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  • Hospital Impact - Good health is a societal issue, not a medical one
    ratio to that and providers know that a physician on site can address problems early In my white paper Dementia Friendly as a Strategic Business Imperative for Hospitals Health Care Providers I suggest that Future success of providers hinges on an understanding that societal health is more than just about population health and that ACO players are not just other hospitals physicians and long term care entities Rather employers banks supermarkets in short the community all play a role when it comes to understanding dementia including Alzheimer s Caring for family caregivers in the workplace and creating dementia friendly communities are key issues that society has to address together It takes a forward looking visionary leader to embrace interventions that you are not directly getting paid for but which you know intuitively will benefit the health of the population Take Anna Roth CEO of Contra Costa Regional Medical Center and Health Centers a large publicly funded health system in the San Francisco Bay Area Roth s organization has partnered with Health Leads to direct patients to resources that affect health including food and housing Anna says It is time we look beyond the four walls of our institutions and see how we can partner with those who have already mastered things like housing and employment There are expert agencies We should learn how to work with them If these networks and organizations are not as strong as we would like them to be maybe the role we can play is to be strong partners for them so they can strengthen themselves Exactly Since the senior population is my focus and probably the majority of your patients I further suggest that providers look at new roles in the organizations that can better address the intent of what CMS is trying to accomplish and will inherently inspire more real partnership not referral programs such as what Contra Costa has done Many healthcare providers have care coordinators who work in service line specific environments Often providers lament that they need a coordinator for the coordinators In the United Kingdom certain hospitals in the NIH have implemented a role dementia coordinator to service this specific patient population across diagnoses It is critically important in light of the following Nearly half of all individuals on antipsychotics in nursing facilities were admitted with a prescription for these medications already in place The majority of nursing home admissions come directly from the hospital Make the connection Nearly 45 percent of hospitalizations among nursing home residents enrolled in Medicare or Medicaid are avoidable People with dementia are far more likely to be hospitalized than their peers without impaired brain function About two thirds of the hospitalizations that occur in people with dementia are for potentially preventable illnesses The role is designed to support patients admitted with a known diagnosis of dementia or cognitive impairment The coordinator is a dementia champion assisting in reducing the stigma attached to dementia patients The coordinator is also responsible for helping family caregivers

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2016/01/28/p5726 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    we find at the core of healthcare interactions overall It is this same vulnerability that lies at the core of the experience for a patient family or caregiver network It is grounded in the fear of the unknown the anticipation of the challenges to be faced the hopes and dreams of what outcomes will result Read more Leave a comment A healthcare CEO s take on what it means to be a superboss January 21st 2016 by Barry Ronan First off I do not consider myself a superboss that is for others to decide But I do find this concept to be most interesting For those of you who may not be familiar with the term it comes from a recently published book by Sydney Finkelstein The focus of his book and related article in the January February 2016 issue of Harvard Business Review is how these superbosses hire talent and hone it going forward So just who are they They are innovators who have the ability to groom talent and develop future leaders they are confident competitive intelligent and imaginative and most importantly they act with integrity Wow superhuman or simply superboss Actually I have been blessed to have worked for a number of such superbosses they have been mentors and leaders who have possessed the traits and characteristics identified above I was mentored extensively in the early years of my career first starting as an equipment orderly in central processing through moving to the position of executive vice president of the health system some 20 years later I am certainly a better person and leader as a result of that superboss mentoring Read more Leave a comment The 10 traits of a great healthcare organization January 21st 2016 by Jonathan H Burroughs Recently I had the opportunity to query successful healthcare organizations large and small academic and non academic and ask them What are the key factors that enable your organization to perform at such a high level Nearly every organization gave the same answers and thus there appear to be universal attributes that lead some organizations to great outcomes and leave others behind They are I Commitment to culture As a quip attributed to management guru Peter Drucker states culture eats strategy for breakfast It certainly transcends it as every organization iterated that culture had to be addressed before anything was possible Hill Country Memorial Hospital in Fredericksburg Texas went through a period almost a decade ago that its leadership affectionately call the purge whereby individuals who could not or would not live up to the organization s values were asked to leave and the organization went from a low performer to a 2014 Baldrige Award Winner It is now considered one of the best small healthcare organizations in the nation Read more Leave a comment The problem with financial incentives in healthcare January 14th 2016 by Thomas Dahlborg Back in the early 1990s while working for Harvard Community Health Plan later Harvard Pilgrim Health Care I

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/?blog=1&page=1&disp=posts&paged=2 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    we find at the core of healthcare interactions overall It is this same vulnerability that lies at the core of the experience for a patient family or caregiver network It is grounded in the fear of the unknown the anticipation of the challenges to be faced the hopes and dreams of what outcomes will result Read more Leave a comment A healthcare CEO s take on what it means to be a superboss January 21st 2016 by Barry Ronan First off I do not consider myself a superboss that is for others to decide But I do find this concept to be most interesting For those of you who may not be familiar with the term it comes from a recently published book by Sydney Finkelstein The focus of his book and related article in the January February 2016 issue of Harvard Business Review is how these superbosses hire talent and hone it going forward So just who are they They are innovators who have the ability to groom talent and develop future leaders they are confident competitive intelligent and imaginative and most importantly they act with integrity Wow superhuman or simply superboss Actually I have been blessed to have worked for a number of such superbosses they have been mentors and leaders who have possessed the traits and characteristics identified above I was mentored extensively in the early years of my career first starting as an equipment orderly in central processing through moving to the position of executive vice president of the health system some 20 years later I am certainly a better person and leader as a result of that superboss mentoring Read more Leave a comment The 10 traits of a great healthcare organization January 21st 2016 by Jonathan H Burroughs Recently I had the opportunity to query successful healthcare organizations large and small academic and non academic and ask them What are the key factors that enable your organization to perform at such a high level Nearly every organization gave the same answers and thus there appear to be universal attributes that lead some organizations to great outcomes and leave others behind They are I Commitment to culture As a quip attributed to management guru Peter Drucker states culture eats strategy for breakfast It certainly transcends it as every organization iterated that culture had to be addressed before anything was possible Hill Country Memorial Hospital in Fredericksburg Texas went through a period almost a decade ago that its leadership affectionately call the purge whereby individuals who could not or would not live up to the organization s values were asked to leave and the organization went from a low performer to a 2014 Baldrige Award Winner It is now considered one of the best small healthcare organizations in the nation Read more Leave a comment The problem with financial incentives in healthcare January 14th 2016 by Thomas Dahlborg Back in the early 1990s while working for Harvard Community Health Plan later Harvard Pilgrim Health Care I

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&page=1&disp=posts&paged=2 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - 'Imagine' the possibilities when healthcare, community leaders pursue a common goal
    people and many key public private and governmental organizations who supported this effort We even have a memorandum of understanding with the City of Cape Coral Parks and Recreation Department to develop shared healthy lifestyle programs together Just last week I had a chance to listen to John Lennon s song Imagine The Pathway to Discovery serves as an example of the benefit of dreaming about a community or world coming together as one i e a new street name is coming on campus called One Community Way no need for hunger i e food from the garden being served in our cafeterias and wellness center cafe John Lennon s Imagine excerpts You may say I m a dreamer But I m not the only one I hope someday you ll join us And the world will be as one Imagine no possessions I wonder if you can No need for greed or hunger A brotherhood of man Imagine all the people Sharing all the world You may say I m a dreamer But I m not the only one I hope someday you ll join us And the world will live as one Thanks to Joany Christin John Rod Dave Tommy Dirk Wendy Johnny Boy Master Gardener and Kirsten and so many community leaders for your Pathway dreaming And no possessions This Pathway now belongs to our community and is dedicated to our employees physicians and volunteers Share some things you dreamed about and helped to make a reality Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/11/19/title_145 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Hospital-community partnerships: Be the spark
    shared our vision and blueprint for our Pathway to Discovery it became easier to engage more leaders One of the first to support our efforts was the American Heart Association which donated planters and their teaching garden curriculum From there the school system was interested in collaborating Of course that meant lots of kids wanted to participate That led to more community businesses and residents donating funds towards the area exercise equipment and benches to create a healing space for all to thrive This space could be used for outside physical occupational and speech therapy It is a campus now open to our public as we moved toward a privately owned public park model on a hospital campus Before you know it we had city and governmental leaders showing interest and joined in our first planting day These efforts showed how you could take a simple yet innovative idea and watch it prosper before your eyes These hospital and community collaborations provide some grassroots approaches to learn from each other and move toward achieving healthier community members better care better health and lower costs What s your idea to spark community interest Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/02/11/hospitals_and_communities_becoming_partn (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - 'Imagine' the possibilities when healthcare, community leaders pursue a common goal
    people and many key public private and governmental organizations who supported this effort We even have a memorandum of understanding with the City of Cape Coral Parks and Recreation Department to develop shared healthy lifestyle programs together Just last week I had a chance to listen to John Lennon s song Imagine The Pathway to Discovery serves as an example of the benefit of dreaming about a community or world coming together as one i e a new street name is coming on campus called One Community Way no need for hunger i e food from the garden being served in our cafeterias and wellness center cafe John Lennon s Imagine excerpts You may say I m a dreamer But I m not the only one I hope someday you ll join us And the world will be as one Imagine no possessions I wonder if you can No need for greed or hunger A brotherhood of man Imagine all the people Sharing all the world You may say I m a dreamer But I m not the only one I hope someday you ll join us And the world will live as one Thanks to Joany Christin John Rod Dave Tommy Dirk Wendy Johnny Boy Master Gardener and Kirsten and so many community leaders for your Pathway dreaming And no possessions This Pathway now belongs to our community and is dedicated to our employees physicians and volunteers Share some things you dreamed about and helped to make a reality Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/11/19/p5694 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - It takes a village to tackle hospital ER overcrowding
    community for example emergency medical services Serve as a platform to centralize and share ideas Then replicate and spread best practices Focus on one overall outcome with project specific goals which ultimately improve flow In our case we rallied around ER patient holds once patients were in admission status Generate ideas and focus on the most meaningful and impactful ones during this coming season and implement down the line with longer term benefits Focus on implementing ideas by leveraging the system of care including pre hospital care ER inpatient discharge process and post acute Measurements are identified for each project in support of the overall bed capacity and flow goals The ultimate goal is to keep people healthier at home or in the right place for care While our larger steering group came up with almost 100 ideas we narrowed down do the ones we thought could be implemented and impactful this season The following were focus areas Preventive We added schedulers in our ERs to help set follow up outpatient appointments if needed This takes place after the patients are treated in our ER It provides more peace of mind for patients knowing they had follow up care scheduled versus solely relying on an ER for care Responsive We started progression of care rounds a multidisciplinary approach to progressing our patients toward discharge and the most appropriate post acute setting We opened up additional inpatient beds to help with patient flow and demand This included a significant recruitment effort as well Corrective We developed a coordinated site specific and system wide approach to bed capacity management proactively managing patients as surges arise While we have made great strides it does not mean the season will be an easy one Yet we are more prepared to handle the season ahead This could only happen with a comprehensive system of care approach toward coordinating care in our community We know it takes a strong team focused on safety continuous process improvement the care of our patients each other and ourselves What does your organization do to prepare and coordinate large volume surges Let s learn from each other and replicate nationwide Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds failed to act

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/10/08/er_patient_flow_and_bed_capacity_a_safet (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - It takes a village to tackle hospital ER overcrowding
    community for example emergency medical services Serve as a platform to centralize and share ideas Then replicate and spread best practices Focus on one overall outcome with project specific goals which ultimately improve flow In our case we rallied around ER patient holds once patients were in admission status Generate ideas and focus on the most meaningful and impactful ones during this coming season and implement down the line with longer term benefits Focus on implementing ideas by leveraging the system of care including pre hospital care ER inpatient discharge process and post acute Measurements are identified for each project in support of the overall bed capacity and flow goals The ultimate goal is to keep people healthier at home or in the right place for care While our larger steering group came up with almost 100 ideas we narrowed down do the ones we thought could be implemented and impactful this season The following were focus areas Preventive We added schedulers in our ERs to help set follow up outpatient appointments if needed This takes place after the patients are treated in our ER It provides more peace of mind for patients knowing they had follow up care scheduled versus solely relying on an ER for care Responsive We started progression of care rounds a multidisciplinary approach to progressing our patients toward discharge and the most appropriate post acute setting We opened up additional inpatient beds to help with patient flow and demand This included a significant recruitment effort as well Corrective We developed a coordinated site specific and system wide approach to bed capacity management proactively managing patients as surges arise While we have made great strides it does not mean the season will be an easy one Yet we are more prepared to handle the season ahead This could only happen with a comprehensive system of care approach toward coordinating care in our community We know it takes a strong team focused on safety continuous process improvement the care of our patients each other and ourselves What does your organization do to prepare and coordinate large volume surges Let s learn from each other and replicate nationwide Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds failed to act

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/10/08/p5676 (2016-02-10)
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