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  • Hospital Impact - Healthcare leaders must avoid burnout and remember their 'why'
    enough time away from work How do you know if you are burned out If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms burnout may be to blame Fatigue Irritability Crying easily Anxiety attacks Unexpected weight gain or loss Teeth grinding Increased drug alcohol or tobacco use Insomnia Nightmares Forgetfulness Low productivity at work Inability to concentrate What are the effects of burnout Burnout can affect your physical and mental health It can lead to Depression Anxiety Physical illness i e stroke or heart attack What can you do if you are burned out Before you can cure your burnout you have to figure out what is causing it You must also take into account the severity of your burnout The more severe it is the more drastic your fix will have to be Here are some possible cures Find more time to relax I know not so easy to do Take a vacation I know need more money for that but certainly take time for yourself along with time with family and friends Minimize any overtime Check out your work and home environment Try to add some walking or movement into your day Your organization cannot reach its full potential until you reach your own Let me know your why and what drives you every day to bring your best and follow your passions I look forward to hearing from you Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/05/28/p5501 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - 'Wave' into a better management system
    relate to our healthcare efforts As I paid more attention to this probably more than one should analyze it hit me that we have similarities in healthcare In healthcare we have started huddling much more than years prior discussing ways to support our patients and families our colleagues and ourselves We are essentially moving care coordination down the field toward improved health More We have three focus areas in our hospital supportive of our commitment as an optimal healing environment Safety Flow Experience So knowing we are huddling to impact the three operational priorities above I tried an experiment with our system wide orientation and hospital specific staff on boarding There are two key components I share about Lean Standard work Job instruction Keeping in mind they will get more thorough Lean training it seemed like a unique way to break the ice and a light hearted way to introduce Lean It also showcases key lessons on ways we are a safe organization So I show the group the standard way to do the wave giving a big whooooah and my arms stretched up high Then I provide job instruction to show where they will start and where the wave will end including a high five to the last person We wash our hands afterward of course Then we review what could be better and what worked well Feedback usually includes themes such as their enthusiasm teamwork coordination fun need to get out of your chair and participate clarity of directions and how well they listened to directions We then review ways they could incorporate these themes into their daily work The tie in is similar Ensure care coordination Provide direction and ask for clarification as needed Show enthusiasm optimism and yes even fun there is a time and place in the workplace to have fun Demonstrate teamwork and collaboration Stand up and help no sitting around when the team and patients needs you Ask for feedback provide feedback and make changes based on feedback So the next time you try the wave let us know what you learned Ready to do the wave On three 1 2 3 Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds failed to act on

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/04/23/wave_into_a_better_management_system (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - 'Wave' into a better management system
    relate to our healthcare efforts As I paid more attention to this probably more than one should analyze it hit me that we have similarities in healthcare In healthcare we have started huddling much more than years prior discussing ways to support our patients and families our colleagues and ourselves We are essentially moving care coordination down the field toward improved health More We have three focus areas in our hospital supportive of our commitment as an optimal healing environment Safety Flow Experience So knowing we are huddling to impact the three operational priorities above I tried an experiment with our system wide orientation and hospital specific staff on boarding There are two key components I share about Lean Standard work Job instruction Keeping in mind they will get more thorough Lean training it seemed like a unique way to break the ice and a light hearted way to introduce Lean It also showcases key lessons on ways we are a safe organization So I show the group the standard way to do the wave giving a big whooooah and my arms stretched up high Then I provide job instruction to show where they will start and where the wave will end including a high five to the last person We wash our hands afterward of course Then we review what could be better and what worked well Feedback usually includes themes such as their enthusiasm teamwork coordination fun need to get out of your chair and participate clarity of directions and how well they listened to directions We then review ways they could incorporate these themes into their daily work The tie in is similar Ensure care coordination Provide direction and ask for clarification as needed Show enthusiasm optimism and yes even fun there is a time and place in the workplace to have fun Demonstrate teamwork and collaboration Stand up and help no sitting around when the team and patients needs you Ask for feedback provide feedback and make changes based on feedback So the next time you try the wave let us know what you learned Ready to do the wave On three 1 2 3 Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds failed to act on

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/04/23/p5406 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Why healthcare leaders should ask for feedback
    we care about each other They interviewed more than 200 individuals They could tell how much we like each other That shows trust and that helps drive process change and cultural transformation They also recognized our positive journey and the strong integration as an entire health system We could not have done it without the leadership and guidance from Nancy Travis and Chris Crawford who guided our efforts They loved our food and shared that it was the healthiest place they have surveyed Several of the surveyors even grabbed a juicer on the way out The preliminary process strengths and results were as follows Clinical outcomes Patient centered focus Workforce engagement Showcasing how we are caring people caring for people Process management and improvement with the integration of LEAN and ISO Our trust based team culture Focus on wellness and as an optimal healing environment Financial outcomes Community focus and how the lines were blurred in a good way specifically how we view our own team as a community in addition the community we serve outside our hospital Process and results opportunities included Continue to foster physician engagement in our on site session called Connectivity Hardwire systematic approaches with leadership rounding and huddle boards which are already well under way Trial by journey and our learning trajectory we are early in some of our efforts and they shared how they look forward to learning how we progress over the coming years Patient satisfaction scores still lower than our system goal they understand we are working through this Unexpected off season volumes impacting salary trends we brought 40 additional beds on line after budget which impacted our costs and they recognized the need to do this Emergency department length of stay and left without being seen they recognized the census levels hospital and system wide impacting this with our plans to improve flow This was a great survey and reflection of our ongoing journey We are very proud Oh one more thing if you accept and solicit feedback often it will not shock your system and changes are much easier to make So I ask you all Any feedback for me and our other Hospital Impact readers Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/03/11/why_healthcare_leaders_should_stay_humbl (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Why healthcare leaders should ask for feedback
    we care about each other They interviewed more than 200 individuals They could tell how much we like each other That shows trust and that helps drive process change and cultural transformation They also recognized our positive journey and the strong integration as an entire health system We could not have done it without the leadership and guidance from Nancy Travis and Chris Crawford who guided our efforts They loved our food and shared that it was the healthiest place they have surveyed Several of the surveyors even grabbed a juicer on the way out The preliminary process strengths and results were as follows Clinical outcomes Patient centered focus Workforce engagement Showcasing how we are caring people caring for people Process management and improvement with the integration of LEAN and ISO Our trust based team culture Focus on wellness and as an optimal healing environment Financial outcomes Community focus and how the lines were blurred in a good way specifically how we view our own team as a community in addition the community we serve outside our hospital Process and results opportunities included Continue to foster physician engagement in our on site session called Connectivity Hardwire systematic approaches with leadership rounding and huddle boards which are already well under way Trial by journey and our learning trajectory we are early in some of our efforts and they shared how they look forward to learning how we progress over the coming years Patient satisfaction scores still lower than our system goal they understand we are working through this Unexpected off season volumes impacting salary trends we brought 40 additional beds on line after budget which impacted our costs and they recognized the need to do this Emergency department length of stay and left without being seen they recognized the census levels hospital and system wide impacting this with our plans to improve flow This was a great survey and reflection of our ongoing journey We are very proud Oh one more thing if you accept and solicit feedback often it will not shock your system and changes are much easier to make So I ask you all Any feedback for me and our other Hospital Impact readers Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/03/11/p5296 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Hospital-community partnerships: Be the spark
    shared our vision and blueprint for our Pathway to Discovery it became easier to engage more leaders One of the first to support our efforts was the American Heart Association which donated planters and their teaching garden curriculum From there the school system was interested in collaborating Of course that meant lots of kids wanted to participate That led to more community businesses and residents donating funds towards the area exercise equipment and benches to create a healing space for all to thrive This space could be used for outside physical occupational and speech therapy It is a campus now open to our public as we moved toward a privately owned public park model on a hospital campus Before you know it we had city and governmental leaders showing interest and joined in our first planting day These efforts showed how you could take a simple yet innovative idea and watch it prosper before your eyes These hospital and community collaborations provide some grassroots approaches to learn from each other and move toward achieving healthier community members better care better health and lower costs What s your idea to spark community interest Scott Kashman serves as the chief administrative officer of Cape Coral Hospital part of the Lee Memorial Health System in southwest Florida Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/02/11/p5221 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Using social media for community engagement: A success story
    lot of people were checking in at our Family Birth Suites area and posting pictures and comments about our department on Facebook These were not controlled by us and were also not monitored by our hospital I requested the necessary permissions to take ownership of our Facebook page and it has really taken off Here s some of the ways we ve optimized social media to engage with patients We use our page to connect with our clients and families to post news of events that will be happening and to provide them with education on topics related to pregnancy and childbirth It allows us to get our message out to the community Social media provides patients and families another way to contact us prior to their admission or after discharge and ask questions and get a response quickly We celebrate the great things we do on our unit by sharing pictures with our followers Consent is always obtained from patients and families prior to posting photos It is amazing how much response we get from our pictures Some of our pictures have garnered more than 10 000 likes shares It also is interesting to see how our social media posts have been shared with other areas of the United States as well as other countries We have been contacted for policy sharing and for advice from other health care organizations from our post and we get ideas from our followers on what they would like for new services in our department When we were doing some remodeling of our unit we asked our Facebook followers what was important to them and more than 1 200 followers responded The parents requested an area that they could bring their babies back to the hospital any time they wanted to weigh them This area was designed and built and now is a community resource for new parents that is used daily The main thing to remember is that a social media site does need to be monitored and it needs to be updated frequently There is nothing worse than a site that is not updated Do not start one without a commitment to do the follow up needed to keep the page alive Here s some tips for upkeep Posts need to be made several times per week Activity needs to be monitored on a minimum of two times per day but ideally more often People who are asking questions on social media want a response quickly Monitor the check ins to your facility respond to concerns or compliments and use it as a tool to promote exceptional patient experience Many people think that social media is a problem and should be avoided by healthcare leaders but we have found social media to be an asset for our hospital and for my department It allows our clients to stay connected to us prior to admission during their stay and after discharge What ways has social media helped you to engage with your

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/01/15/using_social_media_for_community_engagem (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Using social media for community engagement: A success story
    lot of people were checking in at our Family Birth Suites area and posting pictures and comments about our department on Facebook These were not controlled by us and were also not monitored by our hospital I requested the necessary permissions to take ownership of our Facebook page and it has really taken off Here s some of the ways we ve optimized social media to engage with patients We use our page to connect with our clients and families to post news of events that will be happening and to provide them with education on topics related to pregnancy and childbirth It allows us to get our message out to the community Social media provides patients and families another way to contact us prior to their admission or after discharge and ask questions and get a response quickly We celebrate the great things we do on our unit by sharing pictures with our followers Consent is always obtained from patients and families prior to posting photos It is amazing how much response we get from our pictures Some of our pictures have garnered more than 10 000 likes shares It also is interesting to see how our social media posts have been shared with other areas of the United States as well as other countries We have been contacted for policy sharing and for advice from other health care organizations from our post and we get ideas from our followers on what they would like for new services in our department When we were doing some remodeling of our unit we asked our Facebook followers what was important to them and more than 1 200 followers responded The parents requested an area that they could bring their babies back to the hospital any time they wanted to weigh them This area was designed and built and now is a community resource for new parents that is used daily The main thing to remember is that a social media site does need to be monitored and it needs to be updated frequently There is nothing worse than a site that is not updated Do not start one without a commitment to do the follow up needed to keep the page alive Here s some tips for upkeep Posts need to be made several times per week Activity needs to be monitored on a minimum of two times per day but ideally more often People who are asking questions on social media want a response quickly Monitor the check ins to your facility respond to concerns or compliments and use it as a tool to promote exceptional patient experience Many people think that social media is a problem and should be avoided by healthcare leaders but we have found social media to be an asset for our hospital and for my department It allows our clients to stay connected to us prior to admission during their stay and after discharge What ways has social media helped you to engage with your

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/01/15/p5156 (2016-02-10)
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