where they are from a medical precision standpoint However for people with chronic health conditions mobile technology can provide crucial support and lower costs A recent Australian study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association JAMA found that people who received multiple text messages per week to remind them to make healthy lifestyle changes had more success reducing their weight blood pressure cholesterol and tobacco use than people who didn t By the same token low income diabetic patients who received text messages from their healthcare providers were better able to fine tune their daily insulin dosage according to a study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research Normally diabetic patients who require insulin injections have to make a series of doctor visits to fine tune their daily dosage Because taking time off from work to see a doctor can be difficult for people who work hourly jobs they often live with elevated blood sugars for weeks or months until they can find time to get to a clinic Another social media tool that is changing how healthcare providers treat patients is telemedicine or telehealth Telemedicine allows medical information to be exchanged via two way video email smartphones wireless tools and other telecom technology Not only does telehealth allow caregivers to provide remote care a recent JAMA study found no difference in quality between in person and telemedicine visits for minor conditions There are number of ways telemedicine is helping to change the way care is provided Doctors can remotely provide care to rural locations A Texas children s hospital is working with school nurses to remotely provide lab consultations strep and flu tests to 57 schools in North Texas according to HIT Consultant Doctors can evaluate and treat stroke patients remotely There s even a House of Representatives bill that proposes a change in the Social Security Act to allow people experiencing a stroke to use telemedicine regardless of their location Currently telemedicine services can only be used if patients live in rural areas In addition there a number of new technologies that allow doctors to provide care even though they may be miles away For example a new digital stethoscope records the sounds of a patient s heart stores them in a HIPAA compliant database and transmits them to an iPhone app the Chicago Tribune reports As a result cardiologists can sit in their offices and review heartbeats sent from around the world So while mHealth may not fully have realized its promise it s definitely moving in the right direction Jenn Riggle is the senior director of public relations for Compass Professional Health Services Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/10/01/actions_speak_louder_than_words_how_mhea (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Silence can kill: Doctors, nurses and staff must hold each other accountable
    to a limited number of individuals he informed me that the unfortunate complication my mother in law experienced was the result of poor medical decision making and that the staff at the facility did nothing wrong as they merely followed the physician s orders and kept her guardian informed appropriately I felt I was in a time warp circa 1965 harkening back to the day when the expert had sole responsibility when accountability for an adverse outcome merely reflected the failure of a physician to measure up to society s high professional standards Nurses management and staff were merely subordinates who played a dutiful and passive role in fulfilling the physician s needs and expectations As we now know through the work of James Reason Swiss Cheese Model and others the truth is more complex Errors and adverse outcomes occur because of the penetration of multiple organizational layers unchecked by any effective barrier or resistance Active errors by a single individual at the frontline sharp end are seldom sufficient to cause an adverse outcome are supported by a wealth of enabling passive systemic errors throughout the organization dull end that permit the active errors to result in potential harm For instance in my mother in law s case why didn t The agency that employed the physician utilize evidence based pathways or algorithms that would have made it impossible for him to prescribe antibiotics inappropriately without an organizational audit in real time so that the medical director could intervene The Alzheimer s unit provide training and support to staff to go up their chain of command if anyone felt uncomfortable or uneasy with a resident s condition or care at any time day or night The senior living facility share the concerns of the staff with the family guardian so that he could make more informed decisions The head nurse at the senior living facility make daily rounds through the Alzheimer s unit to personally observe the health status of the residents speak to staff and review the records The head nurse at the senior living facility perform audits of antibiotics prescribed for all institutionalized residents to insure appropriate antibiotic stewardship It s true that the physician should be held accountable for his decision to take clinical shortcuts which unfortunately are common in institutional settings However the solution is more complex and it takes a chain of errors for real harm to occur In 2010 the American Association of Critical Care Nurses AACCN Association of Peri Operative Registered Nurses AORN and VitalSmarts interviewed over 7 000 physicians and nurses and found that 84 percent of physicians witnessed co workers taking dangerous short cuts 88 percent of physicians witnessed co workers making poor clinical judgments 88 percent of nurses were unwilling to confront a co worker providing sub standard care 99 percent of physicians were unwilling to confront a co worker providing sub standard care Thus we perpetuate a culture of silent or passive enablement where an individual makes medical errors

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/09/04/silence_can_kill_doctors_nurses_and_staf (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    did find a couple of empty seats and again made note of the number of people gathered in mass for the same procedure Part of me said Great clearly this is the place to be They perform high volumes of this procedure and thus must have perfected the process This thought did not last long Read more Leave a comment Medical home s role in children s health still evolving January 15th 2013 by Thomas Dahlborg In a previous blog post I stressed that we must refocus the principles of patient centered medical homes PCMH to ensure compassionate care is elevated in the hierarchy of priorities if we are to truly position children to achieve their optimal health Since then two additional barriers to children s health have become all too familiar bullying and adolescent substance abuse and the link between the two For example in the online December issue of Pediatrics researchers from the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University found that 64 percent of those surveyed report getting bullied at school with the risk of bullying increasing relative to the child s body weight Read more Leave a comment Humanity The heart of patient experience success December 19th 2012 by Jason A Wolf As I look back at all that was written and shared during this past year on patient experience not only in my previous blog posts but in the words shared by so many patient experience leaders caregivers hospital administrators physicians patients and family members I was moved to find compelling powerful and even emotional themes As readers you were drawn to the stories shared about the experiences people had and it brought home an important point As much as we in healthcare strive to provide the best patient and family experience enact effective strategies and tactics and implement the required policies we must remember we are patients and family members ourselves In the talks I share and in visits to healthcare organizations I witness what I believe rests at the core of the healthcare experience we are human beings taking care of human beings Read more Leave a comment Love A measurable actionable solution to healthcare December 12th 2012 by Thomas Dahlborg Recently my family and I visited with my 94 year old grandmother Mémère She had been discharged from the hospital after a fall and was home recuperating During our visit we shared stories told jokes listened observed learned laughed and engaged We truly connected And interestingly not only did Mémère feel better during this time together but we all did too As we were leaving I kept thinking about how well we all felt and also wondered what magic was in play and how it could be applied to the healthcare system If we all felt this good all had such great experiences and no adverse outcomes we must be able to translate this to healthcare And eventually it came to me The secret to these wonderful outcomes was

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=true%20north&page=1&disp=posts&paged=2 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - How providers can use mHealth to reach millennials (and Gen Xers)
    than half 60 percent would be interested in having video chats with their physician rather than participating an in office visit In addition 71 percent would be interested in having their PCP give them a mobile app to help them manage preventive care review health records and schedule appointments More Healthcare providers should embrace mHealth as a way to reach this important yet hard to reach generation The good news is that physicians are already embracing mobile technology for their own personal use One survey shows that more than 80 percent of U S doctors use mobile apps or view professional content on mobile devices This number will only increase and hopefully as more algorithms become available and privacy issues are addressed hospitals will embrace connected health systems such as interoperable medical records remote health monitoring and patient communication portals It s also important to note that while there is a lot of interest in mobile apps and wearable devices tried and true text messaging continues to be one of the best and easiest methods to engage patients according to a recent study Sometimes these messages are automated and other times they re direct messages from clinicians The advantage of using text messaging is that it can be received by any mobile phone This is especially important since many seniors still use flip phones Another reason healthcare providers need to embrace mHealth is because millennials and Gen Xers already feel comfortable using digital and mobile technology to find healthcare information Nearly 50 percent of millennials and Gen Xers use online reviews when selecting a healthcare provider And because they ve grown up with social media 63 percent of millennials feel comfortable sharing their health data from wearable devices with their physician according to the State of the Connected Patient report More importantly it s clear this trend isn t going to change Generation Z or iGeneration those born after 1994 are just as tech savvy as millennials and have literally grown up with a smartphone in their hand My 16 year old uses her iPhone in her classes to shoot videos of physics lab experiments and record translations in her French class They consume media on their smartphone instead of a computer so mobile is the best way to reach them This is an exciting time as we move forward and begin to analyze mHealth data as a way to improve patient care In the meantime mHealth provides a way to help physicians build relationships with busy millennials and Gen Xers and encourage them to lead healthier lives Jenn Riggle is the senior director of public relations for Compass Professional Health Services Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/05/14/how_providers_can_use_mhealth_to_reach_m (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - 7 digital resolutions for hospitals
    people need to be able to find it You may have a beautiful informative website but are you making the most out of Search Engine Optimization SEO This is important but can be a time intensive task Or have you spent a lot of time creating compelling videos and posting them on YouTube but wonder why they may not attract viewers A simple way to fix this is by not just posting key words but by posting the entire video transcript Reach the right people Research shows that hospitals tend to post generic content or information about employee related issues and achievements While this approach helps build critical mass by engaging hospital employees which is especially important when launching social media programs it won t help turn people into patients It s important to know your audience and know what topics interest them which will help increase followers and stimulate engagement Give the people what they want Not only is this the name of a great album by the Kinks it s a good social media mantra for hospitals Your site s Google Analytics will help you identify whether people are coming to your site to learn about your heart and vascular program or maternity services or simply want directions to your hospital This information will help you identify topics for future blogs and social media posts and will help ensure that you continue to provide content that interests people Focus on what works Hospital marketing departments are stretched thin and it s often difficult for staff to find enough hours in the day to do their work and manage all of their organization s social media properties Rather than having a mediocre presence in multiple social media channels focus your efforts on a couple of major channels Or create an educational social media campaign that encourages people to take control of their own health such as getting a mammogram or having a colon cancer screening Listen to what people say One of the most important parts of social media engagement is listening to what people say The challenge is to keep up with the channels as they evolve For example Yelp is where people go to get restaurant reviews but patients also use it to review the care they receive at their local hospital It s important to hear what people say and respond to their concerns It s amazing how listening to people and addressing their concerns can help turn a detractor into an advocate Be part of the bigger conversation In addition to listening to patient comments hospitals should listen to the issues and concerns that other organizations in their community including other hospitals talk about Listening to others allows you to be more relevant and become part of the bigger conversation Jenn Riggle is a PR and communications consultant who lives in Dallas Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/01/07/7_digital_resolutions_for_hospitals (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Big data: The Godzilla of healthcare
    purchases and anticipate patients future healthcare needs For example if a patient buys a lot of alcohol or eats a lot of fast food he or she could be at a risk for depression or diabetes Reduce healthcare costs The July issue of Health Affairs identified six ways that big data can help reduce healthcare costs including improving treatment for high cost patients reducing readmissions improving patient triage treating patients with deteriorating health conditions decreasing adverse events and treating people with diseases that affect multiple systems Organ transplant matching Hospitals can also use big data to find matching organ donors Economic professors developed an algorithm to find organs for previously incompatible pairs that takes into account blood type antibody information of the candidate and the antigen information of the donor A Carnegie Mellon professor created an advanced algorithm to create a kidney exchange network featuring donor chains The result people can get the organs they need to lead healthy lives Scary Monster However even with these promising outcomes big data is still a giant destructive monster The problem facing big data is that no one has answered two very important questions What is the right way to collect this information Who should be allowed access to this data Federal Trade Commissioner Julie Brill expressed concerns about the way smartphone apps and mobile devices are collecting health information and sharing it with third parties In addition a recent FTC study reported that health app developers have collected consumer health data and shared it with third parties including marketers The fact that mobile companies share people s health data with third parties without notifying people raises some major legal and ethical concerns There aren t any accepted standards for how patients agree to have their information used and shared One terrifying scenario would be if this data is collected and shared with the wrong people Imagine if the number of steps people walk a day the number of hours they sleep per night their blood pressure scores and whether they buy alcohol on a regular basis is shared with insurance companies Independently these facts might not mean anything but together they might indicate that people are at higher risk for diabetes or heart disease and insurance companies could raise their insurance rates There are also concerns about whether the data used in predictive analysis is clean While the data from the patientâ s medical record may be accurate the data from external sources may not be Combining data from different sources could impact the accuracy of the conclusions and ultimately lead to prescribing the wrong treatment Time will tell whether big data will save the day or destroy the world But either way the healthcare landscape will change dramatically Let s just hope we won t have giant monsters battling in U S cities smashing buildings squashing cars and making a giant mess of things Healthcare reform is one thing but giant monsters that breathe radioactive steam is something completely different Jenn

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/08/07/big_data_the_godzilla_of_healthcare (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    year old pregnant woman who was declared brain dead on life support against her wishes and those of her family Read more Leave a comment What hospitals can learn from the Thanksgiving Day Parade November 20th 2013 by Jenn Riggle Thanksgiving is a time known for pilgrims football and eating way too much turkey It also marks the beginning of the holiday season with the Macy s Thanksgiving Day Parade While hospitals may not be in the business of selling sweaters and scarves they can learn some marketing lessons from the grand dame of department stores Celebrate your community The Thanksgiving Day parade is not only a celebration of the holiday season it also celebrates New York City Hospitals need to celebrate the communities they serve It s been said healthcare is local However being a local hospital is more than calling yourself a regional medical center It s important to provide services that are relevant to the community you serve For example if you re a hospital located in North Carolina in the heart of tobacco country and the Stroke Belt you should provide different community outreach programs than a hospital located in Colorado one of the healthiest states in the country Read more Leave a comment Must follow healthcare marketing folks on Twitter September 17th 2013 by Nancy Cawley Jean I ve been on Twitter for almost five years now It has become my go to source for everything research breaking news trends healthcare marketing information and meeting wonderful people Over the years I ve used the list function in Twitter to easily organize the people I follow so I can quickly browse through categories like news outlets journalists or healthcare marketing folks This post highlights some of those on my list because if you are in healthcare social media you should be following them too Now believe me when I say this list is not all inclusive I know there are many folks who deserve to be included but there s just not enough space in a blog post to single out all the amazing minds sharing healthcare marketing information Read more Leave a comment Hospitals add video to healthcare marketing toolkits September 3rd 2013 by Jenn Riggle A picture may be worth a thousand words but to paraphrase a popular credit card commercial a video is priceless Videos have helped hospitals become better storytellers and create an emotional response with viewers which ultimately help drive engagement Hospitals have used videos to humanize their brands educate consumers provide virtual tours of their facilities and provide real time documentation of surgeries Each month YouTube the videosharing website has 1 billion unique visitors who watch more than 6 billion hours of video It s no surprise YouTube has become the most popular social media platform among healthcare marketers And while YouTube may dominate the video space two new video tools Vine and Video for Instagram are gaining in popularity Since hospital marketing teams have limited resources it s important

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=jenn%20riggle&page=1&disp=posts&paged=2 (2016-02-10)
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