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  • Hospital Impact - Defining true measures of healthcare success
    approaching me after the game saying Those boys we have never seen that type of maturity focus determination and HEART in all of our years of refereeing than we saw tonight What an amazing team What fine young men When I am challenged at work I often look back on that one incredible game and think about what those young men taught me and how I can use those lessons in the midst of a healthcare world that judges based on metrics that may not be the true measure of success I mulled this all over as I was developing measures of success for a partner organization I have seen this organization evolve and grow under great leadership I have also seen their measures of success that are truly amazing and yet clearly not what the outside world wants to see And again I reflect back on that special night I also often turn to the blog It s About the Dash that focuses on the on a gravestone between the person s year of birth and year of death and the measure s of a person s life during their lifetime It s another great reminder for each of us to choose our measures wisely As you look at your own organization as you review your organization s vision and mission and perhaps your own vision and mission how are you measuring success As part of this reflective process have you also looked into your own heart and the heart of your organization to define measure s of success that are aligned with what you are truly seeking to achieve Have you also created an aligned measurement strategy which takes into account all these factors Measuring success is critical to achieving success You cannot manage what you cannot measure Defining success is just as critical The next time you look into the eyes of your board your funder s your staff your patients your customers the next time you as a leader look in the mirror be sure you have a clear definition of success based on what will best position your organization and yourself for optimal outcomes a measurement strategy and plan in place to ensure you remain on the most favorable pathway to achieving the defined success and SMART measures aligned with your and your organization s defined success The delivery of optimal healthcare will continue to be full of challenges and yet these challenges can and will be mitigated by leaders who mindfully define measure and manage their own success and the success of their organizations One final note Beware of those red numbers glaring in your eyes They may not be the true measure of your or your organization s success Thomas H Dahlborg M S M is Vice President for Strategy and Project Director for the National Initiative for Children s Healthcare Quality NICHQ where he focuses on improving child health and well being He has 23 years of experience leading collaboratively creating optimal

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/04/04/title_45 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    be as simple as that One will not discover any of the above without a relationship with the patient Hilda Kidder Read more Leave a comment Overcome healthcare fears with courageous leadership January 4th 2012 by Thomas Dahlborg These are challenging times in healthcare an obvious observation Perhaps not so obvious is the fear that exists in the healthcare system People are scared Patients are scared Your staff is scared Maybe as leaders you are scared The fear throughout the system is palpable It is tangible It is harmful It is injurious to each of us and it is adversely affecting our ability to honor our commitments to our patients our staff our communities and one another Today I want to focus on the fears of us healthcare leaders and those of our staff and provide an opportunity for both sharing and learning Read more Leave a comment NPR interview highlights health center s bartering program October 11th 2011 Hospital Impact blogger Tom Dahlborg was recently featured in an interview on National Public Radio touting True North Health Center s barter program Falmouth Maine based True North allows patients to barter their time and services in exchange for treatments they otherwise couldn t afford he told NPR s Morning Edition The nonprofit clinic accepts time dollars from patients who perform services needed in the community like raking leaves mowing lawns organizing or providing caregiver support to people caring for an older parent among other odd jobs to earn the currency In exchange these patients receive access to integrative healthcare services at True North and can spend up to an hour or more with their doctors By giving people a way to pay for their care the focus is on giving receiving and maintaining one s self esteem and dignity Dahlborg said about the alternative monetary system in a previous Hospital Impact blog post Congratulations to Tom for a great interview that reached millions of listeners Leave a comment The gilded age of healthcare September 7th 2011 by Thomas Dahlborg Recently my family and I visited a plethora of colleges in Rhode Island as my oldest daughter seeks her life s path On our way from Bristol to Newport I shared with my family my days of working for Harvard Community Health Plan in that area and the large disparity between the wealthiest and the poorest in Newport at that time mid 1990s After a brief tête à tête my wife and I agreed to take a slight excursion from the college tours and visit two of the Mansions in Newport the Breakers and Marble House As we began the self guided audio tour I was again thinking about the wealth disparity back in the 1990s and how large the disparity must have been in the 1880s Just as I started to process how conceptually things have not changed I heard in my ears from the self guided tour the words of Mark Twain s The Gilded Age The gilded age

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=true%20north&page=1&disp=posts&paged=5 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Set rules for docs on social media
    as thought leaders in the healthcare and social media and to simply share information Kevin Pho KevinMD on Twitter and on his blog and Wendy Sue Swanson SeattleMamaDoc on Twitter and a blogger for Seattle Children s Hospital are two people who immediately come to mind They learned early on the power of social media and have been touting the benefits of connecting with people through these channels for years They ve been tweeting speaking at conferences and becoming leaders in the industry through their openness to and their acceptance of new technology to reach people help people and just maybe make people healthier Don t forget the other side of the coin There have been some well publicized cases of physicians using social media inappropriately In one such case a R I physician posted protected patient information on Facebook She was fined and she removed her Facebook account In a more recent case a physician clearly stepped over the line when talking about a patient s chronic lateness and a stillbirth That s why having official guidelines is not only recommended but also a necessary part of hospital business these days Well before the R I Board of Medical Licensure and Discipline developed its guidelines we developed rules for our physicians By arming our physicians with the information they needed they would be less likely to get into trouble and perhaps be less timid about using social media as a communication tool When the R I Board came out with its guidelines we saw it as an opportunity to remind our own physicians of the guidelines we already had in place From our own RIHospital I m thrilled that one of our emergency medicine doctors Megan Ranney M D MeganRanney has taken to Twitter like a pro The Associated Press even interviewed her for a story on the release of the new social media guidelines I do think you have to use your professional judgment Ranney said in the article She also gave good advice think twice before posting something In today s social world hospital communications and marketing efforts must include keeping doctors abreast of the many uses of social media Get them on board let them comment let them blog being social can help position your hospital s brand positively if of course the tools are used appropriately Do you support doctors use of social media at your hospital Do you have your own guidelines I d love to hear from you Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for the Lifespan health system in Rhode Island managing social media for five hospitals and a women s medicine practice Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/02/17/set_rules_for_doctors_on_social_media (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Docs absent from social media, for good reason
    healthcare advice According to an Information Week story patients are increasingly sharing information about their illnesses through social media and their need for emotional support is an opportunity for clinicians The story is based on a new report from Russell Herder which used social monitoring to look at how people use Twitter Facebook online message boards and blogs to obtain and share healthcare information The researchers were able to do this because some Facebook users don t apply privacy settings And herein lies a key to why doctors are uncomfortable in the social media world and why caution is absolutely needed First and foremost health information is protected by federal regulations If an individual chooses to disclose his or her health information online that is their decision Doctors however need to be extremely careful about violating patient privacy Basically it s a they can talk about it but we can t philosophy Then there is the liability involved with providing anything that might be construed as dispensing medical advice through social media tools Another concern is the time involved with social media use Doctors are already stretched thin enough taking care of patients managing a practice overseeing staff and filing necessary paperwork On top of that we re facing a shortage of physicians especially in the area of primary care Should we really be asking doctors to take away time from caring for patients in order to offer advice and emotional support to people online Do we want to be sitting in a doctor s office waiting for an appointment because the doctor is busy on Facebook I know that social media is a wonderful and practical tool for many things in the healthcare industry I agree that providing important timely pertinent health information to people through websites virtual support groups blogs tweets and Facebook posts can be invaluable in terms of getting information out there building brand awareness and allowing people to connect with others who are experiencing the same thing At the same time I don t believe that it s an outlet for a doctor to provide emotional support or offer medical advice The ramifications are just too great What do you think Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for Lifespan She is a communications and media relations specialist focused on national media relations for research at Rhode Island Hospital and its Hasbro Children s Hospital and managing social media for the hospitals within the Lifespan health system 5 comments Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2011/07/21/docs_absent_from_social_media_for_good_r (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - What job candidates can teach healthcare communicators
    either one time posts on a breaking news item or a regular column on timely topics Either way by selecting well respected and well read sites think KevinMD Women s Health or Psychology Today you re positioning your expert among a whole new segment in the population Be sure to include links to your social sites so these new readers in turn can connect with you there What s on your calendar Hopefully you ve got a calendar for social media similar to an editorial calendar that will guide your content through the year at least on a general basis But is that working for you How are you developing that calendar are you building it in a silo or as part of a team looking at the larger objectives and mission within the organization Does the calendar include posts that will build engagement and trust for your brand or is it only a placeholder to support tactics in the marketing plan It s a new year and it s time to evaluate your calendar and its content That brings me to another topic I didn t discuss with the candidate but something that needs to be addressed on a regular basis Analytics That dreaded word But the fact is if you re not looking at how your social media efforts are working then they are probably not worth doing We all know resources are short especially financial ones but the back end analytics on many of the more popular social media sites like Google Facebook Pinterest and Twitter are all free As a side note if you set up a Twitter advertising account you will then have access to the analytics for your account On Pinterest as long as you verify your website you also will have access to the analytics These give you a snapshot of what is and isn t working in your social media plan You also can dig as deeply as you d like in many of them I ve found Tweet Reach for Twitter accounts campaigns and hashtags For Pinterest you can check out one of my favorites Tailwind formerly PinReach If you do have a budget for it then you ve got even more choices The fact is though you can still analyze what you re doing at a basic level for free you want to be sure you re moving in the right direction and not wasting your time in the social world Those are three things we should all be looking at as we start the new yea but there are plenty more What are you reevaluating this year in terms of your social media plan Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for the Lifespan health system in Rhode Island managing social media for five hospitals and a women s medicine practice Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/01/07/title_118 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Tweet chats can be good for your hospital brand
    your tweets Afterward we gather all the tweets in a sort of transcript using Storify and share it through Twitter Facebook Google and our website for people who might have missed the chat but still have an interest When we planned the chats we thought it would be easier on our experts if we posted the tweets for them so they could talk and we would type We thought this would be more appealing to clinical staff who might not be familiar with Twitter but who still were willing to participate in a chat But we ve realized this approach was all wrong We found it doesn t look like a chat it just looked like a lot of tweets from the hospital How can your hospital improve its brands with tweet chats Use more experts I came across this helpful video from the MayoClinic The video explained how to do a tweet chat and do it well It also pointed out something we were missing getting other experts from well known organizations to participate in the chat Experts commenting on their own Twitter accounts will result in a truer discussion It also will align your hospital s experts with others who are well known in the field and encourage more participation from others on Twitter Finally by having other organizations involved you will have the advantage of additional promotion of the chat from those organizations to reach new audiences It s not a bad idea to have a journalist or two participate in the chat as well Here s an example of a wonderful chat about empowering patients that brought together experts and journalists from a number of organizations and media outlets The chat got great participation and was featured in this U S News story Here s another example of tweet chat promotion by Children s Hospital of Philadelphia which also issued a press release Last month the American Hospital Association also held a chat on patient engagement Create structure The video also taught me that our hospitals need more structure in the tweet chats While we developed questions in advance to serve as a guide we weren t using specific identified topics Instead we were just asking questions and the expert was answering From now on we will be identifying topics by including T1 T2 etc in our chats This best practice will allow people to follow along more easily and tweet responses to certain topics We hope that by incorporating these changes into our upcoming chats they will be more successful in terms of participation and engagement And if we can get a story out of it in the media then that s a bonus Are you using tweet chats to share important information and increase brand awareness What has worked for you What will you do differently in the future Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for the Lifespan health system in Rhode Island managing social media for five hospitals and a

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/10/09/tweet_chats_can_be_good_for_your_hospita (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Why hospitals should care about the social media soapbox
    I m glad dad was there and received the care he did and is now home The doctors and staff were wonderful but some things just didn t go as smoothly as I would have liked Being an employee I knew who to call to talk about it But if I wasn t I probably would have taken to social media to make a comment or two Then I thought of the many patients and their family members who find themselves in a hospital each year According to CDC statistics more than 35 million people are hospitalized every year The stats here show about 54 percent of people are on social networks That means almost 19 million of those people are using social media How many of those 19 million people do you suppose would know who to contact in a hospital if they weren t happy about their care In this day and age the chances that a disgruntled and unhappy patient will take to social media to vent and be heard are pretty good We know people want to voice their opinions especially when it comes to their health and what they see as bad care Think about the bad advertising that can result from those posts Think about the potential reach of those social postings It s no wonder people hop on their social media soapboxes to complain when they re not happy with their hospital care Now let s remember this Out of a total of 5 724 hospitals in the United States only 1 501 use some form of social media That s only about 26 percent of hospitals There s an interesting infographic here on how hospitals are using social media these days and of course there s the big list of hospitals on the Mayo Clinic Social Media Health Network Those negative comments can certainly impact your hospital s reputation and brand image After all word of mouth advertising is very strong When it comes from friends or family it s even stronger The 26 percent of hospitals using social media might catch those negative posts and complaints and then be able to respond and do something to reverse potential damage to their brands If they re not on social media at all there s no chance of responding Let s just hope the post photo or video doesn t go viral When you think of it in these terms it s easy to see why hospitals must consider being part of today s social networks How do you deal with unhappy patients on your social networks Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for the Lifespan health system in Rhode Island managing social media for five hospitals and a women s medicine practice Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/08/14/why_hospitals_care_social_media_soapbox (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    trucks media calls reporters wanting answers to a myriad of questions assignment desks calling for constant updates on patients requests for interviews and the list goes on and on Then of course there s the need to keep the public informed and that s when each hospital s social media efforts came into play Read more Leave a comment Hospital marketers beware of Pinterest changes April 10th 2013 by Nancy Cawley Jean This marks my third post about Pinterest In my first post I just wasn t seeing the value In my post last month I was gushing with accolades for Pinterest Well talk about things changing quickly in the social media world With this post I m going in the opposite direction Here s why Recently Pinterest announced it was changing its design and functionality Users were given the opportunity to preview the new look so I did Here s how Pinterest is describing the changes Sounds Pintastic doesn t it That s what I thought too Read more Leave a comment Pinning for success why hospitals need Pinterest March 14th 2013 by Nancy Cawley Jean Just over a year ago I wrote a post about Pinterest I presented some stats accolades and examples of how it was being used At the time I wasn t a big fan and I didn t really see the value of it for hospital marketing In that post I wrote Now granted I m a newbie at this whole pinning thing But first impressions for me are lasting ones With that said I m really not seeing the kind of interaction with others that you can have with Twitter and Facebook There doesn t seem to be any way to really connect with someone or have a conversation A year later I have to admit I m hooked I am completely utterly addicted to this little network of pins and pictures and recipes and fitness tips and motivational pictures Why Because it s so easy to use and share GREAT information that supports your mission Read more Leave a comment Turn bad weather into healthcare social media success February 13th 2013 by Nancy Cawley Jean The recent Blizzard of 2013 was an eye opener especially for people who didn t remember the Blizzard of 78 The difference between then and now Better weather forecasts and social media Social media is changing the way hospitals can communicate with the public Even during a power outage people turn to their smartphones for information So when meteorologists predicted Winter Storm Nemo for our area I felt the hospital accounts I manage should be a source of all kinds of storm related information When blizzard watches became actual warnings it was time to develop a storm content calendar for communicating with our social communities With the storm predicted to last about 24 hours it was important to stay up to date on the latest news to share the most important and helpful information with our friends

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=nancy%20jean&page=1&disp=posts&paged=3 (2016-02-10)
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