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  • Hospital Impact - Healthcare workers' perceived role and the patient experience
    I do some general cleaning I keep up and routine preventive maintenance projects Laying bricks I had to throw that one in there Or might he surprise and inspire us as happened to President Kennedy The story goes that when Kennedy visited NASA headquarters he saw a janitor mopping the floor nearby Kennedy stopped his tour walked over extended his hand to shake the janitor s introduced himself Hi I m Jack Kennedy and asked What are you doing Instead of responding with the typical laundry list of janitorial duties and tasks he said I m helping to put a man on the moon Mr President If anyone at my hospital from senior leader to nurse to housekeeper to physician to maintenance man to valet to volunteer was asked What do you do here I hope they would answer with something like I help to heal or I help people live their lives more fully Cleveland Clinic President and CEO Delos Toby Cosgrove describes one of the first and critical steps the hospital took to launch its cultural transformation and patient experience efforts As of 2006 we no longer called them employees They became caregivers because each one of them plays a role in patient care There are no minor tasks in healthcare Every action contributes to patient outcomes which is why we re working toward total engagement Studies have shown that workforce engagement is linked to patient safety quality outcomes and patient satisfaction Caregivers need to be engaged to have a positive impact on patients and their fellow caregivers Cosgrove goes on in his most recent blog The move by Medicare and other payers to reward patient satisfaction is important But it will not make or break our institutions The real motivation for change needs to come from the heart Not everything can be measure by ROI We canâ t forget why we became doctors and nurses and administrators In the final analysis we work for a better patient experience because it s the right thing to do Intuitively we know that remaining in touch with why we chose healthcare in the first place makes a difference Creating opportunities for caregivers to reflect on purpose calling and mission as fellow Hospital Impact blogger Anthony Cirillo and others are rightly championing reinvigorates and re energizes that place of abundance within us where we desire and compassionately choose to help others heal and live their lives to the full The answer to What do you do here does affect the patient experience Doug Della Pietra is the director of Customer Services and Volunteers for Rochester General Hospital in New York where he directs an intentionally designed patient and family centered volunteer program oversees the front line valet and guest services teams and co chairs the hospital s Patient Experience Team Follow Doug DougDellaPietra on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/06/04/the_perceived_role_of_healthcare_workers (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - How to deliver a world-class patient experience
    memorable moment and requires anticipating needs that goes beyond the Golden Rule Do unto others as you would have them do to you It s not what YOU want to give the patient that matters he said In fact anticipating needs even surpasses the Platinum Rule Do unto others as they would like wish or desire Exceeding expectations Williams described demands the Double Platinum Rule Treat others how they don t even KNOW they want to be treated YET Engaging patients and their family members at this level necessitates an understanding of their deeper emotional spiritual and personal needs at the many and various service touch points along the continuum of care Engage Me If you don t have people who know how to engage your patients with a deep emotional connection Williams noted nothing else equipment technology a shiny new lobby etc matters What patients and their family members desire but may not always be able to articulate include some of the following sentiments shown in the brief video titled Engage Me Make me feel special Make me feel included Make me feel valued Make me feel appreciated Tell me that you are happy to see me Tell me that you are happy to serve me Welcome me as if I were a guest in your own home Tell me about the service that I am about to receive Thank me for choosing you Tell me it was a pleasure to serve me Make Sure They Know You Care Williams challenged participants If you want to enhance the patient experience our staff needs to communicate that it is a pleasure and an honor to serve you During Williams keynote someone asked How do I go about asking busy nurses to do one more thing To that Williams said Whether five minutes or five seconds make sure the person you re with knows you care That s great advice for any relationship with patients a patient s family member peers and or direct reports those senior to us our friends and own family members and et al Doug Della Pietra is the director of Customer Services and Volunteers for Rochester General Hospital in New York where he co chairs the hospital s Patient Experience Team in addition to responsibilities for an intentionally designed patient and family centered volunteer program and front line First Last Impression initiatives Follow Doug DougDellaPietra on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/04/29/how_to_deliver_a_world_class_patient_exp (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Make emotional connections for better patient experiences
    that patients and their family members have with our healthcare organizations can trigger memory making and story creating emotions that fashion patient perceptions In the end the patient s collage of memories forms the patient experience In What is Patient Experience Jennifer Robinson senior editor for the Gallup Business Journal emphasizes the critical importance of making an emotional connection with patients while meeting both their emotional needs and basic requirements for good service and medical care With that comes optimal patient experiences ones that are deeply personally gratifying and that promote health So how do we intentionally make emotional connections and meet the emotional needs of patients and their families without leaving it to chance Hostyn advises the following 1 Think of the memories you want to evoke then design for those memories NOT what messages to communicate or what media should carry them 2 Ask yourself what would make a magic moment Where would it be What would it involve How would it be staged How would it be remembered How would it be retold 3 Look for opportunities to relieve anxiety anticipate needs or surprise expectations 4 Ultimately design interactions that connect emotionally foster a sense of control build trust and relationships help people make informed decisions engage in conversation To illustrate think of the raw emotions of grieving family members after the death of a loved one In an effort to bring some peace and comfort to these moments of truth Sharp HospiceCare created its Memory Bear Program Family members provide articles of favorite clothing from their deceased loved ones Trained volunteers stitch the clothing into a memory bear which they give to the family on behalf of Sharp HospiceCare The memory bear not only plays an integral role in preserving the memory of the familyâ s loved one but also creates another storybook moment namely Sharp s personalized care and concern To summarize begin by taking inventory of the emotional moments of truth occurring every day throughout the continuum of care Next prioritize based on your patients and their families the most critical moments for making an emotional connection Then align design your people and processes to always make those emotional connections thereby creating experiences and stories that are according to Robinson deeply personally gratifying and that promote health Ultimately isn t that the most basic fundamental purpose of improving the patient experience Doug Della Pietra is the director of Customer Services and Volunteers for Rochester General Hospital in New York where he co chairs the hospital s Patient Experience Team in addition to responsibilities for an intentionally designed patient and family centered volunteer program and front line First Last Impression initiatives Follow Doug DougDellaPietra on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/04/01/make_emotional_connections_for_better_pa (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Build patient loyalty with personalized service recovery
    down as a deposit decorate the bike with balloons and note to her husband and have Zaneâ s put the bike in the window before they closed for the day They agreed Later that day after work the woman brought her husband to the bike shop along with some co workers to see her husbandâ s reaction They parked got out of the car and the woman said Go look in the window But the bike wasn t there Ticked off she left a voice message later that evening for Zane s The next morning Chris Zane and the store manager Tom got the woman s unhappy message A traditional service recovery approach could have led Chris and Tom to offer the woman a 10 percent off coupon free seat pack bike helmet headlamp or similar Instead their customer centric vision culture and values led them to take three critical steps First Chris and Tom blamed no one accepted full responsibility for the customer s experience and asked What are we going to do about this Next they viewed the experience both its immediate and lingering dimensions through the eyes of the customer Chris and Tom appreciated the frustration and disappointment felt by the woman when the bike wasn t in the window Also they sensed the equally important damaging and lasting aspects of the experience the negative impression left on the co workers and a soured Valentine s dinner for the couple later that evening Chris and Tom got it They personalized the service recovery by not only waiving the remaining balance owed for the bike but also recreating the Valentine s dinner for the couple catering lunch in the woman s office the next day for her co workers and delivering the bike and doing all of the fittings for the husband at their home that evening instead of at the store The woman was so delighted she kissed Tom the store s manager Only very dissatisfied and very satisfied patients have a story to tell satisfied ones don t Traditional service recovery merely assuages a patient s dissatisfaction Service recovery that is specific and personalized as illustrated by Zane s Cycles can transform moments of dissatisfaction into experiences that exceed expectations to such a degree that patients and their families have a new positive and memorable story about our hospitals to tell others Every patient encounter and interaction along the continuum of care even when we re attempting to recover after a poor patient experience is an opportunity to build relationship and create a positively memorable experience that creates patients for life and may even result in a kiss Doug Della Pietra is the director of Customer Services and Volunteers for Rochester General Hospital in New York where he co chairs the hospital s Patient Experience Team in addition to responsibilities for an intentionally designed patient and family centered volunteer program and front line First Last Impression initiatives Follow Doug DougDellaPietra on Twitter Leave a comment Please

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/03/04/create_patients_for_life_with_personaliz (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    patients family members visitors and others who 2 It s hard for me to feel compassion towards patients family members visitors and others who 1 Responses to the first statement include those who look upset have no family are distressed or in need or have health issues to which the team can personally relate Times when it is hard to feel compassion include people who are disrespectful mean condescending impatient and demanding have an attitude or feel entitled Read more Leave a comment Patient experience framework Human Business Human January 2nd 2013 by Doug Della Pietra After reading my December blog post one reader asked How do you train your front line staff Training is one dimension among other essentials organizational culture hiring onboarding processes employee engagement and satisfaction to name a few So here are a few thoughts on ways to help front line staff create an exceptional patient experience Read more Leave a comment Humanity The heart of patient experience success December 19th 2012 by Jason A Wolf As I look back at all that was written and shared during this past year on patient experience not only in my previous blog posts but in the words shared by so many patient experience leaders caregivers hospital administrators physicians patients and family members I was moved to find compelling powerful and even emotional themes As readers you were drawn to the stories shared about the experiences people had and it brought home an important point As much as we in healthcare strive to provide the best patient and family experience enact effective strategies and tactics and implement the required policies we must remember we are patients and family members ourselves In the talks I share and in visits to healthcare organizations I witness what I believe rests at the core of the healthcare experience we are human beings taking care of human beings Read more Leave a comment 4 key ingredients for creating an exceptional patient experience December 3rd 2012 by Doug Della Pietra While walking back to the infusion center from the hospital cafeteria my mom briefly stopped and held the wall railing to catch her breath Enter a maintenance man 10 feet away who asked Would you like a wheelchair My mom thanked him but graciously declined and we were on our way once again heading to the elevators We were both moved by his kind and proactive attention This man exceeded our expectations and two weeks later we re still talking about him With four key ingredients he transformed an ordinary moment into an extraordinary one for us and delivered an exceptional patient experience Read more Leave a comment Previous Page Next Page Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=Doug%20Della%20Pietra&page=1&disp=posts&paged=4 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - What is the danger of not listening to frontline staff?
    and more visits and more and more procedures to meet revenue goals rules the day The patients and families being impacted are an afterthought never mind in the center aka patient centered care Physicians have since left her practice and no one made sure patients were informed or provided with options And only now after receiving many patient complaints are we being told to try to fix the damage But it is too late We have lost the trust of these patients They feel abandoned Leadership is removed and isn t listening to us on the frontlines and patients and families are being harmed I am not valued and I am counting the days until I can leave this job The second quote came from a happenstance meeting earlier this week As my wife and I managed our yard sale a woman came up to us and asked Do you have any art supplies She then proceeded to share how she has opted to follow her other passion art because the hospital leaders where she worked cut the nurse to patient ratios to levels below what is safe made decisions based on drivers other than the drive to provide quality care and made decisions without listening to the frontline staff who witnessed firsthand the adverse affects on staff and patients The harm these decisions are doing to patients is scary no wonder hospital errors occur in one third of all hospital admissions according to an April 2011 study in Health Affairs And it s sad that the system has lost another seasoned caring nurse who is passionate about patient safety and yet silenced by her hospital leadership The third quote above was from an amazing physician assistant who is silenced in her own hospital and considered a troublemaker because she dared to address emergency room overutilization Her hospital leadership had opted to throw more and more money at the problem thus wasting limited financial resources rather than listen to those on the frontlines who hold great nuggets of wisdom and want to help Only in a forum outside of her hospital were her voice and amazing successes recognized and honored We continue to take for granted our most cherished resources our frontline staff These people are in the know they are passionate they care and they are the ones who are most connected to our patients These people must be heard if we are to truly improve the care we provide to patients and families while also managing our limited resources more effectively To all healthcare leaders I beseech you listen to your frontline staff engage them learn from them and honor them To all frontline staff please continue to manage up and tell your stories Please continue to share And if your organization s healthcare leaders won t listen please tell your stories to me I will Thomas H Dahlborg M S M is Vice President for Strategy and Project Director for the National Initiative for Children s Healthcare

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/05/30/really_listen_to_your_frontline_healthca (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Firsthand symptoms of a broken healthcare system
    greeted by an amazingly kind and loving nurse She gently guided Betty and my wife to the exam room the entire time providing comforting words of encouragement and referencing Betty s last visit and recent health challenges The nurse also determined through physical assessment that Betty s blood pressure was off and that she was struggling with her breath and words The nurse checked Betty s oxygen level and found it to be at 80 percent saturation far lower than a normal level of 98 to 100 percent saturation The nurse immediately informed the doctor and started Betty on oxygen Soon the doctor also began an examination After 10 minutes Betty and my wife left the exam room with the understanding that the doctor had e scribed two new medications The two new medicines included low dose Glypizide added only in the morning with her other diabetic medicine and low dose Spironlactone for her blood pressure and fluid retention The doctor stressed that the diuretic medicine MUST BE FILLED and administered that very day Now add to this that the doctor was unaware of a particular blood pressure medication that Betty had been on for years because the information did not cross over to the doctor s new Electronic Medical Record EMR And in fact the doctor almost misdiagnosed the situation because of the lack of data and his unwillingness to believe Betty when she reminded him that she was in fact still on this medication Betty was quite stressed about the whole ordeal and quite anxious to get her meds We immediately went to the pharmacy where we were informed that only one of the meds had been e scribed successfully but a second the diuretic that needed to be filled and administered the very same day was never received We then called the doctor s office to remind them to call in the prescription rather than simply e scribing it in All the while Betty became more and more anxious that she needed her diuretic A couple of anxiety filled hours later we had the diuretic and began the process of ensuring Betty knew how to administer the med We continue to check in with Betty and she is now doing very well She has her appropriate medications and understands how to administer them Her anxiety about her meds is in check as now she has a resource who will provide her with an ear a shoulder an open heart undivided attention and time my wife But as seen in this patient story technology while being a significant part of the solution to improve the healthcare system cannot be seen as the entire fix We cannot lose focus on patients and must leverage technology to enhance the time and relationship between the patient and the practitioner be the practitioner a physician a nurse or other health care provider True relationships breed trust and understanding and in this case a true relationship would have yielded a better outcome and

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2010/06/10/firsthand_symptoms_of_a_broken_healthcar (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Patient-centered care about more than just financial gains
    they implemented to evaluate the output of their patient centered efforts all financially driven rather than patient driven As I processed this information I then heard the following story Linda was scheduled for a hysterectomy due to severe pain caused by fibroids and endometriosis After three C sections she was hesitant but was losing so much blood her quality of life grew worse Linda had an insurance plan that required her to meet a co payment for surgeries A hospital admissions representative called her and did the pre admission registration over the telephone and a payment plan was agreed upon for the co payment Linda had the surgery and it was successful Post surgery while heavily medicated and still in post recovery on a GYN floor Linda received a call in her room from the hospital billing department They informed her she needed to pay her co payment in full before she was discharged Linda tried to explain that she had made prior arrangements for a payment plan but the billing person disagreed and reiterated payment is due prior to discharge Reminder Linda is in the hospital and in recovery after major surgery and on the same day as the surgery receiving a call from the hospital billing department Now Linda s post surgical stress elevated and she cried just as her nurse walked in Are you okay she asked Linda NO I AM NOT OKAY Linda began to tell the nurse what happened The nurse offered Linda pain medication as she could see her stress and pain increased with this phone call She also contacted a patient advocate The advocate came to Linda s room talked in length about what was happened met with the billing department and eventually Linda was discharged with the originally agreed to payment plan Patient centered care I think not Linda was grateful for her nurse and patient advocate but clearly this should have never happened in the first place Patient centered care must transcend the entire organization and all staff must understand the positive impact of patient centered care along with the adverse impact of not doing so As healthcare leaders we cannot allow patient centered care to simply be a buzzword Patient centered care must become the fabric of our healthcare system Patient centered care must permeate throughout the system yes even into the billing department It must resonate deeply from the president and CEO office throughout the organization and back again Even though it has the potential to do so patient centered care is not simply a tool to gain market share and to improve revenues Patient centered care is a commitment each and every one of us within the healthcare system must choose to honor to provide and to hold dear just as we should our patients our families our communities and one another As leaders we must position our teams to honor our commitment to patient centered care What is the very next thing you will do to ensure

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/07/24/patient_centered_care_about_more_than_ju (2016-02-10)
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