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  • Hospital Impact - How to maintain a path to patient experience excellence
    Institute community member who is working on determining the performance challenges around patient experience This individual s organization is well respected highly regarded cited and modeled for its patient experience efforts I know many others who aspire to achieve what it has striving to mimic or replicate its efforts What I do not see is the recognition of the humble nature with which this organization admits it has much farther to go and how it remains relentless in its unending pursuit of excellence I don t want to diminish the power of shared and proven practice only dilute the myth that these ideas are a panacea to achieving performance nirvana Rather it is the focus of organizations on a state of continuous improvement that may be the simplest yet most powerful characteristic of high performance So what can organizations do to maintain a path to patient experience and high performance overall I offer a few suggestions Be clear about where you want to go This is not only an organizational vision and mission but clarity on your true intention as an organization what you hope to accomplish and impact as a result of your actions Ensure your people at all levels understand not only where you are headed but what you expect of them in behavior action and intent in all they do in every moment every day Reinforce your efforts with the right resources technology and solutions Donâ t be afraid to acknowledge your gaps and fill those with what you need to succeed Recognize all of this can and should change in a moment s notice if your situation requires it and be willing to move adapt or reconfigure as needed to continue your efforts to improve I have been fortunate to witness many healthcare organizations around the world working on this critical issue and have been asked by many more for the secret keys to success I do not intend to over simplify the response or discourage action by suggesting there is no one simple checklist to performance success Instead I offer one best practice that can lead to the outcomes you aspire to in healthcare Simply stated the best performers never believe they are truly there with there equating to achieving a state of high performance And the corollary those who tell you they have achieved the best are at risk of becoming complacent stagnant and in decline Top performing organizations know this all too well and tackle this reality with energy commitment and passion rather than frustration or concern This can only lead to the greatest things for all those impacted by healthcare systems around the world I encourage you to stay in motion and accept never getting there for you are truly on a noble road Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute where he specializes in organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Follow Jason jasonawolf and The Beryl Institute berylinstitute on Twitter Leave a comment Please

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/09/19/how_to_maintain_a_path_to_patient_experi (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Bringing humanity to the patient experience
    experience It may be something as simple are our language the words we choose to use dictated by systems beyond our walls years of policy and regulation teaching and accepted understanding I hope we can begin to challenge these conventions for the sake of our families our friends and the communities we serve I want to reinforce an important point gained from my conversations with patients and families directly That the burden of change does not rest solely in the hands of healthcare leaders but rather in the hands of all who engage in the system I saw this first hand just this week during a visit to the William Osler Health System in Toronto Canada where they unveiled a new vision and strategic plan co created by leadership staff and the community and shared a commitment to patient inspired healthcare without boundaries It is our human nature to search for and play a role We have job titles and defined responsibilities and we most often actually want these So too then in the care experience we play the role of doctor nurse patient or family member Yet at the end of the day while expertise distinguishes our ability and our role it does not differentiate our humanness It is here where language may play the biggest part A champion for the patient experience movement and dear mentor Wendy Leebov reinforces that language can make the biggest impact in our care experience Patients thrive on positive and clear communication and they are affected by the behaviors of all they encounter Yet it is the language of the system itself that we must challenge Healthcare providers are mothers and fathers they too are patients themselves Patients are not only passive individuals facing situations of pain or needing relief from suffering Rather patients are most often individuals who want to actively engage understand and work towards getting better I would rather see the language of healthcare consist of healing partnerships than transactional outcomes I offer this in recognition that we will still need expertise As a husband who had a recent situation where my wife was taken suddenly to the emergency room while I was elsewhere with our son I counted on the experts to play their role This will never be diminished I only suggest that as we work to ensure the best of patient experiences for all we must demystify the nature of our healthcare environment simplify our language and recognize that we all caregivers or recipients of care have a role to play in an effective and positive healthcare encounter I challenge each of us to consider a shift in our language â It may not be easy but it will be well worth it Jason A Wolf Ph D is president of The Beryl Institute where he specializes in organizational effectiveness service excellence and high performance in healthcare Follow Jason jasonawolf and The Beryl Institute berylinstitute on Twitter Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/06/20/bringing_humanity_to_the_patient_experie (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    greater traction as leaders now have the air cover needed to address patient experience as the right thing to do in a way they may not have been able to before From those words in fall of 2011 I have seen unparalleled energy focused on the improvement of patient experience in all corners of the globe Read more Leave a comment A call to action in improving patient experience March 27th 2013 by Jason A Wolf As I look at data from recent research and hear first hand the challenges faced by many healthcare organizations I have discovered that with all the talk about improving patient experience there is still a gap in action on many fronts I share this not to diminish the incredibly thoughtful and comprehensive efforts taking place or the positive impact organizations are having daily Rather my hope is to challenge those on the edges of this issue looking in There is no time to wait the time for action is now The opportunity for action is evident in recent research on actions pertaining to the patient experience For example in our recent study The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals while healthcare leaders identified patient experience as a top priority only 58 percent of all healthcare organizations reported having a formal mandate to address patient experience Read more Leave a comment We all must lead to improve patient experience February 20th 2013 by Jason A Wolf Some fundamental ideas have been shared about efforts to impact and improve the patient experience many right here at Hospital Impact We have seen the conversation range from the bottom line impact of making the right choices to the power of compassion in influencing patient and family encounters to the importance of engaging and recognizing staff One thing that has been implicit in all these discussions embedded in much of the research and apparent in my travels to healthcare organizations is that the engagement focus and commitment of leadership is central to patient experience success In recent research conducted at The Beryl Institute we asked U S healthcare leaders what they saw as the drivers for patient experience success The top response noted by more than 72 percent of participants was strong visible support from the top Read more Leave a comment Quality trumps size in patient experience January 23rd 2013 by Jason A Wolf This week began with Inauguration Day Regardless of political philosophy or preference it is one of the most powerful examples of democracy at work with its symbolic representation of the freedom of choice It also was marked by the Martin Luther King Jr holiday which has deep meaning for so many and reminds us all of the responsibilities we have for one another These powerful examples of choice and of caring also are rooted in the hearts of those in healthcare and guide the actions we take when addressing the healthcare experience for patients families and peers In previous blog posts I have

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=Jason%20A.%20Wolfe&page=1&disp=posts&paged=7 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Finding the pony in healthcare
    Ed Meese who served as President Reagan s attorney general from 1985 to 1988 whenever something would go wrong somebody on the staff often said There must be a pony in here somewhere As I wrote in Collaborative Change a surgeon with whom I worked commented Only a baby desires change And Paul Batalden professor of Pediatrics at Dartmouth and an IHI Senior Fellow once counseled Change feels like failure when we are in the middle of it The choice is ours as to whether we embrace the present opportunity to transform healthcare or have change forced upon us by people who do not share our beliefs in the sacredness of our individual relationships with patients and their families We need to cultivate a spirit of inquiry rather than advocacy depersonalize our differences and dig to find the pony amidst the manure Ken is a practicing general surgeon MBA and CEO of HealthcareCollaboration com who divides his time between providing general surgical coverage and working with organizations that want to engage physicians to improve clinical and financial performance Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds failed to act on earlier outbreak 8

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/06/26/finding_the_pony_in_healthcare (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Process improvement: Strive to do better than your best
    for permission prior to trying something new She stated that things were quite different in the IT world People recognizing situations in which improvements were needed took the initiative to try to make changes and then inform their bosses about the results of those experiments There was a culture of ongoing improvement that included and in fact relied on the idea that for many of our problems we must discover solutions that work for us Our organizations and communities need a learning approach to improvement We may learn that someone else s best practice is exactly what we need and then enthusiastically go about implementing it We may find that we can enhance that practice as improvements are discovered that the originators hadn t found Maybe those improvements are intimately intertwined in the relationships processes and culture of our particular organization community In that case the improvement works for us and won t work for others For this reason we may learn that what was a best practice for someone else actually isn t useful for us because the superior results were intimately intertwined with someone else s relationships processes culture and are not transferable to ours We may actually discover superior results that work for us already exist our internal best practices our positive deviants whose practices our organization community will embrace once they can discover them from their peers And finally we may find we have to create our own solutions through an iterative process of innovation experimentation and continuous learning There is a clear link with all of this and how healthcare leadership occurs A focus on imported best practices is consistent with a traditional hierarchical leadership model as solutions flow down into the organization from above leaders providing both the vision of what needs to happen and how to do it An improvement approach based on learning requires what Mary Uhl Bien Ph D calls complexity leadership Formal leaders create the conditions for the emergent learning necessary so those who own the work can make decisions most useful for them They provide a general vision and acknowledge there is no clear path for getting there enabling and supporting the multiple possible hows that may work in local contexts For me organizations embracing this approach to improvement have the potential to go beyond best practices and become truly best Jeffrey Cohn M D served as a prior chief quality officer for the Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia He is the President of Plexus Institute a nonprofit focused on improving healthcare outcomes through the use of adaptive improvement methods Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/06/19/making_best_in_healthcare_even_better (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - A tribute to a person in the integrated care arena
    urgency for change and can be a bridge to trust for physicians with long memories of perceived injustices Transparency stimulates healthy competition and can be a remedy for the oft heard lamentation that working with physicians is like herding cats Celebrating champions helps hospital leaders leverage peer pressure to improve communication and collaboration Champions are people who have won the respect of their colleagues for delivering outstanding care They identify with their community and are willing to leverage their credibility to improve clinical and financial outcomes Rounding for safety was one of the ways that leaders at Sentara developed a culture of safety in all hospitals in its system Meanwhile phone calls to patients proved to be the step that allowed Waterbury Hospital to decrease readmissions due to medication compliance issues As Dr Cusano said Communication was the problem and also the solution Ms Manas concluded with the imperative to improve the care that we provide Our patients deserve no less It can be challenging for healthcare professionals to admit that despite their best efforts that they still have glitches in care delivery that cause unnecessary suffering As Theodore Roosevelt said more than 100 years ago The credit belongs to the man actually in the arena whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood who strives valiantly who errs and comes up short again and again because there is no effort without error or shortcoming Ken is a practicing general surgeon MBA and CEO of HealthcareCollaboration com who divides his time between providing general surgical coverage and working with organizations that want to engage physicians to improve clinical and financial performance Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/05/29/title_103 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Integrated care: The bridge between quality and efficiency
    the bridge between quality and efficiency for improved care integration include Fostering formal channels of communication with area nursing homes and home health agencies Working with care coordinators and patient navigators to provide seamless transitions of care for patients as they move through the care continuum Developing closer relationships with area hospitals Creating an in house call center to ease patient transfers from other facilities EMR donation agreements with several physician groups Implementation of an electronic medical record system Aligning physicians with overall strategic direction through leadership on clinical councils and through medical directorships Focusing on achievement of top decile performance in quality and safety through Transparency of information Specific goal setting across every level of the health system Service champions in each department Daily safety calls meetings with senior leaders Leader rounding for safety Top 10 Safety List Weekly safety messages to all colleagues employees Departmental huddles at the change of shift Hourly rounding in clinical areas Discharge phone calls Supporting Lean projects throughout the organization Forming Centers of Excellence to centralize clinical and administrative resources align physicians in quality improvement efforts identify greater efficiencies market differentiation and improve overall patient satisfaction It is imperative that we continue to find ways to improve the care we provide Integrating that care through the continuum with the help and support of our physician and community partners is key in reaching top decile performance Our patients deserve no less Julie Manas is president and CEO of the Western Wisconsin division of Hospital Sisters Health System in Eau Claire Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/05/06/integrated_care_the_bridge_between_quali (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - What nurses taught me about compassionate care
    learn from the nurses I also had the privilege of working with nurses from Texas to showcase the progress that they made despite limited resources to leverage strategic collaboration to improve care for their community increasing their pool of scarce operating room nurses and obtaining magnet status for nearby hospitals to recruit and retain qualified personnel When I was associate professor at Dartmouth nurses taught me that an important goal for a residency program in surgery is to teach communication skills Several of them also taught me When one door closes many others open We are socialized to value relationships We are hardwired to deal with change The aforementioned skills of building relationships active listening and embracing change are critical for surviving and thriving in this decade of healthcare transformation I am indebted to my nursing colleagues for making a difference every day not only for what they have taught me as a physician but also for the way that they have helped me as a cancer survivor Ken is a practicing general surgeon MBA and CEO of HealthcareCollaboration com who divides his time between providing general surgical coverage and working with organizations that want to engage physicians to improve clinical and financial performance Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/05/08/what_nurses_can_teach_docs_about_compass (2016-02-10)
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