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  • Hospital Impact - Even more firsthand symptoms of a broken healthcare system
    average and power last year Did you know Jimmy has taught me and many others much about heart courage and empathy Working in quality improvement I began to take a systems view of this healing encounter and again recognized that as leaders in healthcare we have great opportunity Great opportunity to adapt the system and better position physicians for these encounters so that care is optimized clinicians find joy in healing again and patients are safer and achieve better clinical outcomes How By ensuring we are all aware of the importance of empathy and emotional intelligence in healthcare relationships which according to studies not only saves time but also reduces patient anxiety improves clinical outcomes and by the way reduces malpractice claims Once aware embracing and prioritizing both empathy and emotional intelligence as critical to the success of the healthcare organization e g adapting the healthcare system to ensure hiring practices include measures of each training programs focused on each are supported patient experience and satisfaction surveys assess each and identifying and eliminating all barriers to full acceptance By adapting the healthcare system to provide more opportunity for authentic relationship and connection between physician and patient to establish trust so the patient s whole story can be told and heard By positioning all who work in healthcare to be mindful and present when evolving the healing encounter while working at the systemic perspective and level as well as during each and every healing encounter Mindfulness is key to the creation of high reliability organizations and improved patient safety Mindfulness and presence also increase the opportunity for authentic connection and sharing By creating a culture within healthcare organizations where all clinicians and staff have the opportunity to take ownership and accountability for identifying when the optimal healing environment does not exist and working to improve and change for the better Will Jimmy play professional baseball I have no idea What I do know is that if it is Jimmy s dream he will face each challenge with heart and courage and with the support of many will do his best learn from the experience and help others along the way I also know that as a healthcare leader I will continue to face the challenge of bringing mindfulness presence empathy and emotional intelligence into healthcare with hopefully the same heart and courage I have seen in Jimmy Dear Doctor Do you know Jimmy Do you know the measure of his heart Have you heard his whole story Were you present and mindful when meeting with Jimmy and his mother Did you practice with compassion Were you empathetic Do you understand the type of impact you could have made if you were Do you understand the potential impact you made because you weren t Did the system position you to do so Did the system let you down Are you willing to evolve adapt and improve the healing encounter If you are I am willing to travel the journey with you With

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/05/08/even_more_firsthand_symptoms_of_a_broken (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Heed patient, industry calls for compassionate care
    percent of patients want physicians to ask about spiritual beliefs and more than 60 percent believe information concerning their spiritual beliefs would improve the physicians ability to provide care as well as encourage realistic hope Even clinical experts agree In her article The role of spirituality in health care Christina M Puchalski M D highlighted that a group of experts convened by the Association of American Medical Colleges listed the following as the number one essential physician attribute Physicians must be compassionate and empathic in caring for patients In all of their interactions with patients they must seek to understand the meaning of the patients stories in the context of the patients beliefs and family and cultural values Clearly this did not happen for Mr Roberts in his interaction with his physician Though it did occur in his connection with Sally his chaplain Interestingly Puchalski also noted even The Joint Commission recognizes the importance of focusing beyond just clinical care in its policy standard For many patients pastoral care and other spiritual services are an integral part of health care and daily life The hospital is able to provide for pastoral care and other spiritual services for patients who request them Compassionate care is patient centered Compassionate care is desired by patients and thus improves the patient experience Compassionate care is recognized as important by those within the traditional healthcare sector e g AAMC and TJC Compassionate care is an inexpensive innovation in healing And compassionate care leads to better care and health outcomes Compassionate care has been shown to benefit patients with regard to protocol adherence wound healing patient satisfaction and well being Compassionate care has also been shown to benefit physicians e g lower depression rates elevated meaning less burnout and more diligent technical care Compassionate care benefits medical students with regard to diminished complaints of abusive clinical environments and maladaptive team interactions And it also benefits healthcare systems through improved reputational gains And yet compassionate care is often not set as an organizational value Nor is it the norm to identify compassionate care as a key strategy to improve health outcomes or to ensure efficient and effective care But much can be done As healthcare leaders we can recognize the importance of compassionate care and we can adapt We can identify the great work of those who are living the value of compassionate care throughout the system pastoral care services and others We can categorize the best practices of these individuals we can measure their impacts and we can learn We can honor the importance of this focus and we can integrate compassionate care into our workflows and into our hearts Mr Roberts story was diminished and he was too Let s adapt let s learn and let s grow from his story and agree to never ever allow another patient to feel as he did Thomas H Dahlborg M S M is chief financial officer and vice president of strategy for the National Initiative for Children

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/04/10/title_92 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    seats and again made note of the number of people gathered in mass for the same procedure Part of me said Great clearly this is the place to be They perform high volumes of this procedure and thus must have perfected the process This thought did not last long Read more Leave a comment Medical home s role in children s health still evolving January 15th 2013 by Thomas Dahlborg In a previous blog post I stressed that we must refocus the principles of patient centered medical homes PCMH to ensure compassionate care is elevated in the hierarchy of priorities if we are to truly position children to achieve their optimal health Since then two additional barriers to children s health have become all too familiar bullying and adolescent substance abuse and the link between the two For example in the online December issue of Pediatrics researchers from the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University found that 64 percent of those surveyed report getting bullied at school with the risk of bullying increasing relative to the child s body weight Read more Leave a comment Humanity The heart of patient experience success December 19th 2012 by Jason A Wolf As I look back at all that was written and shared during this past year on patient experience not only in my previous blog posts but in the words shared by so many patient experience leaders caregivers hospital administrators physicians patients and family members I was moved to find compelling powerful and even emotional themes As readers you were drawn to the stories shared about the experiences people had and it brought home an important point As much as we in healthcare strive to provide the best patient and family experience enact effective strategies and tactics and implement the required policies we must remember we are patients and family members ourselves In the talks I share and in visits to healthcare organizations I witness what I believe rests at the core of the healthcare experience we are human beings taking care of human beings Read more Leave a comment Love A measurable actionable solution to healthcare December 12th 2012 by Thomas Dahlborg Recently my family and I visited with my 94 year old grandmother Mémère She had been discharged from the hospital after a fall and was home recuperating During our visit we shared stories told jokes listened observed learned laughed and engaged We truly connected And interestingly not only did Mémère feel better during this time together but we all did too As we were leaving I kept thinking about how well we all felt and also wondered what magic was in play and how it could be applied to the healthcare system If we all felt this good all had such great experiences and no adverse outcomes we must be able to translate this to healthcare And eventually it came to me The secret to these wonderful outcomes was love Read more Leave a comment

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=Thomas%20Dahlborg&page=1&disp=posts&paged=7 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - The role of physician services in hospital transformation
    great deal about how different institutions dealt with their doctors Our research revealed how physicians were dinged for not completing their medical records how their system interfaces with the hospital rarely worked and how IT rarely fixed them and a pain point they mentioned often how the leadership did not visit or help them build their practices They also expressed concerns about nursing and patient care We could see this as a challenging starting point or an opportunity to bring about innovation and positive lasting change We chose the latter We determined we could quickly fix some very solvable problems and then tackle how to help physicians improve their practices and their relationships with the hospital During the information gathering process we learned something that seemed rather disturbing many physicians felt that Hurley really didn t want their patients citing poor complaint management inattentiveness to block scheduling and lack of awareness of and familiarity with programs specialists and services The mission we had to accomplish one that you might find necessary at your organization during these changing times Build effective and empathetic relationships with physicians in the region to facilitate increased referral streams of patients to the medical center I cannot emphasize enough that this was as much about how the physicians felt about the hospital as it was about what the hospital actually did to or for them We know that people buy with emotion and then justify their decisions with reason While we might change functional methods we need to focus on changing the emotional relationship between the hospital and the physicians Where to begin We knew that drivers of referrals would emerge if we Identified the root cause of issues and targeted our fix it conversations in a way that was emotionally grounded in improving how physicians felt about the hospital Aligned the entire organization to fix things right and fast no IT support was simply unacceptable This was paramount for the entire organization not just physician services Determined the real reasons for missed opportunities in the referral stream Tracked outreach and managed accountability ensuring that the staff delivered results not promises We first addressed the role of the physician services liaison In the past they defined their jobs in terms of windshield time nonappointment visits and service recovery focus Those were nice activities but neither results driven nor sufficient to shift physician behavior The calling officers had to transform their personal goals daily activities and styles to become needs based sales and service professionals New training enabled them to provide needs based solution selling appointments and relationship development actions value in innovative ways targeted conversations to under referring practices and fast track problem resolution Newly grounded in developing target audiences around data driven models with a strong business intelligence platform the team began calling physicians regularly getting calls from them to resolve issues and building trust a critical missing component of their relationships Of particular importance was the data model that would set a benchmark and

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/05/07/title_121 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Branding Hurley Medical Center: Take advantage of technology
    online experience is the first and often most important contact point for consumers searching for a healthcare need but in my initial years at Hurley this was new It was obvious we had to build an entirely new website not just patch up the old as well as create one for the new children s hospital it was launching The new architecture and functionality were extremely user friendly and created the overall impact of an up and coming healthcare institution Hurley was no longer a lower tier safety net that you might never need Rather it was a sharp up to date and approachable hospital that cared about the community We then added new content to keep the site optimized for search and functional for the staff You can check it out at www hurleymc com Hurley recently launched a new website to adapt to mobile devices and the evolution of the hospital itself with strong design and a powerful story to reflect changes within the hospital With websites in place our own research on social media showed how some hospitals and medical centers in particular children s hospitals had really caught on to social media and were building huge fan clubs of likes Other hospitals ignored the whole idea Fortunately Hurley had someone in marketing who intuitively understood that social media was all about storytelling and that there was no better place than Facebook to start telling Hurley stories She was also passionate about the medical center s focus on children Together we initiated the social platforms and she started to have conversations with the community such as storytelling contests around Mother s and Father s Days and celebrations of Hurley firsts or those children s stories that resonate so well with everyone But the key that made our marketing efforts successful was the content marketing strategy was simple and straightforward It allowed the community s deeply held affection for Hurley to shine through along with the hospital s equally affectionate bond with its patients As a result Hurley s Facebook community grew slowly at first but then exploded as a place to celebrate patients and their families new babies birthdays survivor anniversaries and even physicians with stories to share Today Hurley has almost 8 000 likes and more than 37 000 visitors on its Facebook page Its social media presence is vibrant exciting and reflects the energy of the institution What else emerged on the heels of all the likes The brand identity is recognized far and wide And little by little engaging the members of Hurley s community through social media became as important as caring for them when they needed medical care Now that was something to celebrate In our next blog post I ll take you through how we built the physician services program and why you might do so as well Andrea J Simon Ph D is a former Marketing Branding and Culture Change Senior VP at Hurley Medical Center in Flint Mich A

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/04/24/part_2_branding_hurley_medical_center_ta (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - What's the story? Branding Hurley Medical Center
    Angeles and New York born in Flint told us they were Hurley Babies Hurley also had an excellent trauma center that routinely saved lives often in extraordinary circumstances and against all odds From the consumer s point of view these reflected the powerful role that the medical center played in the life of the region in individual lives This was not about rebranding Hurley rather the brand had great value How could we capture that leverage the positive feelings and deep affection people had for the hospital and bring in more patients perhaps from an even broader geographic area Where to begin Being an anthropologist I used observational research and culture probes to listen to the stories people told us about each of the three hospitals the attending doctors and how they differed Doctors at Hurley were engaged in the process as were board members The doctors felt sure that all we had to do was to tell people Hurley had the best doctors Those who know choose Hurley said one doctor Just tell them said another The problem was that most people intrinsically knew they had little choice in where they went for care Unless my doctor is admitting there I can t go there Additionally we faced the challenge of stubborn office managers who told us that insured patients were sent to one hospital and the uninsured or Medicaid people were sent to Hurley Not much was going to change that they made sure we understood A powerhouse brand with strength depth and heart We had to leverage Hurley s strengths Could we transform Hurley into a powerful highly influential brand that could turn consumer beliefs and physician habits into credible reasons to choose Hurley Moreover the marketing focus had to shift to the younger adults in the community who were not as routinized or resistant to change and make them loyal users as they grew older and needed care as well Quite a challenge Children and families were the way in The power of Pediatrics NICU and the emergency department and trauma units opened up the potential to capitalize on the deep affection the local community had for Hurley Zeroing in on children as a marketing segment we soon found there were no shortages of stories about how Hurley had saved children s lives Whether it was the little boy whose father s lawn mower severed his foot or the very premature baby who survived and thrived because of the NICU or the dozens of adolescents who were screened to identify heart conditions before they became life threatening Hurley was indeed touching lives through better medicine What became clear was a big brand story that indeed just had to be told The advertising captured the essential power of the hospital through the voices of the children and their parents and the nurses and doctors who together transformed their lives What s next What happened next This presented a social media opportunity to tell the brand story When

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/03/25/what_s_the_story_branding_hurley_medical (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - 3 steps to make a hospital name change stick
    considering a name change What are you trying to really achieve Better consolidation of services Simpler branding and marketing messaging Better physician recruitment A highly respected hospital in the Northeast recently did an excellent job renaming and rebranding itself which it did for sound strategic reasons not only to refresh the logo After several years of trying to market many separate hospitals that were all part of one health system they realized the value the brand of the entire system was being diluted by each hospital having its own name Physicians who originally had been adverse to changing the name of their hospital now became advocates for creating a more powerful name and unified brand once they understood the strategic reasoning That shift in their thinking was critically important to the successful transformation of the system Subsequently all levels from nurses to support staff were ready to support and promote the new name 3 What is the execution plan The power of a name change is all in the execution And what makes the execution stick is engagement The new name will come alive in people s brains if they have a stake in how it is rolled out and if the name is telegraphed to the public lived within the hospital and communicated at every touch point You must make your staff your brand ambassadors because in a way they already are Who are they telling about this wonderful place where they work and what are they saying about it One other very important point is to recognize and honor the legacy of the old name even while you re transferring that history to the new People may mourn the loss of a name they believed in and thought well of in the past But if you are proactive in your reasons for changing and explain how you are building meaning into the new name they will more easily make the leap from the old to the new This huge wave of name changing has been occurring across the country for quite a while now and the trend is not going to slow down anytime soon So when considering a hospital name change approach the task with those three questions in mind One final piece of advice What s the difference between success and failure in the name change game Is it the degree to which you involve your community and get them to love the new name Perhaps it is to build more respect for the institution Really think through what you are trying to achieve and the naming process will become just one element in your overall brand and business strategy Don t forget to invite your staff to come along with you on the journey and I guarantee it will be a much smoother trip Andrea J Simon Ph D is a former Marketing Branding and Culture Change Senior VP at Hurley Medical Center in Flint Mich A corporate anthropologist she also is president and CEO

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2014/01/29/3_steps_to_make_a_hospital_name_change_s (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Don't lose your hospital brand when changing names
    for consumers to really believe this facility is now a destination no longer merely a transfer station to other hospitals with higher levels of care Consumer comprehension After 14 years trying to get people to use its name correctly BryanLGH is losing the name it adopted after a 1997 merger and is renaming itself Bryan Health The new name reflects the system s growth over the past 15 years Apparently the Nebraska health system could not get people to say the old name right so the new name comes along to lend a hand From a branding perspective here s hoping it also lends greater clarity and simplicity to the story Fresh start To help the hospital s branding and marketing hospital officials have been saying for months that the facility needs a fresh start and a new name with a regional focus to improve its viability and reputation Ever heard of putting lipstick on a pig Broader goals This new name embraces the spirit of our new networks of care which focus not just on hospitals but on the broader delivery of healthcare through our medical groups outpatient services and other healthcare programs Maybe as they added more items to the menu they thought changing the name of the diner would suffice Changing a name is not at all the same as rebranding Yes names are critically important But they only have impact if they mean something in the minds of the consumers you are trying to capture And mind share doesn t come along just because you refreshed your name or chucked it altogether and came up with a new one If anything you are in danger of creating confusion cynicism and commoditization Price will become the only driver of choice Brands and their names should bring clarity and simplicity to a decision process so people can choose one healthcare institution over another in their search for one that matches their values and needs The name is extremely important but only if it represents something For those hospital administrators who are considering a name change for their organization 1 A name is a very important symbol through which an organization can communicate the essence of what they are and project a snapshot of the promise they make A good effective name may be so well conceptualized that it captures and communicates the brand But usually it requires additional help making the brand promise come alive 2 In healthcare a brand promise must be consistently delivered at every touch point as if it is Starbucks The name must communicate the anticipated experience 3 Names and their associated brands have the ability to provide direction both internally and externally and to serve as a way to differentiate from the competition 4 The complexity of a healthcare experience requires the brand to simplify the decision making process The name and the brand story serve as a filter an emotional bond and a compass orienting people toward your institution or away from

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/11/25/don_t_lose_your_hospital_brand_when_chan (2016-02-10)
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