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  • Hospital Impact
    define how they fit into the culture of their healthcare organization Read more Leave a comment How to keep docs from going broke February 8th 2012 by Anthony Cirillo It s hard to ignore a headline that reads Doctors Going Broke But that was the gist of the article in CNN Money last month According to the article half of all doctors in the nation operate a private practice And many are on the verge of financial disaster The usual litany of blame was cited shrinking reimbursements changing regulations rising business and drug costs Read more Leave a comment How to help hospital employees find their flow January 4th 2012 by Anthony Cirillo In his book Drive The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us Daniel Pink talks about the concept of flow I ll describe it my own way When I work on music in the recording studio at home I am oblivious to everything time thirst hunger etc I can go in the studio at 7 00 p m and not even realize that it is 4 00 a m when I get done That s because in flow Pink says people lived so deeply in the moment and felt so utterly in control that their sense of time place and even self melted away He makes the case that when this happens to employees it is magical And he realizes that not every work experience provides surges of flow He goes on to say that the shrewdest organizations afford employees the freedom to sculpt their jobs in ways that bring a little bit of flow to otherwise mundane duties Read more Leave a comment Retain CEOs to cultivate your hospital culture December 1st 2011 by Anthony Cirillo I am going to put forth a New Year s Resolution a month early and get ahead of the competition Let us resolve to reduce CEO turnover and instill succession planning in healthcare organizations Why Because according to the September October issue of Healthcare Executive there was a 14 6 percent CEO turnover rate in 2001 That jumped to 17 percent in 2009 and my feeling is that it is now probably higher Is it consolidation forcing the need for fewer CEOs Is it the retirement of baby boomer age CEOs Or is it the stress and burnout caused by the position I am voting for the last one Read more Leave a comment Previous Page Next Page Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=anthony%20cirillo&page=1&disp=posts&paged=10 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Data shows most healthcare comes from relationships
    just keep the persons heart beating they won t have to feel the pain of loss The nurses know what is coming but the system fails the patients when nurses are not positioned to sit and share time with patients and or families through the sadness of the dying process and talk with them about the fear and the unknown The blog post Compassionate care is a crucial component of care by Joyce Hyam We must reinforce the importance of providing compassionate care as it does make a positive impact on all of our lives These are all brilliant stories so poignant so impactful so connected to the important things in healthcare and in life And yet still to this day these messages are not the norm when thinking about how to improve the healthcare system When was the last time you heard a healthcare leader say Let s improve the healthcare system by increasing the opportunities for healthcare providers doctors nurses therapists etc to truly connect with their patients Or Let s invest in training our healthcare providers on how best to make an authentic connection to establish relationship to be emotionally intelligent to be truly present to listen to engage to empathize Interestingly the same rich conversation about payment reform mentioned above also netted fascinating data points that linked very nicely to the healthcare relationship stories I received For instance 10 percent of health outcomes is due to actual healthcare The other 90 percent is due to health behaviors socioeconomic factors and the physical environment Digging into the numbers even deeper of the 10 percent of health outcomes due to healthcare 90 percent of what physicians do involves connecting with patients and 10 percent involves the science as taught in medical schools 30 years ago and highlighted in Dr Craig Koniver s blog post Fascinating I thought and loving numbers I calculated further Based on these data 1 percent of health outcomes is due to the science of medicine 9 percent of health outcomes is due to practitioners connecting with their patients 10 percent is due to the patients physical environment 40 percent is related to socioeconomic factors and 40 percent comes from health behaviors Payment reform or the importance of relationships to healing clearly my heart chose the latter for this week If these data are correct or even in the ballpark it is even more imperative that healthcare system improvements be they in care provision delivery system changes and or reimbursement strategies are in line with bringing relationship and connection back into the healing process Electronic health records the latest pharmaceutical drug a new surgical technique are all important to optimal healing But they are not more important than the connection between a healthcare worker and a patient Don t believe me Just look at the numbers Thomas H Dahlborg M S M is Vice President for Strategy and Project Director for the National Initiative for Children s Healthcare Quality NICHQ where he focuses on improving

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2011/11/16/title_31 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Does clinical guideline adherence mean quality care?
    Infectious Diseases Society of America between 1994 and 2010 were based upon properly randomized controlled trials Then you come across The Truth Wears Off article about the decline effect and its application to clinical research outcomes and you begin to further understand the challenges of empiricism Processing all of this information you refer back to the blue ribbons awarded to your new physician for clinical guideline adherence and hope that the guidelines she and now you are following were derived from research that IS considered trustworthy from PROPERLY randomized controlled trials in which the decline effect has NOT been shown to be at play You wonder how even the best of the best clinical guidelines which are resultant from the trustworthy research and properly randomized controlled trials can be effective for each and every patient You ask Are all diabetic patients the same Are all patients with high blood pressure the same Am I the same as every other patient with my same diagnosis You consider your own situation One of your grandparents and two of your cousins have received the same diagnosis as you You have two children in college and are taking care of your elderly mother while working full time Your allergies are working overtime and your gut is just not quite right You wonder if a 12 minute office visit with your new physician truly positioned you both to account for all of these variables Were all of these data points best leveraged in planning your specific course of treatment You further contemplate whether the clinical guidelines recommended by your physician are really appropriate for you Or worse could they be harmful You begin to imagine an improved model of healthcare that would better meet your needs as a patient the needs of your family and the needs of your community With your patient hat on what does it look like Now put your healthcare leader hat back on and please ponder the following questions Are your goals as a patient congruent with your goals as a healthcare leader Should they be Is right care at the right time at the right cost the same for everyone Should it be Is strict adherence to clinical guidelines to be awarded Even if the clinical research leveraged to create the specific guidelines is potentially questionable Is strict adherence to clinical guidelines to be rewarded Even if we are each a complex adaptive system with thousands of variables at work at any one time Is your healthcare organization honoring all aspects of the Hippocratic Oath e g I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart a cancerous growth but a sick human being whose illness may affect the person s family and economic stability Now with your health leader hat still on imagine an improved model of healthcare that would better meet your needs as a healthcare leader AND your needs as a patient What does this new model of healthcare look like What one specific

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2011/07/13/does_clinical_guideline_adherence_mean_q_1 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Connecting relationships to optimal outcomes
    Address the cause improper diet and or lack of exercise and impact the effect obesity And yet many of these individuals never achieve their goal of losing weight What happens These patients are typically labeled non compliant many are shamed many change doctors and many over time incur health issues related to their obesity This is a basic example of Newtonian scientific principles in healthcare This is also an example of a failed healing encounter and a broken healthcare model Now let s bring time relationship caring continuity trust and empathy back into healing and change the story A patient who is clearly overweight walks into a doctor s office to see HER doctor the doctor she knows and who knows her The doctor and patient have ample time together to develop a relationship Through this relationship they develop trust With time relationship and trust they share empathy This healing encounter becomes a safe place This is a place where the patient can share non linear aspects of her life which are impacting her ability to address her weight challenge Perhaps this individual has an unhealthy relationship with food due to an abuse issue from when she was a child Or maybe this individual has an unhealthy relationship with exercise due to a traumatic series of events in organized sports promulgated by a coach who clearly should not be coaching Perhaps there are family dynamics economic factors and other environmental inputs all impacting this individual s weight This patient is a complex adaptive system as we all are Understanding the connections of all of the sub challenges and then addressing the non linear root causes interconnections and relationships will best position this individual to achieve their health goal But without time relationship caring continuity trust and empathy the physician patient encounter is limited at best with minimal information sharing and lack of mutual understanding and must rely on the suboptimal Newtonian linear cause and effect methods of healing Leveraging the fluff and seeing each patient as a complex adaptive system leads to an optimal healing encounter in which both parties together identify the non linear factors impacting the patient s health and co create a patient specific healing protocol that addresses those challenges Healthcare leaders must remember that connecting time relationship caring continuity trust and empathy to the healing encounter is truly a key to reforming healthcare and for best positioning ourselves our families and our communities for optimal healing Thomas H Dahlborg M S M is executive director of the physician practice True North Health Center where he focuses on improving growth while ensuring access for the uninsured and the elderly He has 21 years of experience creating competitive advantages analyzing customer expectations and developing and implementing focused and aligned strategic deployment plans Formerly he served as the chief business strategy officer at Network Health a comprehensive Medicaid health plan based in Cambridge Mass and was COO of the U S Family Health Plan at Martin s Point Health

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2011/06/15/connecting_relationship_to_optimal_outco (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    amazing individuals who through the political process are striving to improve the health of individuals and communities We were there to share innovative options to address chronic illness and access as well as to discuss that age old question how does one measure quality Read more 5 comments Healthcare quality metrics may do more harm than good April 12th 2011 by Thomas Dahlborg Lowering elevated blood pressure and elevated cholesterol levels are two key metrics associated with improving and maintaining health More and more focus is being placed on these and other similar metrics Reimbursement is being tied to individual linear metrics via Pay for Performance and other programs In 2015 CMS through its Physician Quality Reporting System PQRS intends to begin penalizing physicians for not reporting data on these types of metrics Awards and recognition are being handed out for achieving them Physicians and physician practices are being rated on them Consumers you and I are being educated to select our preferred provider based on these metrics And yet is such a linear approach to measuring healthcare quality truly benefiting individuals and communities Read more 1 comment Saving lives lowering costs and improving access the old fashioned way March 22nd 2011 by Thomas Dahlborg Earlier this month Bonnie Smith RN Gov LePage s Deputy Commissioner of the Department of Health Human Services shared the administration s perspective on health policy in the state of Maine Smith shared the goals of improving access ensuring accountability reducing costs and improving the health status of individuals and communities Wonderful aspirations and clearly hard to argue against A question and answer session soon followed along with a discussion concerning the challenges of emergency room overutilization A number of individuals stood up to impart how they are addressing the issue Read more 2 comments Doctors promise holistic care under Hippocratic Oath February 28th 2011 by Thomas Dahlborg I recently was astounded to find quite a bit of woo woo language in the Hippocratic Oath that suggests empathy is part of true healing For example the Oath says I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science and that warmth sympathy and understanding may outweigh the surgeon s knife or the chemist s drug Who would have thought that warmth and sympathy could potentially be more important than the surgeon s knife or a prescription drug in healing Considering the myriad reimbursement models emphasizing production and invasive procedures rather than time to develop relationships and trust and the priority given to drug therapies our current healthcare system does not believe this to be the case Read more 9 comments Previous Page Next Page Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=true%20north&page=1&disp=posts&paged=7 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - ACHE 2015: 4 habits of highly effective healthcare leaders
    is no place that s probably more rewarding Through Schlichting s leadership Henry Ford was able to grow even amid Detroit s shrinking population and her health system has been a driver of social and economic revitalization in the region through community partnerships and initiatives like the Live Midtown program that provides incentives for Henry Ford employees to live in downtown Detroit It s important to champion the communities we serve Schlichting said Embrace a broad scope of experiences For healthcare leaders the more experience you can have on the physician side and the health plan side the better positioned you will be for the future Starmann Harrison said during the lecture she and Umbdenstock conducted on the topic of executive leadership Umbdenstock pictured left agreed noting that he gained invaluable healthcare leadership experience during the time in his career when he was self employed and when he worked for an HMO Effective leaders also are able to turn what some may view as a negative situation into a positive learning experience Starmann Harrison said adding Probably some of my best experience was when I was a mergee in a health system acquisition and thought the world was ending and decided to embrace that opportunity Read the full story at FierceHealthcare Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/03/18/ache_2015_4_habits_of_highly_effective_h (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Lessons learned from a dizzying doctor search
    surgeon who would be acceptable to the payer and who agreed to follow a different approach He proceeded with a core biopsy of each region and unfortunately confirmed multi focal cancer He scheduled Mary for a total bilateral mastectomy Mary s surgery went well and after chemotherapy the biggest question was the appropriate follow up I decided to search for an oncologist who specialized in breast oncology and if possible triple negative breast tumors This was no easy feat After six months of poring through my network of physician contacts calling multiple academic center oncologists and reaching out to breast cancer researchers I nearly gave up Finally a medical school friend referred me to her research supervisor who recommended an expert in triple negative breast cancer that she knew This oncologist Dr H was widely published in breast cancer research and was located close to Mary After months of helping Mary navigate a complex world of cancer care I reflected on the lessons I had learned It was frightening to me as a physician how different Mary s care would have been if we had simply followed the advice of her initial surgeon for something as nuanced as triple negative breast cancer As hard and inefficient as it was to find them I felt lucky that we were able to find Drs C and H A few months later I was having coffee with a former colleague of mine Graham Gardner a cardiologist by training and the co founder and CEO of Kyruus Graham believes that physicians are no different than any other person they each have strengths and weaknesses training and knowledge that enable them to better care for certain conditions compared to their peers Doctors are not necessarily good or bad they are just skilled in different areas in the same way a baseball pitcher has a different skill set than a center fielder I asked Graham if he could find a triple negative breast cancer oncologist for Mary He typed in Mary s zip code insurance carrier and triple negative breast cancer into a Google like search box In less than six seconds Graham identified what had taken us six months Dr H was at the top of the list I have since joined the company to help bring technology to improve the dizzying healthcare space I went into medicine to make the world a better place Having seen the journey that Mary endured I wanted to help other patients avoid the agony of losing precious moments to lengthy wait times and misdirected referrals It s exciting to know that technology can be used to improve the healthcare experience improving patients access to the right specialists and creating better health outcomes for patients just like my aunt Mary Sid Anand M D is the associate medical director of Kyruus Inc a company focused on identifying ways to enhance patient care and the patient provider relationship He also is an actively practicing hospitalist at Cedars Sinai Medical Center

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/02/03/lessons_learned_from_a_dizzying_doctor_s (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    first hand during two specific interactions within our hospital accounts that showed the real power of social media to help people Read more Leave a comment Digital job shift could impact hospitals social media June 26th 2014 by Nancy Cawley Jean I recently read a blog post by Arik Hanson arikhanson about well known people in the digital world switching jobs In his post Hanson said Research has proven that ambitious upwardly mobile employees get a little bored after a few years in the same role They master the job quickly get bored and want a new challenge This is exactly what is happening in social right now Social media became a real job in the past five to six years We launched social media for the hospitals in the Lifespan health system in 2009 and we were among the first 5 percent of hospitals to do so According to the Health Care Social Media List maintained by the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media as of this writing 1 563 hospitals now use social networks The American Hospital Association reports there are 5 723 registered hospitals in the United States so 27 percent of hospitals have jumped into social media That s up 22 percent in five years Read more Leave a comment Will new health IT developments really revolutionize healthcare June 11th 2014 by Kent Bottles Three recent events forced me to think about how and when data will revolutionize healthcare For years I ve read and heard about how data wireless sensors and personal health records will change how I interact with my doctors Full disclosure I contributed to this overhyped hysteria The three events are Apple s unveiling of its cloud based HealthKit platform and Health user facing application the annual Health Datapalooza summit of true believers and the reorganization of the Office of the National Coordinator ONC Apple s Worldwide Developers Conference revealed that its iOS 8 operating system will facilitate the development of new health and fitness apps and that Apple created new partnerships with Epic Systems Mayo Clinic UCLA Cambridge University Hospital in the U K Stanford Penn Medicine and other prominent medical centers Read more Leave a comment What hospitals should know about changing social media April 17th 2014 by Nancy Cawley Jean Things always change in the world of social media and sometimes it s hard to keep up Recently two things cropped up that deserve more attention than others Heartbleed The big news last week was the security breach dubbed the Heartbleed encryption bug because well it s just so bad It leaves users of many sites not only social media vulnerable to security breaches Hospitals using social media should check which sites updated and change passwords accordingly but don t do it unless the site was actually updated with a patch So how do you know if you should update your password or not This Mashable story has info on major sites Also this website will check domains for

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=nancy&page=1&disp=posts&paged=2 (2016-02-10)
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