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  • Hospital Impact - Meet the hierarchy of patient needs to improve experience
    patients have a hierarchy of needs too In Colleen Sweeney s keynote presentation at The Beryl Institute s 2012 Patient Experience Conference she outlined a few of the most basic and fundamental patient needs A bed Rest Cleanliness Reassurance Response to call lights Family needs among others In their recent Harvard Business Review article Deirdre E Mylod and Thomas H Lee emphasize the importance of eliminating the avoidable suffering that comes from dysfunction in healthcare delivery In other words such dysfunction occurs when evidence based clinical care is inconsistent and unreliable resulting in avoidable suffering such as Fear or anxiety as a consequence of lack of coordination and teamwork lack of respect shown to patient and loss of trust in providers Unnecessary waits for appointments test results and explanations and even for their caregivers to communicate with one another about their care Apparent lack of concern about safety With gaps in the first second and third rung hierarchy of patient needs for Debbie her father and her family avoidable suffering occurred Debbie s eloquent explanation of what was most important to her and her father highlighted for me once again the power of the patient and family voice Her passionate advocacy for her father reinforced the need to expand patient experience beyond its often narrow reference to service excellence and patient satisfaction to include other key priorities patient safety care quality value and efficiency Mylod and Lee maintain a comprehensive approach to measuring and reducing suffering is not just an ethical imperative As hospitals strive to hardwire the basics it makes strategic sense to identify measure and reducing avoidable suffering for patients and their families How Consider the following strategic pillars Advocate for the importance and central place of patients and families as key partners in patient experience improvement Implement formal and informal methods of listening to and learning from the patient and family voice which can include patient and family advisory councils patient and family feedback forums and similar Map the patient and family experience to identify and maximize the most valuable elements of the experience from the patient and family perspective Patient experience isn t only about attempting to wow and delight patients and their families It s about eliminating avoidable suffering by providing reliable evidence based clinical care the foundation for every patient s most basic hierarchy of needs Doug Della Pietra is the director of Customer Services and Volunteers for Rochester General Hospital in New York where he directs an intentionally designed patient and family centered volunteer program oversees the front line valet and guest services teams and leads the service excellence element of the Patient Experience Initiative while co chairing the hospital s Patient Experience Team Follow Doug DougDellaPietra on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/12/03/meet_the_hierarchy_of_patient_needs_to_i (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Improve patient experience by reflecting on your own
    a short pause as her eyes quickly scanned the folder contents She continued It shouldn t be more than five or 10 minutes and handed me the buzzer Patient 507 Excuse me I m sure my face revealed my shock and then disgust Now the receptionist had the best of intentions and was attempting to protect my mom s privacy and confidentiality Still it hurt Patient 507 was offensive to me because it depersonalized and dehumanized my mom I share this story because my mom s health challenges and connections with healthcare organizations during the past two and a half years have been my primary learning center as a patient experience leader I have observed more outside in sights as the son of a mother whom I greatly love who has multiple myeloma than from the 5 000 plus pages of patient experience blogs research studies and articles I ve read By reflecting on that brief moment of truth a touch point with that organization seared into my memory I learned a key lesson Follow the lead of the patient or family member Since I referenced my mom in the conversation with the receptionist she could have protected privacy and confidentiality in a patient centered way by doing what I did saying It shouldn t be more than a five or 10 minute wait for your mom While I am not grateful she struggles with the effects of multiple myeloma her experience has been my teacher and guide I ve learned new ways to avoid inside out organization centered language rationale justifications and instead see through the eyes with the outside in perspective of the patients and family members I encounter every day As Patient Centered Care Awareness Month comes to conclusion I am grateful healthcare organizations are seeking expert advice from patients As Tom Dahlborg emphasized in his recent Hospital Impact blog post Prevent a triple fail with true patient centered care and Jason Wolf reminded with his post Think small for big patient experience results patient centered care and the small things make a difference in the healthcare experience So as you consider your organization s patient experience initiatives and projects how can your own outside in experience as a patient or family member provide insights Doug Della Pietra is the director of Customer Services and Volunteers for Rochester General Hospital in New York where he directs an intentionally designed patient and family centered volunteer program oversees the front line valet and guest services teams and leads the service excellence element of the Patient Experience Initiative while co chairing the hospital s Patient Experience Team Follow Doug DougDellaPietra on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/10/29/improve_patient_experience_by_reflecting (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Get to know your patients to improve care
    others For example one of the unit s patients was admitted with chest pain Without going into all of the details one of the patient s nurses for only a few hours was Michele a nurse of 25 years experienced dedicated by the book direct and here for all of the right reasons as Clare put it The patient was overweight drank alcohol regularly worked extreme hours in a high stress job and had other risk factors for cardiac disease In addition the patient was stoic and not likely to express the fear of the upcoming procedure In the course of the morning the patient and spouse poked fun with Michele who jumped right in and used the opportunities to educate her patient on different diet choices that would fit the patient s life style Michele also talked about the procedure and what to expect Following the angiogram and later that evening right before Michele was about to leave she got a phone call It was the patient I just wanted to call and let you know that everything went great with my procedure today and wanted to say thank you for the care and service that you gave me You re more than just a nurse you re a real person who gets to know her patients Thank you Clare connected the dots Taking just a little time to talk to your patients getting to know a little something about them often means more to a patient than anything else Michele was able to make that connection with her patient in the course of a morning It s not the quantity of time spent with your patients but the quality The patient clearly was touched by her efforts As the weeks passed more and more of Clare s team started sharing In fact one day when Clare forgot to ask someone spoke up and said Hey I learned something about one of my patients today Clare suggests three simple steps to get your team to know their patients better Ask the question of everyone on your team nurses techs secretaries housekeepers etc Allow awkward silence it s insightful especially if no one can tell you something new they ve learned about their patients Connect the dots and make meaning for the team Why is it important that you learned that about your patient Doug Della Pietra is the director of Customer Services and Volunteers for Rochester General Hospital in New York where he directs an intentionally designed patient and family centered volunteer program oversees the front line valet and guest services teams and leads the service excellence element of the Patient Experience Initiative while co chairing the hospital s Patient Experience Team Follow Doug DougDellaPietra on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/09/30/get_know_patients_improve_experience (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Sow the seeds of empathy to improve patient experience
    with the takers that remain and a third group he calls matchers those who protect themselves by seeking reciprocity and despite their desire to become givers have not crossed over because they feel too vulnerable To answer the question myself it seems empathy may be the link it s the distinguishing characteristic abundant in givers and yet diminished or suppressed in takers and matchers Takers lack empathy because they focus primarily or even exclusively on their own needs before those of others and matchers have a diminished capacity for empathy because they feel too vulnerable Sam Ford in his recent Harvard Business Review article believes the present day problem with customer empathy is the result of professional training that has distanced us from fundamental principles of human communication He adds We now tend to focus on empirical data from survey results and analytics or customer insights from feedback forms and focus groups constrained by what the company knows to ask The decline in empathy and the inability to see through the eyes of others has culminated in treating customers patients as a number or a profile or a concept instead of an actual human being What do organizations do with the takers and matchers who remain after promoting givers Leading edge research and years decades even of evidence show the seeds of empathy can be cultivated Organizations can develop the empathic capacity of takers and matchers Specifically as Ford s thinking suggests help improve communication increase the frequency and quality of the human connections between caregivers and patients and foster the ability of caregivers to see through the eyes of others Programs like Massachusetts General s Empathy and Relational Science Program University of Rochester Medical Center s Mindful Practice Curriculum and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center s Patient and Family Centered Care Methodology and Practice are only a few of the excellent resources available to help improve caregiver empathy presence and the ability to see through the eyes of others We need to rediscover our humanity because we are human beings taking care of human beings see Jason Wolf s December 2012 Hospital Impact blog post Promoting givers to patient experience leadership positions is only step one The other more difficult but essential step is improving every caregiver s capacity for empathy Doug Della Pietra is the director of Customer Services and Volunteers for Rochester General Hospital in New York where he directs an intentionally designed patient and family centered volunteer program oversees the front line valet and guest services teams and leads the service excellence element of the Patient Experience Initiative while co chairing the hospital s Patient Experience Team Follow Doug DougDellaPietra on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/09/03/sow_the_seeds_of_empathy_to_improve_pati (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Prioritize operational standards for patient experience success
    is important because you don t want to get into a situation where you are pushing people to improve the patient experience and they push back saying So you want me to pay more attention to making patients happy than my quality of care He also emphasizes that patient experience is not about making patients happy over quality It s about safe care first high quality care and then satisfaction and experience We want people to understand how it s prioritized 1 Examples of Prioritized Operational Frameworks I disagree with the conclusion that the Forbes article title suggests namely that rating your doctor is bad for your health Rating physicians hospitals medical practices surgical centers etc is not the fundamental issue competing and incorrectly prioritized operational standards are bad for the health of our patients To guide caregivers at the Cleveland Clinic and Disney s cast members each organization developed prioritized operational frameworks Operating Standards for Patient Guest Experience Cleveland Clinic Disney Priority 1 Safety Priority 1 Safety Priority 2 Quality Priority 2 Courtesy Priority 3 Experience Satisfaction Priority 3 Show Priority 4 Value Efficiency Priority 4 Efficiency Interestingly even Disney s operational framework 1 would have provided the ED doctor in the earlier example with a prioritized set of standards congruous with both good medicine and the explicit Hippocratic Oath or implicit promise of every healthcare worker to do no harm and improve people s health Establishing a prioritized operational framework for patient experience is not only crucial for the overall experience of our patients but equally important for the peace of mind and confidence of all caregivers who face dozens and even hundreds of decisions every day See Tom Dahlborg s post Healing the healer in healthcare If you know of other healthcare organizations that have a prioritized operational framework for patient experience please share and comment below Thank you 1 Hirsch Lonnie At Cleveland Clinic Patient Experience is Not Just About Patient Satisfaction Healthcare Success Strategies May 3 2013 Last accessed on June 10 2013 2 For a good explanation of what each of Disney s operating standards involves see Kinni Theodore B Be Our Guest Perfecting the Art of Customer Service New York Disney Editions 2011 Print 48 51 Doug Della Pietra is the director of Customer Services and Volunteers for Rochester General Hospital in New York where he directs an intentionally designed patient and family centered volunteer program oversees the front line valet and guest services teams and leads the service excellence element of the Patient Experience Initiative while co chairing the hospital s Patient Experience Team Follow Doug DougDellaPietra on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/07/31/title_111 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    touch e g handshake hug or pat on the back Communicating friendliness warmth and respect See Best relationship practices for patient centered care Sitting down to speak with the patient Engaging in active listening asking open ended and or pointed questions Establishing rapport Empathizing Read more Leave a comment Enhance patient experience with volunteers April 3rd 2014 by Doug Della Pietra Patient experience is among the top three hospital priorities today Caregiver engagement is one of the most essential strategies for improving the patient experience Within caregivers volunteers represent a large population we should not forget but rather leverage to deliver better experiences Next week April 6 12 the United States celebrates National Volunteer Week s 40th anniversary Since the 1980s most evidence based studies on healthcare volunteers focused on the financial and productivity implications to healthcare organizations Specifically two recent studies link healthcare volunteerism to organizational performance patient satisfaction and the overall experience of patients and their families In honor of the generous contribution and dedication that volunteers bring to healthcare I d like to shine a light on the human touch that volunteers offer patients and families Read more Leave a comment Embed patient experience advisors hospital wide January 29th 2014 by Doug Della Pietra There s a genuine sense that we re all in this together We are being heard and acknowledged We are valued around the table Whether staff or patients or family members we all want improved outcomes and that s only possible when caregivers and patients and their families are in partnership and work together Those are just two testimonials from patient experience advisors on Kingston General Hospital s Patient and Family Advisory Council PFAC that four of us three patient family advisors and I heard when we traveled to Kingston Ontario a couple of weeks ago For starters KGH s mission is compelling and clear Outstanding Care Always The hospital s strategy is explicit in its commitment to transform the patient s experience through a relentless focus on quality safety and service Moreover KGH has developed a simple and memorable definition for patient and family centered care Respect Me Hear Me Work With Me Read more Leave a comment Think just like me to improve patient experience January 6th 2014 by Doug Della Pietra Since we are human beings taking care of human beings perceiving others as just like me affects caregiver empathy and shapes patient perceptions and overall experience When I attended the Search Inside Yourself workshop led by Google s Chade Meng Tan in September I learned many science based attention training and mindfulness tools for increasing emotional intelligence and sustaining peak performance One of those was a combination of the just like me mindfulness practice and a variation of the loving kindness meditation LKM practice which aims to explicitly cultivate positive feelings generating an emotional state that is full of unconditional love compassion and empathy toward the self and others Salzberg 1995 1 Growing evidence 2 demonstrates the positive effects

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=Doug%20Della%20Pietra&page=1&disp=posts&paged=1 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    you doing or What do you do here How do you wish they would answer See my desired response in a couple paragraphs Read more Leave a comment How to deliver a world class patient experience April 29th 2013 by Doug Della Pietra In a very recent article Dr Delos M Cosgrove president and CEO of the Cleveland Clinic wrote Not all hospitals and medical centers can afford the most modern facilities or advanced technology However we can all afford to listen to our patients hear their stories and empathize with their hopes and fears Be a World Class Service Provider Like Cosgrove Dr Bryan Williams emphasized the critical importance of relationship and interaction during his keynote address Delivering World Class Service What Healthcare Can Learn from Hospitality at The Beryl Institute s Patient Experience Conference earlier this month Williams suggested that for a hospital to be a world class service provider it must engage the patient and consistently exceed patient expectations Engagement occurs at the emotional level and consistency happens every and not part time Read more Leave a comment Make emotional connections for better patient experiences April 1st 2013 by Doug Della Pietra Why do we remember some things and not others Even when we share an experience with other people the details and aspects we remember often differ from those of the others Why Emotions determine memory says customer experience expert Joyce Hostyn Gary Small M D professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine supports Hostyn s claim Any time we experience something in a heightened emotional state we re more likely to remember it Therefore the intensity of emotion I may experience can significantly differ from the intensity of emotion others experience even when faced with the exact same situation and circumstances Read more Leave a comment Build patient loyalty with personalized service recovery March 4th 2013 by Doug Della Pietra Recently I made a large purchase from a well known wholesale photo video company Long story short the experience was extremely disappointing and frustrating I even had to go to the UPS Store while on vacation after discovering the newly purchased camera was defective While highly trained phone agents apologized at several moments of truth along the customer journey company policies and department silos prevailed in the end For my inconvenience the company emailed me a coupon for a free tote bag backpack or disposable camera Unfortunately not only were the gift offerings unrelated to my specific experience as a customer but the coupon could only be redeemed in their store some seven hours away Hospitals often make similar service recovery efforts When free parking or meal tickets are offered for patient or family experiences not related to parking or food issues the service recovery may be perceived as generic and impersonal and only make matters worse Read more Leave a comment Previous Page Next Page Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=Doug%20Della%20Pietra&page=1&disp=posts&paged=3 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - The case for collaborative financial leadership in healthcare
    More specifically PDSA means Plan the change to be tested or implemented Do carry out the test or change Study data before and after the change and reflect on what was learned Act plan the next change cycle or full implementation Albert Einstein reportedly said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results If we tie this to quality improvement insanity would be skipping the study aspect of improvement and thus not reflecting learning or improving Why do I share these stories and these two points When faced with the need to reduce healthcare costs healthcare finance leaders often continue to mandate arbitrary unit cost reductions to decrease medical expense and improve the bottom line And yet arbitrary unit cost reductions although they could positively impact financial results in the short term do not lead to improved care outcomes and in fact may actually increase long term healthcare costs through patient harm and overtreatment The examples above are missing a crucial piece Finance leaders and their healthcare delivery counterparts working collaboratively to develop creative approaches to care provision rather than simply dictating unit cost reductions In not doing so they are we all are missing great opportunities to leverage quality improvement and patient centeredness and to develop models and programs that lead to improved outcomes and overall improved medical costs savings for the entire health system The concept of group visits or care when done well unlike the broken model highlighted above is one successful example of these opportunities coming together Using physical rehabilitation as an example group visits developed with the focus on improved engagement safety and health outcomes would ensure patients are all rehabbing a specific similar injury e g ACL tear for a specific purpose e g to return to skiing and participating in their care together This creates a bond and a healing community where the patients learn from one another support one another and improve together For another example of group care see Centering Pregnancy In this example the cost to the system is less and yet the model and community of health it creates leads to better engagement activation and experience of patients and clinicians improved safety appropriate levels of treatment and improved health The quadruple aim and beyond As healthcare finance leaders be it within a hospital managed care organization or other we are part of a system and a community We have the same mission and vision within each of our healthcare institutions as the CEO the doctors the nurses and the entire community in which we serve And if short term financial returns that place our patients families and communities in harm s way is part of our mission it is a shameful one and must be changed immediately If it is not we need to apply quality improvement to our work and join the efforts to improve optimal care provision with new innovative and creative financially responsible care models aligned

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/02/04/the_case_for_collaborative_financial_lea (2016-02-10)
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