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  • Hospital Impact
    take to create a great leader who can survive the neck break pace of healthcare reform Astute leaders surround themselves with excellence a team that strives to carry out the mission and vision of the organization while analyzing ways to continually improve But what intangibles make a great leader While there are hundreds of books on this topic I always go back to my roots Some of the basic lessons instilled in me as a child are the same lessons that have supported my growth and success as a leader Three years ago I wrote a book for my three adult sons about the important lessons I hoped I had taught them about life I was reminded of this when I read 10 Essential Strategies for Leaders Living in a Complex World an article by Joy Goldman published last week in Becker s Hospital Review Read more Leave a comment Empathy essential to provider patient relationship February 28th 2014 by Darlene A Cunha Patient care is more than healing it s building a connection that encompasses mind body and soul When dealing with patients and families coping with illness empathy is one of the greatest interventions a caregiver can bring forth Trying to understand another s experience requires effort and intention People often equate empathy with sympathy Sympathy however is an awareness of another person s situation and is almost an automatic response such as That s so terrible I sympathize with you Sympathy is important and is part of what humanizes a caregiver but empathy is essential to a successful caregiver patient relationship Read more Leave a comment Previous Page Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=Darlene%20Cunha&page=1&disp=posts&paged=3 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - In healthcare, technology is not the answer--data is
    I read a cover story on big data The author wrote we need smart people to analyze our data I agree and disagree The majority of our healthcare management leaders are smart educated and experienced clinicians Yes they are smart but they do not have the right skills set to analyze data We built IT departments in hospitals to bridge that gap I don t believe that solution works for the long term big picture So the question becomes how do we provide data analysis tools to our smart clinicians The answer is so simple My true confession starts now As a self proclaimed Data Diva who provides almost 100 percent of data analysis performed at my facility I have never received any IT education Sure I ve been using Excel for years but let me repeat myself I have never received any IT education It was simple enough to acquire skills through practice Working with data means working with Excel spreadsheets And data analysis means sorting Excel columns over and over until you notice an outlier It doesn t take a smart person to do what I do Here s a case from last week Our medical records department reported it had a severe delinquency issue with physician documentation and asked for help Medical records knew it had a problem because it had a huge pile of incomplete charts What it didn t have is a huge pile of meaningful data therefore I asked the department to create a simple list I knew this was another case of emotion versus evidence I sorted the list by physician and immediately found four doctors who were responsible for 80 percent of the delinquencies As always the 80 20 rule applies in any big data set I quickly created a data illustration using a simple bar chart and publicly posted my findings This task took me three minutes to complete at most Luckily I ve never met a physician who doesn t panic when they see their name on the worst list Without any twisting of arms our delinquency issue disappeared Lord Kelvin a physicist from Belfast who died in 1917 said without a numerical understanding we have no understanding Unless we manage with metrics and data what do we actually manage Data teaches us that emotional anecdotes although interesting and dramatic never get resolved Data is the greatest single tool for compliance I ve ever met Lynn McVey serves as chief operating officer of Meadowlands Hospital Medical Center an acute care 230 bed hospital in New Jersey Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/11/12/in_healthcare_technology_is_not_the_answ (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    could retire Read more Leave a comment Time to look at the bigger picture on patient safety September 17th 2015 by Lynn McVey When it comes to patient safety we are still practicing disease care instead of health care One of my favorite times of year is when new annual healthcare data is released If you re a data junkie like me you ve probably already read Measuring the Quality of Healthcare in the U S which the Kaiser Family Foundation produces each year This year Kaiser celebrates that the quality of the U S health system is improving in many areas However when data junkies like me review data my spider senses start tingling and my skepticism forces me to drill deeper At the top of the data pile is overall mortality rate In 1990 1 075 patients died per 100 000 In 2013 only 835 patients died per 100 000 which appears to be an improvement Unfortunately if we drill deeper we see self reported health status data In 1996 15 percent of patients report fair poor health status whereas in 2013 that increased to 18 percent Before we celebrate that we keep patients alive longer we need to ask if a longer life with poor health should be a celebration Read more Leave a comment Death in the family reveals need to respect patients end of life wishes August 13th 2015 by Lynn McVey It was 2 38 a m the phone call I was waiting for My Dad was 92 and lived a full life of family fun faith purpose and service He was healthy up until the day he went into heart failure With his 30 page attorney prepared Advance Directive in hand he announced to his family and cardiologist that he planned to follow his instructions under the sub chapter heart failure My 92 year old Dad refused to have a pacemaker inserted For four days we gathered family and friends to say goodbye to the man who had no enemies Many times there were 10 or more in his room listening to him tell stories about each of us as he held our hands and hugged us It was obvious he was prepared for this moment It was actually very beautiful to watch him acknowledge everyone individually say an emotional goodbye and leave each of us with some gift of advice for our future happiness On the fifth day his heart rate was dipping into the 30s which would have been his final day with us In a surprise last minute call he agreed to have a pacemaker He lived another six months at my home I was fortunate enough to live the last chapter with my Dad We shared meals American Idol That Jennifer is one pretty girl he d say both Mondays and Tuesdays my porch swing his granddaughter root beer floats tennis matches career talk and stories I had never heard before For me that was a priceless six months

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?s=Lynn+McVey&sentence=AND&submit=Search (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Medication reconciliation between care settings: A proven way to lower readmissions, save money
    offer patients a safeguard and a second set of eyes after discharge so that potentially devastating errors can be stopped One such initiative implemented by HealthCare Partners California is successfully ensuring that the baton is effectively handed off between discharge from a SNF and the patient s support network at home The positive effect it has already had on patients is impressive and it should serve as a model for all of us in the medical community that cutting edge programs like this save lives and money It is a win win for everyone involved The medication reconciliation program developed by HealthCare Partners Pharmacy Services connects a team of pharmacists and pharmacy students with patients discharged from participating SNFs Within 72 hours of the patient s return home a member of the pharmacy team reviews medication discrepancies discusses possible interventions and develops an action plan which often includes contacting the discharging physician and providing comprehensive education to the patient and his or her family Results of the pilot program to date have been remarkable Of 226 patients discharged during a six month period in 2014 79 percent required reconciliation of their medication lists and 53 percent needed some sort of change or intervention to their therapies Although seemingly minor the smallest interventions can make a significant difference Patients who might inadvertently be taking double the dose of a blood thinner or blood pressure medication or who have failed to begin taking new critical medicines to treat heart failure or diabetes can be properly managed by the simple involvement of a knowledgeable pharmacist While undeniably beneficial and potentially lifesaving for patients medication reconciliation programs are also good for Medicare s bottom line With billions of dollars lost each year to paying for avoidable hospital readmissions smart programs such as this one can make a notable difference For example HealthCare Partners saw lower 30 day all cause readmission rates 8 20 percent compared to other SNFs in California with similar patient compositions and characteristics but without a pharmacist medication reconciliation program 15 32 percent Year over year analysis of the intervention program showed a decrease in 30 day acute readmission rates from 10 43 percent in 2013 pre intervention year to 8 20 percent in 2014 intervention year Keeping our patients safe and healthy is an ongoing process that requires multi disciplinary involvement and unique solutions Understanding that our responsibility to the patient does not end when they walk out of our doors is the first step toward developing impactful programs that truly make a difference In addition to Riya Pulicharam M D HealthCare Partners national medical director the team of Health Care Partners Medication Reconciliation Pilot consisted of Linda Aoyoma M D Riya Pulicharam M D Chan Chuang M D Sheila Salamunovich Pharm D Sylvia Hastanan B S N and Steve Kawahara Pharm D Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/11/05/medication_reconciliation_between_care_s (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    of our community hospital Palm Drive Hospital had served this community continuously for 73 years The first hospital was built in 1941 It was replaced by a modern new 47 bed hospital structure that opened in 1975 However by 2014 the hospital s owner Palm Drive Health Care District was facing its second bankruptcy in just seven years The hospital closed its doors on April 27 2014 When a small rural hospital closes its doors the effects on its community can be dramatic Rural hospitals are economic engines in their communities as they are usually the largest employer in town And of course jobs in hospitals are paid well above the average of other employers in the area Hospital jobs also cause a positive ripple effect by helping to grow other jobs in the community as well Read more Leave a comment ICD 10 Collaborative ways to reduce operating costs October 29th 2015 by Jonathan H Burroughs With the introduction of ICD 10 on Oct 1 there are now 132 500 new codes and new ways for healthcare organizations to be paid less based upon inadequate documentation or worse documentation that does not support the services rendered Thus it is incumbent upon healthcare leaders and physicians to come up with new ways to manage documentation through clinical documentation improvement CDI initiatives that lower operating costs improve the accuracy of documentation and improve the effectiveness of revenue cycle management performance What are organizations doing and how does this impact a physician s work flow I Training programs ICD 10 training programs have emerged as an opportunistic industry however organizations can deal with training physicians nurses and healthcare personnel in a far more cost effective way Most clinicians work with approximately 30 40 DRGs that make up 80 percent of their clinical practice It is important that they have at their fingertips the most common DRGs they are likely to encounter with a list of the documentation elements necessary to optimize reimbursement given any level of acuity Even better is to imbed decision support tools in the computerized physician order entry system so that if key elements are missing they may be given decision prompts Read more Leave a comment 3 strategies for changing the health insurance business model October 29th 2015 by Rita Numerof In the face of a market wide demand for lower costs many of the players in the healthcare space have defined their strategic response as doing what they ve always done but for less After decades of financial success it s difficult to think about meaningfully changing the business model For their part insurers have gotten tougher in negotiations with employers and providers Every calendar year is an exercise in explaining to financially strapped employees why they have to pay an even larger share of ever more expensive insurance The mega mergers among payers can be properly interpreted as one side of an arms race with providers to improve negotiating leverage through scale Payers have also tried

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/?blog=1&page=1&disp=posts&paged=9 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Balancing act: Promoting health and wellness
    enjoys his job and will stay until he s told they don t need him anymore Something tells me that won t happen given my sense of his work ethic and great attitude Last month in collaboration with the Cape Coral Chamber of Commerce we launched a city wide fitness challenge with more than 100 participants this first year It was modeled after a similar fittest executive challenge we had in Kansas City Mo The key Look ourselves in the mirror to understand our true health risk factors and overall fitness level Each week we meet at 12 05 p m for a one mile walk with leaders and staff We have anywhere from 10 to 50 people join us It helps everyone clear their minds and decompress for few minutes This past week I was rounding in the hospital after 10 p m I brought some healthy and alternative options Yes all the healthier treats did go pretty quickly And yes people still appreciated those not so healthy alternatives So now the struggle Our healthcare costs keep rising Typically there is a small percentage of employees utilizing the highest number of resources As healthcare executives is it part of our responsibility to promote health and wellness In my opinion absolutely There is a balance we all try to manage Certainly that balance tips if we lean towards judgment or intrusive opinions We owe it to our employees volunteers and physicians to educate and provide them with better options to live a healthier lifestyle We also owe it to our community to ensure we have a healthy team to care for them provide exceptional service and keep costs down There is a balance to promoting health and wellness that can lead to pushiness if not managed We do not have to try everything today or even tomorrow I ve heard You can t teach an old dog new tricks How many 73 year olds do you know training for their 1st triathlon you can teach new tricks and may find you are never too old to enhance your ways and help your organization and the communities you serve Thanks Marion I look forward to hearing your views Scott Kashman serves as the Chief Administrative Officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/04/18/balancing_act_promoting_health_and_welln (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - What it takes to achieve surgical success
    faced with the same operational issues The advisory group has kept us focused on one or two improvements at a time ensuring we are on track before taking on another initiative It certainly took the first two to three meetings to vent and share overall frustrations Now it s safe to say we are on a good road to improve our surgical department It s only happened by engaging our physicians staff and leadership team in this process and aligning our efforts towards a shared vision By no means do I think this is an end point This is a model we will use to improve the success of our hospitalist program emergency department and intensive care unit as well Please share some of your efforts with medical staff employee and leadership engagement Scott Kashman serves as the Chief Administrative Officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds failed to act on earlier outbreak 8 developing healthcare trends Hottest Products Compare Top Solutions in Hospital Management Electronic Medical Billing Software Healthcare Revenue Cycle Management Practice Management Software Clinical

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/03/15/align_staff_leadership_efforts_to_reach (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - How our hospital is making employee wishes come true
    have made a conscious effort to meet or reintroduce myself to at least 5 to 10 people every week Most people show appreciation when I ask for their name again it s much better than Hey umm you The welcome exchange makes for an overall warmer environment and that good energy spreads to their colleagues and our patients 3 Holding self and each other accountable This week I had a lengthy discussion with our hospital senior leadership team regarding accountability The key things discussed Make sure everyone on the team knows what s expected and how everyone will be held accountable The team members want to see everyone contributing towards the shared goals This has a big impact on staff engagement positive and negative if not addressed All the wishes will be shared with our team so we can work through them together In no way should you provide a false hope that everything will be fixed and furnished What should be shared is the opportunity to see how everyone can contribute to the greater cause So I ask you what are your three wishes for your department and healthcare organization Scott Kashman serves as the Chief Administrative Officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/01/18/how_our_hospital_is_making_employee_wish (2016-02-10)
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