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  • Hospital Impact - Social media advertising is 'secret sauce' to engagement
    had some impressive engagement numbers During the course of the month it received 1 018 new likes The number of people discussing the page each day posting comments writing posts sharing posts etc rose to 85 per day from a previous total of around 5 per day If you re considering social media advertising here are some things to keep in mind Facebook Advertising Facebook is by far the most popular social media advertising platform and represents 85 percent of all social media advertising expenditures The goal of Facebook ads is to drive people to your page But more importantly it helps foster engagement by having people become a fan liking and sharing your content or posting a comment Engagement is essential because when a user visits a fan page and likes it the content is posted on their news feeds which is the way most people receive content instead of visiting a fan page We found that sponsored stories were effective asking people to check out our videos having a poll about our organization etc YouTube Advertising The good news about YouTube advertising is that one size doesn t fit all With four types of YouTube advertising you can pick the one that s right for your hospital Promoted videos This is a traditional advertising approach and is relatively inexpensive in which you bid on keywords associated to your video YouTube homepage ads This option allows you to own the YouTube masthead for 24 hours and reach its 23 million viewers Masthead ads allow you to include interactive elements like clips or games but they are the most costly and probably something only international brands can afford In stream ads This option allows you to run your video as an ad break before or during YouTube partner videos These ads come in two formats Standard in stream ads 15 or 30 seconds long and TrueView ads can be longer than 30 seconds where viewers have the option to skip after 5 seconds With TrueView in stream you are only charged if users completely view your ad or watch at least 30 seconds Text Overlay Ads Text Overlay standalone ads work with Google AdWords and generally appear within a video player or within the bottom 20 percent of a video stream s play space It s easy to see where your money is going since it s strictly pay per click We used In Search and In Display advertising to promote our videos on YouTube This meant that our videos appeared in the top of search results for relevant keywords and they appeared in the suggested videos at the right of related YouTube videos We also developed some ads that were similar to YouTube ads with a 25 character headline and two lines of ad copy with 35 characters each Content Advertising If your hospital has a blog or a steady flow of original content you also should consider a content advertising service such as Outbrain You are probably familiar

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/11/28/social_media_advertising_is_secret_sauce (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    Accountability Act violations while others may not have the dedicated staff needed to feed the beast and regularly post meaningful content on Facebook and Twitter But take heart There are some simple social media strategies hospitals can implement that won t raise your blood pressure Read more Leave a comment Hospital social media Less may be more June 6th 2012 by Jenn Riggle In today s super sized world people seem to think that bigger is better However when it comes to healthcare marketing less can be more People today are multi taskers who have a hard time reading a blog let alone War and Peace We re all looking for ways to get smarter faster and do more with less Here are some things to think about You can have too much of a good thing even Facebook pages Everyone seems to love Facebook so why shouldn t your hospital have seven or eight Facebook pages After all you can have one for each hospital in your system or each service line While this may make sense at first the danger is that you ll end up building the brand for the local hospital or the service line at the expense of the larger system In addition having multiple Facebook pages can make management unwieldy and result in static pages or the same information being posted on multiple pages Read more Leave a comment Reclaim your healthcare social media voice April 11th 2012 by Jenn Riggle As hospital marketing professionals our job is to help our clients find the right words Whether it s developing key messages helping them tell their story or handling crisis situations we ve become masters of diplomacy and the sound bite The challenge We ve gotten so good at helping others find their voice we sometimes lose our own This can pose a problem since our work increasingly requires us to engage in social media which rewards those who speak their minds and make snarky comments Nowhere is this more relevant than when it comes to writing a blog which is all about creating thought leadership and having a unique point of view Read more Leave a comment Should your hospital have an interest in Pinterest February 20th 2012 by Nancy Cawley Jean Yes there s another social network that is all over the news It s called Pinterest and it seems you can t read a newspaper or scroll through your RSS feed without stumbling upon another post or article about this hot new network Even the Wall Street Journal is covering it So what is Pinterest It is described as a virtual pinboard that allows users to create bulletin boards by pinning images and videos they come across on the web and categorize customized boards Common themes for boards include books I ve read places I ve traveled to and favorite recipes Apparently users have called it completely addictive Its largest demographic is women Read more Leave a comment Previous Page Next

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=jenn%20riggle&page=1&disp=posts&paged=4 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - The patient experience family is growing--and it should
    efforts are diluted by other organizational priorities From this it is clear organizations are still struggling with how to best address patient experience issue What started as an issue about organizational change two years ago has shifted to an issue of focus I would suggest this is a positive trend as it shows organizationsâ efforts are maturing and now are experiencing the challenges of that progress The drivers also support this trend with clear support from the top remaining the number one driver for patient experience success From all I have seen a serious commitment is needed to effectively drive patient experience efforts forward These actions are not nor should they be simple checklists and the outcomes often require a broader understanding of the impact these efforts have This requires a visionary creative and agile leader who sees the bigger picture understands the real value and is willing to invest in what she or he knows is right The second significant change in drivers is the addition of the formal patient experience structure or role to drive efforts forward This increase in recognition that experience requires clear defined leadership is a significant statement Yet it remains something many organizations are still struggling to figure out Moving beyond organizational efforts it has been exciting to watch the family of organizations addressing the patient experience issue expand as well Some great examples are independent efforts like the Institute for Healthcare Improvement s expanded patient experience learning and Planetree s and the Institute for Patient and Family Centered Care s focus on patient centeredness as well as efforts such as the AHA affiliated Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy and the Cleveland Clinic affiliated Association for Patient Experience The list is expanding even further as vendors and resource providers are raising the issue of patient experience providing supporting information and materials and reinforcing their role in patient experience improvement As one committed to this cause my hope and unwavering intent is to work every day to create a global community and gathering place at The Beryl Institute where all these ideas can be fostered and shared With that as motivation the trends I shared are extremely encouraging Patient experience is growing the family is expanding the priority is solidifying and all of this is good I often open and close my talks with the simple fact that patient experience improvement is first and foremost about choice The choice now is to move forward engage our patients our families our teams and associates and our community While the climb may not always be easy this is a journey that will reap great rewards for all To get there like family we must all do it together Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute where he specializes in organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Follow Jason jasonawolf and The Beryl Institute berylinstitute on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/08/21/title_112 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - A call to action in improving patient experience
    topic of conversation I make these points to challenge all of us in the healthcare community and to raise the stakes on the opportunity we have created for ourselves There is a consistent recognition that patient experience is central to all we do yet our efforts may not match our words So what are we to do This is a call to action that I think we all must heed Great efforts are underway across facilities practices and systems we must support and sustain that focus In moving to success I offer a few considerations taken from organizations that are moving to a state of sustained positive action Definition Organizations must define what the patient experience is and will be in every encounter Without definition there is no basis for action What are the keys to your definition of patient experience and how will you enact them every day Expectations It is through its people that an organization ultimately delivers on its promises What are the expectations you place on first attracting and retaining the right people and then on the behaviors they exemplify in every encounter every day Expectations and the willingness to follow through on their application is what breeds and feeds a culture of accountability Transparency How brave are you prepared to be first in your willingness to communicate with your own people on where you are succeeding and falling short and then with your patients families and communities to underline your commitment to excellence Transparency should not be left to government mandates it should be a bold and brave effort at continuous and active improvement Agility Healthcare has been built on hierarchy process and protocol This is not bad as it has ensured quality and consistency in care Yet we cannot let these structures make us inflexible They should not translate into our organizational endeavors and in particular our interpersonal encounters The current state of healthcare requires us to flex bend and yes change with consistency as well to ensure the best in experience Follow through This is action in its ultimate form how willing we are to do what we say not just once but every time with every individual in every situation we may encounter It is only in our follow through that action is realized and it never truly ends Significant efforts have been made to move the conversation on patient experience forward It has been a profound and broad effort by many to ensure it has happened My thoughts here are meant to stir us from what might be seen as the complacency found in declaring some thing or idea important The opportunity revealed is that of action and in taking on that challenge only great things can happen Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute where he specializes in organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Follow Jason jasonawolf and The Beryl Institute berylinstitute on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/03/27/a_call_to_action_in_improving_patient_ex (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Revisiting the patient experience balancing act: 3 considerations
    s Global Patient Family Advisory Council shared three additional balancing acts we face in patient experience improvement The balancing of What s The Matter and What Matters To You Bisognano This simple but powerful statement focuses on expanding perspective The idea that the care experience is about determining what ails or is a cause of concern for patients is something we would never remove from the conversation This enables the science of medicine to work But the balancing perspective is what matters to the patient in the process We don t offer procedures simply because as caregivers we believe it must happen We must consider what matters to those in our care as well The balancing of improving care and improving wellness Berwick This idea about extending the continuum shifts the systemic view of healthcare and expands the experience conversation beyond only care to overall health This provides a shifting for healthcare organizations to think forward in terms of a true population health strategy Not for the sake of policy but rather for the greater good and wellness of those in their respective communities There is great power in helping people avoid the need for care by engaging in a broad range of preventative and proactive efforts This will become an increasingly important part of the healthcare experience and extends the conversation and the impact we can have The balancing of about or to and with This is a fundamental message about reinforcing partnership We consistently hear from patients and family members who do not wish to be subjects of their experience but partners in it Patients and family members are wise enough to know they are not medical experts but at the same time no one knows their individual situation better then they do To create partnership as part of the patient experience is a critical point of balancing between doing to and with and ensuring true engagement in the healthcare process The patient experience conversation held in isolation of the patient perspective was a troubling one With this we must realize each and every one of us may be that patient or family member at the bedside one day dealing with a tough choice working through a troubling diagnosis or celebrating good news or a medical success Our ability to thrive and contribute in the healthcare environment today may boil down to our willingness to give up on the â œrightâ answer and know we have great opportunity to be in a balancing act around the critical questions that will impact the experience for all in our care As we look to the year ahead I encourage you to be open to the questions that will arise rather than in search of the one right answer I urge you to take on the balancing act in providing the best in patient experience for all we serve Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute where he specializes in organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/01/02/revisiting_the_patient_experience_balanc (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Balancing act: Sustaining patient experience efforts
    diverse and broad input by questioning and seeking information The power of effective leadership in sustaining performance is to incorporate the voices of many in driving continuous outcomes The leader able to manage this delicate shift from directing to asking will create more informed more engaged and more energized organizations The balancing act for people individualism and collaboration There is much to be said for the concept of the right people on the bus which is ensuring we have more than just the right skills but that we have the right fit of people in an organization Yet simply having a collection of the right individuals does not ensure sustaining efforts It is the ability of these individuals to think and more importantly act collectively and collaboratively that drive performance Especially in healthcare collaborative efforts can be one of the greatest strengths in differentiating your organization and driving outcomes The balancing act for culture consistency and agility Organizations seem to strive these days for clarity in mission vision and values These structures help shape the foundation on which the culture of an organization is built All too often they only become signs on a wall Sustaining performance is about bringing life to these ideas while recognizing that organizations today must act with agility the ability to rapidly reconfigure respond and resolve issues in a moment s notice If one trumps the other your purpose becomes too rigid or your organization may lack clarity in direction This is the most crucial of balancing acts as culture sits at the core of the definition of patient experience itself As my research shows sustaining performance is not about checklists or prescribed tactics These are static and passing acts Rather it is about commitment and focus it is about making a choice to act to move from the if to the how The very opportunity for sustaining patient experience efforts may be in the word movement itself It is grounded in the fundamental idea that patient experience is not an initiative to be prioritized as part of a list of strategies vying for resources and attention It has much greater importance in our healthcare system today Instead patient experience is about ongoing action It is part of the fabric of healthcare and should be woven into every effort you take on as a healthcare organization In focusing patient experience on the art of balancing versus simply an end to be achieved you guarantee it is an integrated part of who you are as an organization every day Your patients families and communities deserve no less Jason A Wolf Ph D is executive director of The Beryl Institute where he specializes in organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Follow Jason jasonawolf and The Beryl Institute berylinstitute on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/07/11/balancing_act_sustaining_patient_experie (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - What if patients designed experience surveys?
    and continue to suggest but the realization of what many of us in healthcare overlook at times that we too are patients we too are family members friends and loved ones and there are things we wish to share Now this is not an argument about validity purpose focus or intent of existing surveys or a suggestion that questions generated in this way would be representative or statistically valid We also must acknowledge that surveys such as HCAHPS are now mandated and take up both time and budget resources that could impede asking more But perhaps that is my point in striving for clear measures is it possible we are potentially missing something important and significant in really improving experience overall As I ask about patients and or family members designing the HCAHPS survey I ve seen some of the following themes emerge and while some could argue some ideas already are represented in current surveys the point here is not one of explaining away but of listening Emerging themes include Effectiveness of the care overall Were the outcomes those we discussed or what I expected and if not was it clear why Clarity and explanation Was time taken at all points in the care continuum to help me understand process procedure diagnosis or rationale outcomes required actions personal commitments etc Understanding of my needs Did someone take the time to clarify my needs and expectations and help me see which of them could or could not be met based on the situation Coordination and teamwork While individual responsiveness or communication may have been positive did my team work well together or convey confidence in their coordination or alignment around my care Respect of my uniqueness Was I treated as an individual or rather just a part of a repeatable process Listening and inquiry Did anyone take the time to truly listen to me beyond being responsive Highlights or impactful moments What situation or individual provided a remarkable encounter and what did they do As noted above this is not a critique of what we do but rather recognition that we may be missing something This is more than a nice exercise in including the voice of the patient This is an effort to ensure the best in experience outcomes that of quality safety and service in each and every healthcare encounter If we challenge ourselves as healthcare organizations to consider what we would like to be asked or take the bold step to ask our patients and their families what they would like to be asked we may have all we need to know to move the needle up and from one of simple quantity to the quality of the encounter overall So if it were you what would you want to be asked I invite you to join the conversation Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute where he specializes in organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Follow Jason jasonawolf and

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/11/20/let_patients_design_experience_surveys (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Quality trumps size in patient experience
    searching for a way to address the situation While I could hear her furiously typing she also was engaging me in a discussion on my service what questions I had and if there was anything else I needed Before we could even finish that discussion she exclaimed Problem solved She had altered my plan so I could avoid overage charges for the month rather than saying sorry there is nothing I can do or making me feel like they only wanted my money Throughout the call I was cared for as an individual and in the end I left the call wowed by the experience I was provided and a more loyal customer than when I dialed We have that same opportunity for experience in healthcare In the latest paper from The Beryl Institute Voices from the C Suite Perspectives on the Patient Experience a similar story of personal initiative and care was shared One that exemplifies many moments I have heard of in healthcare systems around the world In this case a family was expecting a baby but only days before the due date the husband was admitted to the hospital with a significant illness When the wife went into labor there was no way her husband would be able to join her He was at risk of missing the birth of his first child A labor and delivery nurse quickly improvised working with the IT team she was able to acquire two iPads with cameras bringing one to the father to be and one to the wife in delivery While only floors apart but separated by illness this nurse and the team brought together a new family creating a moment that could be shared and a memory for a lifetime These examples are not the result of extensive organizational efforts rather they are true examples of bringing together the freedom of choice and the opportunity to express care in our healthcare organizations They represent the power that can be found in creating an organizational culture that supports individual action for what is right More importantly they reinforce that when driving towards patient experience outcomes it is critical to focus on the ability to deliver on the little things above all else Patients and families are not wowed by the programs you put in place what consultants you hire or what vendors you engage though they can influence action and outcome They are affected by the moments you create between people sacred personal encounters where they are made to feel human and recognized as individuals These moments are about choice they are about responsibility and they are about quality With experience what matters most may very well be the littlest things and that may be the biggest thing of all Jason A Wolf Ph D is executive director of The Beryl Institute where he specializes in organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Follow Jason jasonawolf and The Beryl Institute berylinstitute on Twitter Leave a comment Please

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/01/23/quality_trumps_size_for_patient_experien (2016-02-10)
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