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  • Hospital Impact - Humanity: The heart of patient experience success
    are clear choices to make and these choices are probably far less difficult then we make them out to be I say this not to diminish the critical strategic nature patient experience plays in overall healthcare outcomes and even the financial viability of healthcare organizations or to downplay the core tactics that help ensure our patients feel attended to and cared for These are still central to how patient experience makes a contribution to healthcare overall But perhaps as I return to what I discovered in my review of the year we also must recognize the fundamental needs the patient experience itself reveals In reading great pieces on Hospital Impact from my colleagues such as Thomas Dahlborg Doug Della Pietra Anthony Cirillo and Jenn Riggle as just a few examples what moved us and our conversation as a community of leaders was not only suggestions of practice It was the compelling stories of experience through the eyes of a friend a loved one and even our own that sparked our greatest energy and engagement What I saw in many of those stories moved beyond a discussion of action steps or policy to true moments of interaction and the perceptions they revealed This is where the power of positive patient experience makes itself known I often mention The Beryl Institute s definition of patient experience as a guiding framework for how we can acknowledge and address patient experience the sum of all interactions shaped by an organizationâ s culture that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care What we find beneath the surface of these words is that personal interactions organization culture and perceptions themselves occur not only in tactical ways but also at an emotional level If we try to over systematize the experience process we may lose this most important element The themes I found in looking at this year reveal words that speak to that very humanness at our core in healthcare empathy and compassion caring and communication commitment and hope and yes even love In remembering that these words matter could very well be where we can make the greatest difference in providing the best in patient experience for all As we experience the holiday season and look to the New Year with fresh eyes and joyful hearts perhaps it is these same feelings that should frame the foundation of all we can do in service to patients their families and to one another in healthcare In recognizing our humanity what touches us scares us and inspires us we will without question make the right choices and ensure that our work in the year gone by and our hopes for the year ahead will only lead to the best for our patients Happy Holidays and may the New Year lead us to even greater experiences for all Jason A Wolf Ph D is executive director of The Beryl Institute where he specializes in organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Follow Jason jasonawolf and

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/12/19/p4186 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Love: A measurable, actionable solution to healthcare
    Engage Listen According to the Journal of the American Medical Association On average physicians listen to patients concerns for about 23 seconds before interrupting them We must develop a model where the physician and patient have the time connection and trust and a safe place for the patient to tell their whole story and for the provider to truly listen and use the learnings from hearing the whole story to co create with the patient a care plan that better positions the patient for optimal outcomes Observe Providers must be positioned to be mindful to be present and to observe i e to observe the patient the family and oneself and to observe the interactions between all With the additional wisdom garnered through mindfully observing providers will be better positioned to connect authentically on a human level with their patient They will be better positioned to leverage these additional garnered data points with purpose and discernment to arrive at optimal treatment decisions while ensuring the safety of their patients see High Reliability Organizations Visit From Gallup keys to improving the patient visit and thus patient relations and satisfaction include Give patients an opportunity to talk and listen to what they have to say Treat patients as people not as medical conditions Anticipate patient questions and provide answers before they ask Explain what you are going to do what you are doing and why you did it Again the healthcare visit must be redesigned to ensure ample time for optimal connection and communication between patient and provider Much like a visit with a beloved grandparent Engage Steve Wilkins M P H in his blog post There is No App for Patient Engagement said it brilliantly P roviders need to be engaging to patients in their demeanor attitudes and how they talk with and listen to patients Doctors need to know who the patient is what their fears concerns and expectations are and what the patient is able and willing to do Meaningful patient engagement the kind that leads to long term health behavior change begins with patient centered interpersonal relationships between patients and their doctors Once more I have learned another important lesson from my Mémère even while she is rehabbing after a fall Thank you Mémère LOVE is the key to improving the healthcare system LOVE should be found at each and every encounter and each and every visit Now that would be real innovation Thomas H Dahlborg M S M is Vice President for Strategy and Project Director for the National Initiative for Children s Healthcare Quality NICHQ where he focuses on improving child health and well being Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/12/12/title_80 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    my patient when I truly don t have a clue Read more Leave a comment 5 front line staff opportunities with bottom line impact September 19th 2012 Editor s Note This is the third in a three part series on leadership and operations that examines the power of front line staff by Thomas Dahlborg Recently I have shared stories of how leadership not listening to front line staff affects patients staff and hospitals From those examples I have highlighted some areas where input from the frontlines can be leveraged to improve the financial outcomes of your hospital as well as the U S healthcare system Patient satisfaction and experience Patient experience is increasingly being tied to financial incentives according to a study in the journal Quality Management in Healthcare Moreover the financial implications associated with the measured perceptions of how well physicians and nurses attend to and provide information to patients and their families are substantial Good patient experience correlates with lower medical malpractice risk In fact for each drop in patient experience score along a five step scale of very good to very poor the likelihood of being named in a malpractice suit increased by 21 7 percent noted a brief form the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation s Aligning Forces for Quality What are other opportunities to engage front line staff and improve the financial health of your institution Read the full article at FierceHealthcare Leave a comment Listen to front line care solutions for inadequate staffing September 12th 2012 Editor s Note This is the second in a three part series on leadership and operations that examines the power of front line staff by Thomas Dahlborg Mother Teresa once said Do not wait for leaders do it alone person to person Front line employees are following this advice trying to make things better for patients families and one another Consider front line efforts to combat emergency room overutilization shared in a previous Hospital Impact blog post Hospital leadership called for investments in brick and mortar such as building a larger emergency room constructing hospital owned urgent care centers closer to where frequent ER users live or establishing primary care practices inside the ER However front line staff had its own solution and knew how to better address the issue To learn how listening to front line staff can help solve problems like inadequate staffing read the full article at FierceHealthcare Leave a comment Why healthcare leaders can t ignore front line employees September 5th 2012 Editor s Note This is the first in a three part series on leadership and operations that examines the power of front line staff by Thomas Dahlborg In a recent blog post I implored healthcare leadership who make decisions that affect staff and patients to listen to those working on the front lines of healthcare Despite the dangers of not supporting front line staff many healthcare leaders continue to make decisions without their input For example one community hospital in Portland Maine left

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=true%20north&page=1&disp=posts&paged=3 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Hospitals can't afford to ignore mHealth
    of patient confusion over medications inadequate follow up with primary care physicians or a family s inability to deal with home care mHealth and remote patient monitoring can help change this by identifying health issues when they are most treatable to avoid an expensive hospital stay Successful pilot programs Hospitals and technology companies conduct pilot programs to remotely monitor patients after they re discharged For example Zephyr Technology recently completed a two year congestive heart failure trial in partnership with Qualcomm Life Verizon Wireless National Institutes of Health Indian Health Services and Flagstaff Hospital in Arizona which lead to an increase in time between hospital visits and lower costs Readmissions research A recent Mayo Clinic study reported that using a smartphone app during cardiac rehabilitation can reduce hospital readmissions The researchers studied 44 patients and found only 20 percent who attended cardiac rehab and used the app were readmitted to the hospital or visited the emergency department within 90 days compared with 60 percent of those who did not use the mobile app Electronic health record integration The fact that popular electronic health records now integrate data from remote monitoring devices demonstrates that they re gaining mainstream acceptance For example Practice Fusion known for its cloud based electronic health record recently announced strategic partnerships with two companies that will incorporate data from remote monitoring systems into their EHR making it easier for physicians to review trended glucose and insulin levels as well as ECG strips during routine office visits Population health mHealth technology also supports population health initiatives by providing people with information to help them manage chronic health conditions such as such as diabetes heart disease and COPD For example diabetic teens that received weekly customized text messages related to their medication plan were more likely to adhere to treatment Recently New York s Montefiore Medical Center gave diabetic teens a monitoring device to wear before a major surgery Information about the teen s condition is sent to caregivers who can send a text message to the teen in case they need to make an adjustment to their diet or other action to prepare for their procedure While hospitals have many technology priorities they need to rethink the role mHealth plays in their care management plans and their budgets Let s hope CIOs can find room in their budgets for mHealth They can t afford not to Jenn Riggle is a vice president at Weber Shandwick Worldwide based in Washington District of Columbia and member of its healthcare practice Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/05/14/hospitals_cana_t_afford_not_to_have_a_mh (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Texas case a reminder that living wills protect patients, providers
    Texas do not allow life support to be withdrawn from a pregnant woman even if she has a living will It seems only natural that hospitals want to give an infant every possible chance to survive no matter how slim And while there have been cases like the one in Michigan where a brain dead mother pregnant with twins stayed on life support and eventually delivered two healthy infants at 25 weeks those cases are few and far between Unfortunately the Munoz family s story didn t have a happy ending In the end a judge had to determine whether it was appropriate to have the young mother and her child taken off life support The case is highlighted a disconnect between federal and state laws Advance directives are governed by state law Yet the Federal Patient Self Determination Act passed in 1990 requires hospitals and nursing homes certified by Medicare and or Medicaid to Tell patients of their right under state law to file an advance directive and refuse treatment Ask if they already have an advance directive Make note of it in their medical record However the federal law lacks the teeth to defend patient rights In 2010 President Barack Obama issued a memo that instructed the U S Department of Health and Human Services to ensure full compliance with the existing law and issued new guidelines to ensure enforcement Yet confusion remains Why The federal law doesn t apply to individual physicians and private clinics and practices In addition each state develops its own written description of the law This leads to discrepancy in the interpretation of the federal law which explains why states have different rules about advance directives and pregnant women Such ambiguity not only puts the family at risk but also the hospital For example a Michigan jury awarded more than 16 million to the family of 34 year old Brenda Young because the hospital ignored her living will While it is unusual for courts to award substantial damages to families for not following living wills and other advance directives the precedent has been set The Munoz family s story is a tragic one but it has helped bring to light the fact that we are all more vulnerable that we may have thought Advance directives are important but they need to be followed to protect not only the families but also the people who care for them Jenn Riggle is a vice president at Weber Shandwick Worldwide and member of its healthcare practice Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/02/12/texas_living_wills_advance_medical_direc (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - What hospitals can learn from the Thanksgiving Day Parade
    AMI acute myocardial infarction and TIA Transient Ischemic Attack These are scary terms that are difficult to understand and require people to confront their own mortality It s no wonder people only want to go to the hospital when they re sick However you can use a sense of humor to educate people in a way that captures their attention and helps drive engagement In healthcare we ve seen states use comedy as a way to educate people about the new health insurance marketplaces Rather than use terms like Obamacare or healthcare reform state health insurance exchanges created lighthearted ads featuring Paul Bunyan Babe the Blue Ox and a strolling guitarist who sings the catchy song Long Live Oregonians Hospitals need to take a similar approach to educate people to take a more active role in managing their health Use community involvement so balloons and events stay grounded Like the employees and community members who hold the strings of the giant balloons in the parade community events and organizations help to ground hospital s larger health initiatives For example Monadnock Community Hospital developed the Bond Wellness Center a medically based fitness and rehabilitation facility to encourage residents to be more active and lead healthier lives Located in my hometown of Peterborough N H the wellness center provides cardiac rehab services as well as exercise and training activities for older residents who want to stay in shape It s not unusual to meet an 85 year old working out on the treadmill or elliptical machine Create children s events to reach children of all ages Hospitals have a history of spending a lot of time creating programs and service line offerings to meet the needs of older patients However in a society where 40 is the new 30 people don t want to look their age or let a bad knee restrict them from playing tennis and they may not identify themselves as being in your demographic However if you target children people can embrace their inner child And anyway everybody loves a parade Remember the past The Thanksgiving Day Parade a tradition for 85 years celebrates New York and the beginning of the holiday season So too hospitals have rich histories of caring for the communities they serve Bon Secours DePaul Medical Center in Norfolk Va was established more than 150 years ago in response to the yellow fever epidemic of 1855 St Elizabeth s Medical Center in Massachusetts was founded by five Catholic women in 1868 to care for sick immigrant women and provide shelter to retired and feeble women Hospitals can point to decades of meeting the needs of their community It s important to remind people of the past while you re telling them about today s quality scores and your latest high tech Hospitals can use outreach activities to build closer relationships with the communities they serve They don t need to include marching bands and giant balloons but they can make all of the difference

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/11/20/what_hospitals_can_learn_from_the_thanks (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Must-follow healthcare marketing folks on Twitter
    conferences I m hoping to hear him one of these days but until then I ll have to follow him on Twitter and I hope you will too And don t forget to check out his blog hivedan Dan Hinmon is the head of Hive Strategies and works in hospital social media He shares a wealth of information and is such an enjoyable person to chat with He s also got a blog that should be on your reading list the Social Media Strategy Blog Be sure to check out his seven core values at the heart of social media danamlewis Dana Lewis is one of those people who I consider simply amazing She manages the social media efforts of Swedish Health Services and is the founder of Healthcare Communications and Social Media hcsm a weekly Twitter chat I can t tell you how many times I ve asked her a question on Twitter and always receive a quick helpful response riggrl When I met Jen Riggle on Twitter she was working for a firm on the East Coast She s got a wonderful take on the industry and also is a fellow Hospital Impact blogger so you may be familiar with her work She is kind thoughtful smart and witty and shares fantastic healthcare marketing information you won t want to miss ReedSmith Reed is a smart thoughtful guys who always is on my go to list with questions about the industry He founded the Social Health Institute and also works as a consultant for healthcare organizations and practices that are using social media Be sure to follow his blog for new insights into healthcare and social media Ahaval I ve followed Ahava Leibtag for quite a while and recently had the honor of being interviewed for her blog She is one of those people who never seem to stop She s smart funny and so hard working that her passion for this industry comes through loud and clear She s a thought leader on digital strategy and a talented writer who always shares valuable information You can check out some of her publications and her blog chrisboyer Chris directs digital marketing for Inova Health System and is simply amazing His blog says Chris Boyer is an active participant in the rapidly evolving field of healthcare new media marketing He s a speaker and educator and someone who puts talk into action by creating and testing new digital strategies He is in a word brilliant in my humble opinion and I ve learned so much from him Be sure to follow him on Twitter and subscribe to his blog dandunlop Dan Dunlop is the president of Jennings a healthcare marketing agency Dan is one of those folks who you feel as if you ve known for a long time even if you ve never met him in real life I chat with him often on Twitter and also love to read his blog The Healthcare Marketer where you ll

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/09/17/must_follow_healthcare_marketing_twitter (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    during two specific interactions within our hospital accounts that showed the real power of social media to help people Read more Leave a comment Digital job shift could impact hospitals social media June 26th 2014 by Nancy Cawley Jean I recently read a blog post by Arik Hanson arikhanson about well known people in the digital world switching jobs In his post Hanson said Research has proven that ambitious upwardly mobile employees get a little bored after a few years in the same role They master the job quickly get bored and want a new challenge This is exactly what is happening in social right now Social media became a real job in the past five to six years We launched social media for the hospitals in the Lifespan health system in 2009 and we were among the first 5 percent of hospitals to do so According to the Health Care Social Media List maintained by the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media as of this writing 1 563 hospitals now use social networks The American Hospital Association reports there are 5 723 registered hospitals in the United States so 27 percent of hospitals have jumped into social media That s up 22 percent in five years Read more Leave a comment What hospitals should know about changing social media April 17th 2014 by Nancy Cawley Jean Things always change in the world of social media and sometimes it s hard to keep up Recently two things cropped up that deserve more attention than others Heartbleed The big news last week was the security breach dubbed the Heartbleed encryption bug because well it s just so bad It leaves users of many sites not only social media vulnerable to security breaches Hospitals using social media should check which sites updated and change passwords accordingly but don t do it unless the site was actually updated with a patch So how do you know if you should update your password or not This Mashable story has info on major sites Also this website will check domains for you to see if it s safe to change your password I recently received an email from Pinterest that we should change the passwords on our accounts which was nice But don t expect that from every site I d recommend doing your homework and responding appropriately when you know a site has been updated Read more Leave a comment Communicating with patients Stick with the tried and true March 12th 2014 by Nancy Cawley Jean Over the years the way we communicate with patients has changed drastically I remember the days when working for a health plan we would coordinate postal mailings Then email came along and then text messaging And of course there s always been traditional media outlets television newspaper and radio We ve all seen the statistics about how many people are on social media Seventy three percent of adults online use a social network and 42 percent use multiple

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?s=nancy+jean&sentence=AND (2016-02-10)
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