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  • Hospital Impact - Reframing healthcare drama: Life is good!
    My trip to Japan was canceled right before their tsunami glad my life was spared I lost my brother to a fluke accident the tragedy has pulled our family together My mom had a stroke last week she still has her speech There was a silver lining in everyone s story Sure they all wished the event did not take place however they shared the positive side given the reality of the situation Healthcare is changing at a rapid pace What a great time to make it work together we can t do this alone One of my colleagues said I marvel at the opportunities we have life is good Let s hear your stories on perseverance and what you positive impact you have created in your organization Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds failed to act on earlier outbreak 8 developing healthcare trends Hottest Products Compare Top Solutions in Hospital Management Electronic Medical Billing Software Healthcare Revenue Cycle Management Practice Management Software Clinical Information Systems CIS Clinical Data

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/07/30/reframing_healthcare_drama_life_is_good (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Reframing healthcare drama: Life is good!
    My trip to Japan was canceled right before their tsunami glad my life was spared I lost my brother to a fluke accident the tragedy has pulled our family together My mom had a stroke last week she still has her speech There was a silver lining in everyone s story Sure they all wished the event did not take place however they shared the positive side given the reality of the situation Healthcare is changing at a rapid pace What a great time to make it work together we can t do this alone One of my colleagues said I marvel at the opportunities we have life is good Let s hear your stories on perseverance and what you positive impact you have created in your organization Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds failed to act on earlier outbreak 8 developing healthcare trends Hottest Products Compare Top Solutions in Hospital Management Electronic Medical Billing Software Healthcare Revenue Cycle Management Practice Management Software Clinical Information Systems CIS Clinical Data

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/07/30/p5641 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Healthcare execs: Lead, follow and help whenever necessary
    leadership of many different individuals Throughout the countryside and in the many small communities the ability to impart the sense of vision and implement this move toward independence required a concerted effort with leadership at all levels While that trait was integral to our nation s foundation it is directly translatable to all of us throughout the workplace particularly in our medical center More What makes a good leader and who should assume that role The answers are that everyone has some capability for leading and should want to play a part Do what s right even when there s pressure to cut the corners Be willing to accept responsibility share the workload help others and set the example for others by how you conduct yourself in your job It isn t something that is only limited to those in positions of decision making Every one of us makes decisions each day on how best to do our assigned tasks More importantly we must decide that we are willing to share in our concerted effort toward providing the best in healthcare The development of leaders and those necessary skills takes place every day Physicians and senior executives whether they want to accept this mantle or not must recognize the need to exhibit leadership traits in their practice and encourage a culture that promotes leadership at all levels But it extends far beyond those positions Whether you are a nurse on the floor working in the lab transporting patients cleaning the rooms balancing the budget fixing computers making schedules teaching students it doesn t matter Those in positions of authority at whatever level who may at times not always set the good leadership example must be willing to project solid leadership values As a retired military officer I recall that I was taught to lead follow or get out of the way I think we could expand this a bit by advocating that all of us should be willing to lead whenever necessary follow when appropriate and help create an environment where there is the expectation of good leadership How do you promote an environment and expectation of great leadership Thank you Dr Clement Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/07/02/healthcare_execs_lead_follow_and_help_wh (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Healthcare execs: Lead, follow and help whenever necessary
    leadership of many different individuals Throughout the countryside and in the many small communities the ability to impart the sense of vision and implement this move toward independence required a concerted effort with leadership at all levels While that trait was integral to our nation s foundation it is directly translatable to all of us throughout the workplace particularly in our medical center More What makes a good leader and who should assume that role The answers are that everyone has some capability for leading and should want to play a part Do what s right even when there s pressure to cut the corners Be willing to accept responsibility share the workload help others and set the example for others by how you conduct yourself in your job It isn t something that is only limited to those in positions of decision making Every one of us makes decisions each day on how best to do our assigned tasks More importantly we must decide that we are willing to share in our concerted effort toward providing the best in healthcare The development of leaders and those necessary skills takes place every day Physicians and senior executives whether they want to accept this mantle or not must recognize the need to exhibit leadership traits in their practice and encourage a culture that promotes leadership at all levels But it extends far beyond those positions Whether you are a nurse on the floor working in the lab transporting patients cleaning the rooms balancing the budget fixing computers making schedules teaching students it doesn t matter Those in positions of authority at whatever level who may at times not always set the good leadership example must be willing to project solid leadership values As a retired military officer I recall that I was taught to lead follow or get out of the way I think we could expand this a bit by advocating that all of us should be willing to lead whenever necessary follow when appropriate and help create an environment where there is the expectation of good leadership How do you promote an environment and expectation of great leadership Thank you Dr Clement Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/07/02/p5556 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    ways to support our patients and families our colleagues and ourselves We are essentially moving care coordination down the field toward improved health Read more Leave a comment Why healthcare leaders should ask for feedback March 11th 2015 by Scott Kashman My kids help me stay humble and make me realize how simple life lessons could stay with you a lifetime One of the lessons includes feedback Very few people accept feedback fewer intentionally make changes once they receive the feedback that includes not getting defensive and very few actually solicit feedback Fortunately I have learned to solicit feedback on a daily basis You know what I find People provide feedback because they were thinking it anyway Once people see your openness to it trust build and sustainable changes happen So let me share some feedback with you as receiving feedback includes transparency Read more Leave a comment Hospital community partnerships Be the spark February 11th 2015 by Scott Kashman One day I was speaking with my colleague Joan Odorizzi our Healing Environment Business Partner She shared her vision of having a connecting pathway across our campus reflecting the connecting relationships inside our organization and across our community What started out as an aspirational concept moved toward a simple walking pathway As the concept developed we reached out to community leaders to share our plans to promote healthier lifestyles through the lens of an optimal healing environment OHE A similar concept can be found in a recent FierceHealthcare article which describes the American Hospital Association s blueprint for hospital community partnerships and touches on the Triple Aim better care better health and lower costs Read more Leave a comment Using social media for community engagement A success story January 15th 2015 by Scott Kashman and Nancy Travis Scott Over the past several years I have been more actively involved in social media Through my own blog Facebook LinkedIn Twitter and Hospital Impact I have tried to see what forums were most effective Each plays to a slightly different audience or provides a different way for me to engage others in communication When I started out Paul Levy and Marty Bonick were two executives who guided my first blog efforts It allowed me a chance to share some organizational perspectives and get more people in dialogue Recently we started a hospital Facebook page to better engage community members and staff in accordance with our social media policies It serves as a way to share upcoming events solicit feedback and gain real time perspectives when people check in to our facility In fact I spoke to one family member who shared some concerns with wait times given our busy seasonal fluctuations She and I connected and I shared some of our plan to alleviate this She then turned to me and shared how amazing and caring our emergency department team was during her stay It s allowed me to learn how we could use social media in a positive proactive way to

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=scott%20kashman&page=1&disp=posts&paged=2 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Not using the Medicare wellness visit is making people sick
    risks that if not caught early will result in costly hospitalizations and improper use of the healthcare system later Consider that the most common chronic conditions among Medicare beneficiaries are High blood pressure 58 percent High cholesterol 45 percent Heart disease 31 percent Arthritis 29 percent Diabetes 28 percent According to the Department of Health and Human Services two thirds of Medicare beneficiaries have at least two chronic conditions and they account for 93 percent of Medicare spending Think of the cost of not catching these earlier and making lifestyle interventions sooner In an accountable care organization and bundled payment environment the AWV can help the ACO achieve significant savings Working with the patient it is an ideal time to set health goals put a prevention plan together and provide better care coordination In essence the AWV is an essential part of person centered care Looking at the top healthcare utilizers of care Ian Morrison in a recent Hospitals Health Networks article suggested the best management of many of these top 5 percent utilizers may end up looking a lot more like social work than medical care Housing transportation income support nutritional support and counseling may be more beneficial and effective than any form of conventional medical intervention The AWV is an opportunity to assess the activities of daily living ADLs and instrumental activities of daily living IADLs perform a fall risk assessment review home safety review medications and refer patients to community resources as noted by Morrison There is little excuse not to offer this screening It can be done as part of a telehealth visit administered by a physician assistant nurse practitioner or other licensed professionals And you can even outsource it Better outcomes better experience cost savings why not get on board Lindsy Blaze writing for LaunchMed notes that The difficult part is in convincing physicians of the importance and developing strategies with the ACO physicians as to how to implement these visits within their current practices That can include providing templates or checklists for AWV requirements training for the billing team or designating supporting teams to provide this service under the supervision of the physician Frankly this is another case where we need leaders who can see the big picture and tell a convincing story to others Anthony Cirillo F A C H E is president of the Aging Experience which specializes in experience management and strategic marketing across the continuum of care Anthony is a monthly contributor on The Charlotte Today program the about com expert in senior care an executive board member of CCAL and a member of the Dementia Action Alliance Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/10/08/not_using_the_medicare_wellness_visit_is (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Not using the Medicare wellness visit is making people sick
    risks that if not caught early will result in costly hospitalizations and improper use of the healthcare system later Consider that the most common chronic conditions among Medicare beneficiaries are High blood pressure 58 percent High cholesterol 45 percent Heart disease 31 percent Arthritis 29 percent Diabetes 28 percent According to the Department of Health and Human Services two thirds of Medicare beneficiaries have at least two chronic conditions and they account for 93 percent of Medicare spending Think of the cost of not catching these earlier and making lifestyle interventions sooner In an accountable care organization and bundled payment environment the AWV can help the ACO achieve significant savings Working with the patient it is an ideal time to set health goals put a prevention plan together and provide better care coordination In essence the AWV is an essential part of person centered care Looking at the top healthcare utilizers of care Ian Morrison in a recent Hospitals Health Networks article suggested the best management of many of these top 5 percent utilizers may end up looking a lot more like social work than medical care Housing transportation income support nutritional support and counseling may be more beneficial and effective than any form of conventional medical intervention The AWV is an opportunity to assess the activities of daily living ADLs and instrumental activities of daily living IADLs perform a fall risk assessment review home safety review medications and refer patients to community resources as noted by Morrison There is little excuse not to offer this screening It can be done as part of a telehealth visit administered by a physician assistant nurse practitioner or other licensed professionals And you can even outsource it Better outcomes better experience cost savings why not get on board Lindsy Blaze writing for LaunchMed notes that The difficult part is in convincing physicians of the importance and developing strategies with the ACO physicians as to how to implement these visits within their current practices That can include providing templates or checklists for AWV requirements training for the billing team or designating supporting teams to provide this service under the supervision of the physician Frankly this is another case where we need leaders who can see the big picture and tell a convincing story to others Anthony Cirillo F A C H E is president of the Aging Experience which specializes in experience management and strategic marketing across the continuum of care Anthony is a monthly contributor on The Charlotte Today program the about com expert in senior care an executive board member of CCAL and a member of the Dementia Action Alliance Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/10/08/p5677 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Does population health management really account for dementia patients?
    to the level of today so all cancers were considered death sentences And while Alzheimer s currently has no cure it and other forms of dementia can be slowed and quality of life improved when there is earlier diagnosis and a care plan in place The patient centered medical home PCMH even when all six of its standards are in place is not prepared for the crisis The PCMH does not account for the facts that often primary care physicians are not equipped to diagnose and treat dementia that there are far too few geriatric specialists and interdisciplinary teams to assist that it is a family disease and that this is more than a clinical issue but a societal one Caregiver crisis More than 15 millions Americans provide unpaid care for people with dementia including Alzheimer s Thirty four percent are older than 65 Seventy five percent are employed Compared to caregivers for people without dementia twice as many caregivers of people with dementia report substantial financial emotional and physical difficulties These caregivers are more likely to report worsened health increased cardiovascular disease and depression Yet caregivers are often looked at as a means to an end to get patients to follow care plans How do we start accounting for the fact that the person for whom they are caring directly impacts their own health How do we factor the financial burden and the workplace implications of caregiving into a total family care plan Societal issue Because there is no cure for Alzheimer s providers often end up treating the conditions that manifest because of the disease Consider that the largest reasons for hospitalization of Alzheimer s patients are fainting falls and trauma I would venture to say that these are often caused more by environmental factors that are not in any care plan such as homes safe for aging in place dementia friendly businesses and communities An Advisory Board article on population health suggested that if you are going to partner with patients in managing their health you must integrate into their daily lives Providers can directly impact care by attracting and recruiting more people to specialize in geriatric medicine and adopting person centered practices in their care They can contribute by leading organizing and coalescing the community around the issues Here are some things we need to understand and do Realize there is not only age bias but also proscriptive prejudice in how we view older adults Change our demonizing language around the disease which alienates people and prevents them from self identifying Realize it starts in your own marketing departments and with your advertising agencies Educate the public create a groundswell Understand that other non intuitive partners such as bank tellers are on the front lines of identifying the behaviors that could suggest the disease Document the family caregiver in the medical record Start dementia registries Lead dementia friendly community initiatives Promote intergenerational interaction Talk about death and dying openly Cumulatively these actions will help providers achieve

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/04/08/does_population_health_management_really (2016-02-10)
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