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  • Hospital Impact - Embrace the social side of customer service
    their concern and provide the phone number Owning up to the problem can go a long way in helping change an individual s opinion of your hospital O ffer assistance When someone tweets I m late for my appointment because I can t find a parking place tweet back and offer to call the office for them to explain why they re late and send them a link to a map of the campus to help them with parking If someone says I m lost in the hospital tweet back quickly with a Can I help you find something The appreciation you receive will go far in building brand loyalty C ommunicate regularly with your patient liaison Be sure you have a system in place to relay complaints so they can be addressed in a timely manner What happens on a weekend when you receive a complaint is there someone available who can address it Social is 24 7 it doesn t take time off for weekends and neither should you I nvestigate complaints working with your patient liaison Make them aware of any and all complaints you come across in your social networks We recently had a patient who posted a Facebook status update in great detail about her condition and what she felt was less than adequate care The post was sent to the patient liaison who immediately called the clinical manager on the unit to go and speak with the woman to see how her stay could be made better and address her concerns Having a system in place and an ongoing relationship with your patient liaison is crucial for effective customer service The patient liaison must be on board with your social media efforts and understand the power and importance of social media in the customer service role A sk questions When someone complains about your hospital feel free to ask them what we could have done differently for them to make their experience a more positive one For a tweet that says This hospital is the worst respond directly I m sorry to hear that how could we have made it better for you Don t be defensive and let them know that their opinion is important and that you re listening L earn from your experiences and from others Remember what has worked and what hasn t and change your approach accordingly And it s also important to read trade blogs to stay up to date with all the changes going on It s equally important to connect with other hospitals Follow other hospitals to see what they re doing and how they re addressing their own customer service issues Reach out to them and establish a relationship We re a friendly bunch of people and most of us are always willing to listen share and offer thoughts And that s how being SOCIAL can help you enhance your customer service efforts What are you doing in the customer service arena through social networks

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/11/13/embrace_the_social_side_of_customer_serv (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Leading hospitals still struggle with social media engagement
    promote it via social media advertising Facebook ads don t drive engagement It s not enough to only drive people to your Facebook page Compelling content will make them want to come back and hopefully like your page This is important because when a person likes your Facebook page the content is posted on his or her news feed which is where most people receive content Are you having a one sided conversation on social media Hospitals have a long history of handling potential crises and controlling the message This has resulted in hospitals using social media as a marketing tool to promote their service lines and programs If all your hospital is doing is sending out health tips talking about your services and linking back to your website your content can become stale especially if you don t have a blog or don t create original content on a regular basis A good social media rule of thumb is that you should also link to other websites and respond to comments to show that you re listening Are you creating engaging content or infomercials The good news is hospitals have embraced YouTube as a way to tell their story Social media is full of examples of compelling video content think of Medline s Pink Glove Dance that got hospitals across the country dancing However the Internet also is filled with videos of doctors sitting at desks and talking about the latest medical procedure While informative these videos can be deadly boring On the other side of the spectrum hospitals are creating expensive brand videos that tend to be overproduced and too long for the average YouTube viewer Better to create short two to three minute videos that are newsy and fast paced and don t look like advertisements Are you listening or doing all the talking Korneluk s infographic shows that lack of response on social media channels continues to be one of the biggest complaints people have about hospital social media efforts Why It s because most hospitals see social media as a broadcasting tool or may not have the budget for a community manager However someone should be checking the different social media channels at least once a day and making sure the hospital is addressing any questions concerns that are posted Consider a content engagement strategy If you don t have the resources to have someone serve as a community manager you may want to target your effort toward social media channels where people can engage with your content Social media channels like Pinterest and YouTube don t have the same real time urgency or require you to to post regular witty comments Granted it s important to continue to post new content but it doesn t need to happen on a daily basis Bennett is right We live in a different world than in 2009 where hospitals executives understand social media is important to their marketing mix However we have a long way to go

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/10/03/title_68 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Social media strategies for risk-averse hospitals
    social media i e retweeting or posting comments on Facebook and serve as a sounding board for your organization s social media messages and initiatives Consider cost Typically social media advisory board positions aren t paid However it s important to note that you will need to invest a lot of time and resources to identify and interview possible board members In addition you will need to spend time to educate them about your organization and initiatives as well as nurture your relationship with them and communicate with them on a regular basis The key is to keep your advisory board engaged so that they re up to speed on what s happening with your organization Make better use of video Many hospitals are hesitant to engage in social media because they re afraid of negative comments and feedback That s why a video strategy makes so much sense Of the social media channels video provides organizations with the most control because you re publishing your own information And if you re nervous about what people are going to say you can disable the comment feature on videos Consider cost You don t need to spend 20 000 on a brand video for it to be effective In fact that may be overkill The goal is not to create an overproduced ad but a clean crisp video that is compelling Ideally you should be able to shoot the video in house but sometimes this can result in shaky video or audio issues Instead you may want to hire a local video crew and have them shoot and edit the video for you This should cost around 5 000 and will give you a professional video you can be proud of Keep it short Effective YouTube videos are between one to three minutes long If you have a lot of great video content consider editing it into shorter videos This will allow people to find the segment they want rather than watching a five minute video Remember SEO It s not enough to create a great video and post it You need to take the time to use SEO search engine optimization to promote your video so people will see it Ensure all video titles include your hospital s name and descriptions and are tagged with keywords Promote your video Everyone s familiar with Facebook advertising But YouTube also offers options for promoting your video Purna Virji wrote a great post that outlines how you can boost conversions from your YouTube ads Play with Pinterest Serving as a virtual bulletin board or scrapbook Pinterest provides another platform to showcase the work your hospital is doing You can create different boards to pin or share information and videos about your hospital as long as they have a graphic image Even though it s tempting don t just post links to your hospital s website and YouTube videos Instead embrace the spirit of social media and link to relevant information that appears on

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/08/22/social_media_strategies_for_risk_averse (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Hospital social media: Less may be more
    can have too many friends On Facebook it can become a numbers game with the focus being on acquiring friends and fans rather than focusing on engagement The bigger question is If people only come to your page once or twice and don t make comments or click on your links are they really your friends The same holds true for personal Facebook pages Take a look at your Facebook friends and you may find that you re sharing personal stories with a bunch of people you don t know There was even a study showing that having 354 Facebook friends seemed to be the tipping point after which people were increasingly less happy with their lives Who knew It s better to be good at a few things vs being a master of none The same holds true with social media Organizations often feel that they need to bite off the whole enchilada when it comes to social media i e maintain a blog Facebook page s Twitter account mobile app Pinterest account YouTube channel etc Unfortunately many organizations don t have the staff to populate and maintain multiple social media channels Instead they re better off concentrating on one or two key networks and really owning them You can post too many times a day Back in the day RUN D M C sang You talk too much and you never shut up Well the same thing can happen with social media Organizations often believe posting is the key to engagement However the reverse may be true Many organizations post updates 10 15 even 20 times a week but in the end those posts can wind up being a lot of noise A good rule of thumb is to post a couple of times a day five days a week And if you don t have anything important to say don t say anything at all Why create when you can recycle Organizations struggle with creating content often resorting to posting health facts and health tips and sounding like every other hospital and health system Instead they should look for ways to reuse content they ve already created For example they can take excerpts of articles written by staff members to write blog posts create tweets etc Or if they ve developed a brand video they can edit it to make shorter video clips which can be posted on their website and YouTube as well as sent out via social media channels People may not want to watch a 5 minute video but they d be happy to watch a short video clip about a specific topic Take a critical look at your social media efforts You ll be surprised that you can use social media to work smarter not harder Jenn Riggle is a vice president at Weber Shandwick Worldwide and member of itshealthcare practice Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/06/06/hospital_social_media_less_may_be_more (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Reclaim your healthcare social media voice
    you were presenting to a room of social media experts Keep this in mind as you start writing Have a goal and stick with it Decide whether you re trying to educate people elicit an emotional response call people to action or change the way people think This will help you establish tone and will serve as a roadmap for your writing Don t bite off more than you can chew Not only is this good table manners it s also a good rule of thumb for writing It can be tempting to be overly ambitious and want to cover too many topics in one blog The danger is that you can confuse your readers and lose your sense of direction Rather than writing a long and complicated piece consider splitting the blog into two or turning it into a series Put on your reporter hat Many healthcare PR and marketing pros have journalism backgrounds but somewhere along the line they made a move to the dark side Now s a good time to go back to your roots and think like a reporter Don t be afraid to be a little skeptical look beneath the surface and ask the tough questions Take a stand PR people may be masters of sticking to key messages and creating positioning statements but this can make for dull writing Instead write about a topic you re passionate about Don t be afraid to voice your opinion show your emotions or make a judgment call Think about Andy Rooney s commentaries on 60 Minutes sometimes it s okay to be a curmudgeon Don t hide behind big words and jargon Every industry has its own acronyms and lingo and healthcare is no exception We ve got the CDC PPACA HCAHPS and AMIs to just name a few No matter how tempting it is don t fall into the trap of using medical jargon or getting too technical Instead write as if you re talking to your next door neighbor Stick to short declarative sentences and avoid passive verbs like the plague Healthcare blogging can be a rewarding way to share ideas and hone your writing skills And it s nice to see your name in a byline again Jenn Riggle is an associate vice president and social media leader of the Health Practice at CRT tanaka She regularly engages in social media both on Twitter riggrl and frequently blogs about social media and healthcare issues for The Buzz Bin a PR and marketing blog Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/04/11/how_hospital_marketers_can_regain_their (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Should your hospital have an interest in Pinterest?
    this time there is NO category for health on Pinterest Jenn Riggle riggrl also wrote a blog post earlier this month for Hospital Impact encouraging healthcare communicators to begin thinking visually and cited some of the many uses of Pinterest for hospitals She points out that only a handful of hospitals are currently using Pinterest so it s a great opportunity to differentiate yourself in the market by using this visual tool Some uses she identifies include boards for exercise recipes patient stories and more Baylor Health is now fully involved in Pinterest and is focusing much of its social media efforts on the new tool Here s great post about what it s doing It s pretty amazing you should check it out I also came across this from Nicola Ziady nicolaziady a collection of boards from hospitals that are currently on Pinterest I m sure this list will grow rapidly So now that we have a better understanding of this new tool we can see the many possibilities the virtual pinboard represents for hospital communicators as we continue to find new ways to market our brands engage with our communities and build loyal followings I m going to play the devil s advocate on this one though Yes Pinterest is the newest hottest social network out there Yes it s growing rapidly Yes it s a key audience for healthcare communicators in that mostly women are addicted to this new tool That is all well and good Now granted I m a newbie at this whole pinning thing But first impressions for me are lasting ones With that said I m really not seeing the kind of interaction with others that you can have with Twitter and Facebook There doesn t seem to be any way to really connect with someone or have a conversation I m also assuming that most hospitals have a limited amount of resources to manage and monitor social networks I believe those resources should be dedicated to those networks that are going to give you the most engagement the most connections with people and the most logical way to support your overall mission on health and healthcare I also came across some privacy issues for using Pinterest As it s still growing the social network will no doubt be tweaked along the way and I m sure these privacy issues will be addressed So yes Pinterest is the new kid in town and it s really cool and everyone s using it But it seems to be a more solitary activity than one of engagement For now I m going to keep watching and pinning on my personal boards We ll see where this goes before we think about adding it to our own bag of social media tricks What about your hospital Are you pinning or do you have plans to start Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for Lifespan She is a communications and media relations specialist focused

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/02/20/should_your_hospital_have_an_interest_in (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    is a saturated market There are only 24 hours in a day and people simply don t have any more time to devote to social media In fact people already spend more time using social media than going to church talking on the phone sending email or exercising The good and maybe bad news is that people are looking in the mirror and admitting they re addicted to social media That s why they re vowing to unplug during the holidays and making a social media naughty and nice list determining what social media adds value and what doesn t There s even new technology like Bottlenose that may help make this process easier Read more Leave a comment Can mobile apps boost patient satisfaction October 19th 2011 by Jenn Riggle Can mobile apps improve Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems HCAHPS satisfaction scores Maybe Hospitals are focused on reducing hospital readmission rates and improving customer service and mobile apps have the potential to make this happen The Journal of Nursing Care Quality reported that 62 percent of medication discrepancies were discovered when nurses conducted either a post discharge follow up call or home visit In addition a study conducted by The Beryl Companies showed that post discharge calls not only improve patient satisfaction but also HCAHPS scores Read more Leave a comment FDA lacks bandwidth to evaluate mobile health apps August 17th 2011 by Jenn Riggle Mobile medical apps promise to help people manage chronic diseases by putting information in people s hands The question is Will progress be hampered by the Food and Drug Administration FDA getting into the act If FDA guidance in the pharma industry about social media usage is any indication of what could happen in mobile health mHealth we should all be concerned Read more Leave a comment Are mobile apps really valuable to providers patients July 6th 2011 by Jenn Riggle It seems like every week a hospital proudly unveils a new mobile app But before you go and hire a mobile developer ask yourself Will a mobile app provide real value to users and will it advance your hospital s marketing and or clinical objectives It s not enough to simply build a mobile app people need to use it It s important to keep in mind that while there are thousands of iPhone apps currently available only 5 percent are still used one month after downloading Will your hospital s app provide enough useful information so that it will be one that people return to on a regular basis Read more 15 comments Previous Page Next Page Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=jenn%20riggle&page=1&disp=posts&paged=5 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Why we need patient experience leaders in healthcare
    organizations I have found where there is a leader there is clear focus defined strategy and expanded levels of commitment Patient experience leaders are not a nice to have but a must have in today s healthcare setting With that if there is a commitment to having dedicated leaders there should be an equal commitment to ensuring these leaders have the knowledge and skills to effectively execute in their roles To that end a group of volunteer healthcare professionals supported by The Beryl Institute worked to frame a Patient Experience Body of Knowledge defining 14 domains of knowledge key to patient experience leaders Input was gathered from more than 100 healthcare leaders from four countries in shaping the model Domains cover a range of topics from understanding the history of service excellence and patient experience in healthcare to core management skills to the key processes and tools available to leaders in improving patient experience As equally important to the framework itself is that it reflects the voices of all those that touch healthcare around the globe including patients families community members caregivers and healthcare leaders alike To this end a global open comment period was launched this week to gather additional feedback and expand the dialogue on the critical importance of patient experience AND the leaders who are accountable for its success I encourage you to share your voice in the process I know some will argue that a leader alone does not drive outcomes with that I will not argue but rather ask if you leave it up to everyone how will it get done The patient experience has garnered a lot of attention of late due to new measurements and policies being implemented in countries around the world These changes have real business implications for the healthcare system as a whole But at the end of the day patient experience is about more than that It is about our patients and their support networks the communities we serve the caregivers that bring passion to this work every day It is not the nice thing to do it is the right thing to do And how do we do it I challenge you to engage your organization in ensuring you have a committed role to lead your patient experience effort It is a worthwhile and important investment I also encourage you to contribute to the ongoing dialogue on patient experience leadership We all have a role to play In the end this is about one thing ensuring the highest quality service experiences possible We owe it to our patients and ourselves Jason A Wolf Ph D is executive director of The Beryl Institute the premier thoughtleader on improving the patient experience He is a recognized expert on organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Follow Jason jasonawolf and The Beryl Institute berylinstitute on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/03/08/why_we_need_patient_experience_leaders_i (2016-02-10)
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