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  • Hospital Impact
    patient experience itself that the drivers of experience excellence are grounded not just in process excellence but also in the very fibers that comprise our healthcare organizations and systems That is the culture and leadership at all levels that drive how decisions are made how interactions take place and how outcomes are achieved Read more Leave a comment In five years the patient experience movement has come a long way September 17th 2015 by Jason A Wolf Earlier this week our community The Beryl Institute turned 5 years old In the context of healthcare as an industry these five years are but a flash in time but in the landscape of patient experience improvement as a central conversation to healthcare it represents a significant segment in a new and expanding conversation In my first Hospital Impact blog now almost four years ago I was exploring what we learned in our first State of Patient Experience benchmarking research and examining the state of what I believed was an emerging field in healthcare itself I offered What I have found in my encounters with healthcare leaders is that while patient experience may be seen by some as a fad based on recent policy i e a must do for now until the environment shifts it is gaining greater traction as leaders now have the air cover needed to address patient experience as the right thing to do in a way they may not have been able to before Read more Leave a comment Why I fired my doctor and he doesn t even know August 27th 2015 by Jason A Wolf I have thought for some time about this story and have shared it with others on various occasions It has stirred interesting conversation but more often mutual head nodding and the emergence of similar experiences It is a personal patient experience story that helps illustrate the broad reaches of the experience conversation in healthcare and I hope one that stirs thoughts from all perspectives on what we need to do to ensure continued awareness of and focus on this issue I had a scheduled appointment for months for my annual physical last fall Unfortunately the day prior to my appointment there was an emergency and I had to cancel so I called my physician s practice to reschedule After a lengthy effort and numerous apologies the scheduler finally offered a new date for a physical six months away in the early winter of this year While that was surprising I liked and trusted my physician and was willing to wait that time In the weeks prior to my February appointment I began to get the automated calls from the practice reminding me of my appointment how important it was I make the appointment and providing instructions on contacting the practice in advance of any need to cancel to avoid potential fees or other issues These calls even while automated were thoughtful reminders of not just timing but requirements for my appointment

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?s=Jason+A.+Wolfe&sentence=AND&submit=Search (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Guiding principles for patient experience excellence
    to make a fundamental shift in both acknowledging and working to address the very vulnerabilities this conversation raises then we may never ultimately realize our true intent I do believe that there is an opportunity readily available to us all One grounded in the guiding principles that have emerged from the experiences of so many tackling this work These guiding principles for patient experience excellence first shared by The Beryl Institute last year represent eight areas for strong and focused action unwavering commitment and personal and organizational self awareness They are offered as aspirational and affirmative statements about where we as individuals organizations and collectively as the patient experience movement should focus our efforts Rather than the answer we believe these provide the foundational ideas on which we can build our work I invite and encourage healthcare organizations globally to consider and commit to putting these ideas into practice in the ways best suited for their organization With a focus on these principles we believe organizations and systems committed to providing the best in experience will Identify and support accountable leadership with committed time and focused intent to shape and guide experience strategy Establish and reinforce a strong vibrant and positive organizational culture and all it comprises Develop a formal definition for what experience is to their organization Implement a defined process for continuous patient and family input and engagement Engage all voices in driving comprehensive systemic and lasting solutions Look beyond clinical experience of care to all interactions and touch points Focus on alignment across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between Encompass both a focus on healing and a commitment to well being In choosing to engage in these principles organizations create a strongly woven foundation on which to apply their tactics of choice and establish a framework for intentional focus commitment and therefore the sustainability we all strive for in this work Perhaps it is that fear of what has come before and our inability to maintain a focus on what we believed to be so important that left us feeling that same vulnerability that brave individual shared with me As The Beryl Institute has noted we have a unique opportunity in healthcare today to shift how we think about patient experience and focus on what we can do about it fundamentally for all engaged in our healthcare organizations at all touch points and segments of the care continuum across care environments at points of transition and in the critical spaces in between As guiding principles the work is ultimately up to you By seizing the opportunity for action and the potential for the outcomes to which it can lead you take a bold stand in acknowledging that as human beings we are all vulnerable and this work may never truly be easy But it is without question the most significant rewarding and profound opportunity we may ever have as one human being to another We must continue to move forward Jason A Wolf

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2016/01/21/p5725 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - A healthcare CEO's take on what it means to be a 'superboss'
    responsibility for the mentoring of others now falls to you to a much a greater extent As the CEO seeking talent for my organization and perhaps employees whom I may eventually mentor I first look from within At a recent meeting of our senior and middle management about 100 people I asked who in the room had been advanced or promoted in the organization I was amazed that the great majority of those in attendance raised their hands We have been very fortunate in honing the talent from within but I also recognize that there are occasions when talent from the outside should be sought We just recruited an executive director for our Cancer Center who is from the Pacific Northwest and has never held an executive level position in a cancer program However he is young and dynamic and brings skills to our program that will truly set us apart from other programs bordering our service area The expectation is that he will approach problems from a different perspective be a quick study and be honed for a future promotional opportunity within the organization The HBR article states that superbosses employ practices that set them head and shoulders above even the best traditional bosses They seek talent differently and create high expectations Throughout the article there are excellent suggestions on how we can become better leaders within our organizations Who knows maybe after reading the book or even the article and applying the superboss approach we can more easily make that leap from a traditional boss to a superboss Barry Ronan is the president and CEO of Western Maryland Health System in Cumberland Maryland Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2016/01/21/title_152 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    a comment Value based care requires trading competition for collaboration October 15th 2015 by Barry Ronan Last week I read the results of a survey on value based care delivery that got my attention The survey stated that approximately 80 percent of U S hospitals are at best evolving toward value based care delivery with only 3 percent fully engaged in such care delivery In 2010 Maryland began a value based care delivery demonstration project that then encompassed 10 hospitals in the state including the Western Maryland Health System By January 2014 all Maryland hospitals were included in the new care delivery model For the last five years WMHS has been caring for patients in the most appropriate setting whether it s acute pre acute or post acute care Under this care delivery model we had to reach out to our competitors and begin collaborating with each of them For example when we contacted an urgent care provider in our community its response was we don t partner with hospitals we compete with them But after explaining that our care delivery model was now based on value not volume and that they could help keep our patients out of our emergency department they got it Read more Leave a comment Adding credence to the ideal traits of a healthcare CEO June 25th 2015 by Barry Ronan Last week I read the FierceHealthcare article 5 traits of the ideal healthcare CEO I am here to tell you that the article which was based on a recent Hospitals and Health Networks article was right on the money As CEO of the Western Maryland Health System in Cumberland Maryland I am beginning my fifth year under value based care delivery and I have certainly had to adjust my approach to managing under a new care delivery model Taking the five traits one by one I offer the following insights based on my experience Embrace Change The change has been amazing in that I along with my management team our staff and our physicians have had to virtually re learn every aspect of care delivery under a global budget We are partnering with everyone even those who were previously our competitors and we try to keep the patient at the center of everything that we do Read more Leave a comment The tangible benefits of physician engagement March 25th 2015 by Barry Ronan I am often asked how I engaged physicians as we were transitioning to value based care delivery After conferring with my executive team I created the President s Clinical Quality Council which proved to be an excellent way to engage our providers I asked six physicians who were the early adopters on the medical staff if they would join the council I then asked them to identify six of their colleagues whom they thought would be strong additions to the group They provided me with a great list from which to choose and the council was assembled These 12 physicians from

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?s=Barry+Ronan&sentence=AND&submit=Search (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - A healthcare CEO's take on what it means to be a 'superboss'
    responsibility for the mentoring of others now falls to you to a much a greater extent As the CEO seeking talent for my organization and perhaps employees whom I may eventually mentor I first look from within At a recent meeting of our senior and middle management about 100 people I asked who in the room had been advanced or promoted in the organization I was amazed that the great majority of those in attendance raised their hands We have been very fortunate in honing the talent from within but I also recognize that there are occasions when talent from the outside should be sought We just recruited an executive director for our Cancer Center who is from the Pacific Northwest and has never held an executive level position in a cancer program However he is young and dynamic and brings skills to our program that will truly set us apart from other programs bordering our service area The expectation is that he will approach problems from a different perspective be a quick study and be honed for a future promotional opportunity within the organization The HBR article states that superbosses employ practices that set them head and shoulders above even the best traditional bosses They seek talent differently and create high expectations Throughout the article there are excellent suggestions on how we can become better leaders within our organizations Who knows maybe after reading the book or even the article and applying the superboss approach we can more easily make that leap from a traditional boss to a superboss Barry Ronan is the president and CEO of Western Maryland Health System in Cumberland Maryland Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2016/01/21/p5724 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - The 10 traits of a great healthcare organization
    needs and wants must be addressed First of course is the patient and as healthcare evolves toward a consumer oriented culture it will be imperative for organizations to orient themselves to a market or customer base and away from a sales or provider base In clinically integrated networks this imperative expands to healthcare provider partners physicians and other care giving organizations payers large employers regulators e g the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services and community based organizations e g schools municipalities etc Thus customer service now includes all significant partners who make a significant difference to achieve optimum healthcare outcomes V Continual improvement and reduction of operating costs Quality is a journey and not a destination Value determines that the optimum outcome is associated with the lowest possible cost and these are ultimately unattainable goals that must be continually sought in order to be nearly achieved High performing organizations are obsessed with both quality and cost and everyone knows the score because measurement for everyone within their organization is un blinded and transparent This is a scary prospect for low performing organizations with wide discrepancies in performance however it is a necessary attribute to approach the best that we can achieve VI Expanded focus to disease management and population health The United States healthcare industry is transitioning from a sickness to a health industry Fee for service reimbursement rewards those who generate ancillary and elective procedure revenue and not those who seek to keep our populations healthy Thus organizations that are serious about healthcare are building a population health infrastructure to include palliative care in and outpatient disease management retail medicine e health platforms and home health all linked with predictive clinical business analytics They are also are voluntarily exiting fee for service toward a more risk based capitated business model that rewards health and cost effective care VII HIM sophistication Predictive clinical and business analytics are no longer optional and organizations that invest in this essential technology along with a health information exchange linking all of the components of a clinically integrated network will achieve optimum outcomes and drive out millions of dollars in waste Healthy people want 24 7 access to routine healthcare services through their smart phones and androids whereas older patients want to optimize their lives around their home through the use of wireless technology and predictive clinical analytics to guide them and their providers The 20th century healthcare model of the hospital and doctor s office will be replaced by technology that can provide immediate access to healthcare anywhere and anytime VIII Interdisciplinary teams The aviation industry went through a painful transition from the charismatic leader to the high performing team through crew resource management It is intuitive that if you put the right individuals with complimentary skills together that group can accomplish more than its individual members alone However this concept is counter to the traditional cultural norm of the autonomous professional High performing organizations restrict autonomy to when necessary and perform at a

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2016/01/21/the_10_traits_of_a_great_healthcare_orga (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    H Burroughs Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg s minority opinion in the 2014 Burwell v Hobby Lobby Supreme Court case was prescient She predicted that the majority opinion favoring the right of closely held corporations a corporation in which five or fewer shareholders own more than 50 percent equity of the organization to opt out of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act s mandate to provide birth control coverage to employees on the basis of religious objection would be a slippery slope She stated that there are thousands of closely held corporations in the United States e g In N Out Burger and Forever 21 that could conceivably opt out of any federal law for religious reasons without any guidance from the Supreme Court as to the limitations of their objections Flash forward a little more than a year The Supreme Court has agreed to take up seven cases from throughout the country that have come before appeals courts contesting the current policy that permits religious employers to opt out of their obligation to provide birth control by relegating this responsibility to either the government or private insurance companies simply by notifying their insurers third party administrators or the government Several religious organizations such as Little Sisters of the Poor and the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington D C argue that this makes them complicit in violation of their religious beliefs Read more Leave a comment ICD 10 Collaborative ways to reduce operating costs October 29th 2015 by Jonathan H Burroughs With the introduction of ICD 10 on Oct 1 there are now 132 500 new codes and new ways for healthcare organizations to be paid less based upon inadequate documentation or worse documentation that does not support the services rendered Thus it is incumbent upon healthcare leaders and physicians to come up with new ways to manage documentation through clinical documentation improvement CDI initiatives that lower operating costs improve the accuracy of documentation and improve the effectiveness of revenue cycle management performance What are organizations doing and how does this impact a physician s work flow I Training programs ICD 10 training programs have emerged as an opportunistic industry however organizations can deal with training physicians nurses and healthcare personnel in a far more cost effective way Most clinicians work with approximately 30 40 DRGs that make up 80 percent of their clinical practice It is important that they have at their fingertips the most common DRGs they are likely to encounter with a list of the documentation elements necessary to optimize reimbursement given any level of acuity Even better is to imbed decision support tools in the computerized physician order entry system so that if key elements are missing they may be given decision prompts Read more Leave a comment Medical overuse and why fee for service must go September 3rd 2015 by Jonathan H Burroughs It should not be a surprise to anyone why medical overuse occurs The traditional and politicized discounted fee for service reimbursement

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?s=Jonathan+Burroughs&sentence=AND&submit=Search (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - The 10 traits of a great healthcare organization
    needs and wants must be addressed First of course is the patient and as healthcare evolves toward a consumer oriented culture it will be imperative for organizations to orient themselves to a market or customer base and away from a sales or provider base In clinically integrated networks this imperative expands to healthcare provider partners physicians and other care giving organizations payers large employers regulators e g the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services and community based organizations e g schools municipalities etc Thus customer service now includes all significant partners who make a significant difference to achieve optimum healthcare outcomes V Continual improvement and reduction of operating costs Quality is a journey and not a destination Value determines that the optimum outcome is associated with the lowest possible cost and these are ultimately unattainable goals that must be continually sought in order to be nearly achieved High performing organizations are obsessed with both quality and cost and everyone knows the score because measurement for everyone within their organization is un blinded and transparent This is a scary prospect for low performing organizations with wide discrepancies in performance however it is a necessary attribute to approach the best that we can achieve VI Expanded focus to disease management and population health The United States healthcare industry is transitioning from a sickness to a health industry Fee for service reimbursement rewards those who generate ancillary and elective procedure revenue and not those who seek to keep our populations healthy Thus organizations that are serious about healthcare are building a population health infrastructure to include palliative care in and outpatient disease management retail medicine e health platforms and home health all linked with predictive clinical business analytics They are also are voluntarily exiting fee for service toward a more risk based capitated business model that rewards health and cost effective care VII HIM sophistication Predictive clinical and business analytics are no longer optional and organizations that invest in this essential technology along with a health information exchange linking all of the components of a clinically integrated network will achieve optimum outcomes and drive out millions of dollars in waste Healthy people want 24 7 access to routine healthcare services through their smart phones and androids whereas older patients want to optimize their lives around their home through the use of wireless technology and predictive clinical analytics to guide them and their providers The 20th century healthcare model of the hospital and doctor s office will be replaced by technology that can provide immediate access to healthcare anywhere and anytime VIII Interdisciplinary teams The aviation industry went through a painful transition from the charismatic leader to the high performing team through crew resource management It is intuitive that if you put the right individuals with complimentary skills together that group can accomplish more than its individual members alone However this concept is counter to the traditional cultural norm of the autonomous professional High performing organizations restrict autonomy to when necessary and perform at a

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2016/01/21/p5723 (2016-02-10)
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