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  • Hospital Impact - Healthcare quality metrics may do more harm than good
    s look at the lowering elevated cholesterol levels metric It is well known that lowering cholesterol levels is essential for better health No brainer right However according to the Harvard Medical School Harvard Health Newsletter the relationships among cholesterol levels psychological function and neurologic disorders are complex and sometimes controversial Controversial From Discovery Health a Duke University Medical Center study late 1990s found that healthy women with cholesterol levels below 160 mg dL were more likely to show signs of depression and anxiety than women with normal or high cholesterol levels Researchers in the Netherlands published a study in 2000 showing that middle aged men with low cholesterol are more likely than other men to have symptoms of severe depression A seven year epidemiological study shared by Dr John Briffa on his blog The Cholesterol Truth found that in men low levels of low density lipoprotein LDL cholesterol supposedly unhealthy cholesterol were associated with an increased risk of depression In women low levels of high density lipoprotein HDL cholesterol supposedly healthy cholesterol were associated with an increased risk of depression And yet the individual linear metric we focus on is lowering elevated cholesterol levels and in our siloed system the mental health connection is not even assessed So again a physician can do an amazing job and help his or her patients achieve lower cholesterol levels and thus achieve the metric and receive the same adulation as shared above But that physician also may be doing more harm than good when considering the bigger health picture in this case the mental health impacts Jennifer Eames Hoff of the consumer advocacy group Pacific Business Group on Health has said It s the tension between how good is good enough Do you really want to get to this super scientific rigor that will take years and years Or can you live with a measurement system that is really really good and could usher in dramatic improvements in patient care I don t necessarily disagree with Ms Hoff I simply believe we are not yet at the really really good stage and what we currently consider really really good can be dangerous Yes individual linear metrics can be quite helpful in context as they are snapshots of improvement steps on the pathway to a larger health goal To truly assess quality and outcomes a comprehensive 360 degree view that includes individual linear metrics is essential Anything less than that can incentivize wrong behaviors and or incorrect approaches to care and can be dangerous I am okay with sacrificing PERFECT for GOOD I am not okay with sacrificing PERFECT for DANGEROUS Thomas H Dahlborg M S M is executive director of the physician practice True North Health Center where he focuses on improving growth while ensuring access for the uninsured and the elderly He has 21 years of experience creating competitive advantages analyzing customer expectations and developing and implementing focused and aligned strategic deployment plans Formerly he served as the chief business strategy officer

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2011/04/12/beware_of_metrics (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Fixing the healthcare system without sacrificing jobs
    a job can be devastating devastating financially emotionally mentally physically Losing a job impacts the individual the family and the community And yet perhaps this well meaning individual simply does not understand the damage that will be done to those same people if we do not fix the current healthcare system Maybe this individual doesn t connect the fact that higher healthcare employment and higher healthcare costs do not equate to higher quality of care Perhaps this individual has not read Overtreated by Shannon Brownlee and does not realize that each year our medical system delivers an enormous amount of care that does nothing to improve our health or lengthen our lives Between 20 and 30 cents on every healthcare dollar we spend goes towards useless treatments and hospitalizations towards CT scans we don t need towards ineffective surgeries towards care that not only does nothing to improve our health but that we wouldn t want if we understood how dangerous it can be Maybe this individual does not understand the intricacies of healthcare reimbursement and how the traditional healthcare model is still primarily incentivizing and rewarding productivity and invasive procedures over health outcomes and how these perverse incentives place our friends our families and our communities at risk Based on this conversation only two options were on the table Do not fix the current broken healthcare system but continue to create jobs within the broken system while continuing to place patients at risk and driving up healthcare costs OR Fix the current broken healthcare system and lose jobs But is this truly an either or argument Aren t there other options Can t we adapt and do better Instead let s fix the healthcare system eliminate the financial incentives that put patients at additional risk due to overtreatment AND create jobs that are aligned with and within the fixed system that truly provide value to both the patient and the system Let s create an efficient and effective system that provides far more value helps people get and stay healthy AND positions these same people to be innovative in job creation in other sectors Or better yet let s just have it all and do both Thomas H Dahlborg M S M is executive director of the physician practice True North Health Center where he focuses on improving growth while ensuring access for the uninsured and the elderly He has 21 years of experience creating competitive advantages analyzing customer expectations and developing and implementing focused and aligned strategic deployment plans Formerly he served as the chief business strategy officer at Network Health a comprehensive Medicaid health plan based in Cambridge Mass and was COO of the U S Family Health Plan at Martin s Point Health Care in Portland Maine 5 comments Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2011/04/27/fixing_the_healthcare_system_without_sac (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    resembles brick and mortar in the context of our healthcare system They represent power conquest legacy building and achievement and yet are not always in line with what is best for the populace Much time energy capital and human resources have been invested in brick and mortar in the healthcare system and much pomp and circumstance and celebration of same But does a new building represent a true achievement when we are discussing the lives of individuals Are we focused on the right priorities Read more 4 comments Reliable clinical research is missing piece of healthcare reform puzzle January 2nd 2011 by Thomas Dahlborg When considering whether the healthcare reform is a success industry observers often regard access and cost of care as the main criteria But they may be leaving a critical component out of the equation Take the 2006 Massachusetts MA healthcare reform bill which has reportedly led to 98 percent of the state s residents having health insurance including 99 percent of the state s children So if the goal of healthcare reform in MA is to improve access to health insurance for people then the Massachusetts model can be considered a success On the other hand this healthcare reform bill has reportedly neither cut health care spending nor improved access to care Read more 7 comments ACOs Wolves in sheep s clothing December 15th 2010 by Thomas Dahlborg I d like to continue the discussion Dr Jesse Cole sparked with his recent article ACOs are based on flawed assumptions To add to the discussion accountable care organizations remind me of the definition of insanity doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results Raise your hand if you are familiar with the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care receivership of the late 1990 s a step akin to bankruptcy protection and one that put the insurer under state control Read more 2 comments How one payer is trying to fight obesity December 1st 2010 by Brad Wilson Hard times force difficult choices That s particularly true in healthcare where government businesses and workers already struggle to fund growing healthcare needs Yet it is imperative that we invest in reversing certain health trends that will otherwise overwhelm the system Obesity is an epidemic that plagues the entire nation and here in North Carolina we re particularly affected Nearly two thirds of adults are overweight or obese Read the full guest commentary by Brad Wilson who is president and CEO of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina at FierceHealthPayer 3 comments Previous Page Next Page Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=true%20north&page=1&disp=posts&paged=8 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    Read more Leave a comment Set rules for docs on social media February 17th 2014 by Nancy Cawley Jean Back in 2011 I wrote a Hospital Impact post about why doctors should be careful when using social media I m not changing my stance on the issue but I recognize that social media and clinicians use of it has come a long way in a short amount of time If it was accepted before it s expected now So what prescription should doctors write for themselves when it comes to using social media The answer is pretty simple Use it and remember what it s for Recently the Rhode Island Board of Medical Licensure and Discipline issued guidelines for doctors on how to use social media appropriately I m glad they did this for two reasons First it lets doctors know that it s OK to post out there in the big social sphere and they won t lose their license by doing so Second it gives them the dos and don ts of what to do Read more Leave a comment Healthcare reform calls for new skills attitude toward patient care January 29th 2014 by Kent Bottles American physicians need to be free to do what they have been trained to do excel at practicing medicine American patients need to be free to choose the health insurance plans and medical treatments that suit their needs not something coerced by a central authority This simply cannot occur under the suffocating burden of the Affordable Care Act Richard A Armstrong M D Under the Affordable Care Act physicians who effectively collaborate with other providers to improve patient outcomes the value of medical services and patient experiences will thrive and be the leaders of the healthcare system Robert Kocher M D Ezekiel J Emanuel M D Nancy Ann DeParle Physicians have been caught in the middle of the transformation of the American healthcare delivery system brought on by the Affordable Care Act Doctors who oppose the legislation and those who support it are trying to adjust to a rapidly changing healthcare environment Read more Leave a comment What job candidates can teach healthcare communicators January 7th 2014 by Nancy Cawley Jean Sometimes we do a job for so long that we lose perspective We think been there done that But with a new year just beginning it s a great time to take a fresh look I recently had the opportunity to interview a candidate to fill an open position on our media relations team in replace of a colleague who recently left I developed four questions I thought would give me a good sense of her work style and skills and where her passion lies Getting a better feel for that would help me determine if she was a good fit for our team The interview went really well and the questions did exactly what I hoped They led us to a much deeper discussion of how things have changed in

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=nancy&page=1&disp=posts&paged=3 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Who's responsible for protecting patient privacy on social media?
    patient s likely embarrassing event has gone public This scenario played out in real life at a Lifespan hospital in Rhode Island and was the topic of discussion on a thought provoking Hospital Impact blog post last week by Nancy Cawley Jean senior media relations officer of social media at Lifespan The situation Jean described proved that patient privacy in the social media age is an evolving issue and hospitals need to get ahead of it Was the patient s privacy breached Is the hospital responsible To hear how hospitals should handle such situations read the full article at FierceHealthcare Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds failed to act on earlier outbreak 8 developing healthcare trends Hottest Products Compare Top Solutions in Hospital Management Electronic Medical Billing Software Healthcare Revenue Cycle Management Practice Management Software Clinical Information Systems CIS Clinical Data Repository Software CDR Medical Billing And Coding Medical Transcription Services Healthcare EDI Systems Evaluate more than 4 000 products Healthcare Finance news The shifting role of the healthcare CFO From sites to systems Medical malpractice Former HCA chief proposes alternative to current system Price transparency push in Florida Missouri Hospitals

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/10/08/who_s_responsible_for_protecting_patient (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - When social media violates patient privacy
    management departments involved The first step was to call the local police who said they couldn t help Next a member of the legal team contacted Google directly to request that the video be removed Its response No The site would not take it down Google didn t feel the video was violating its user agreement so it didn t matter if it was a violation of our policy or what we felt was a violation of a patient s privacy The only way we could pursue this was to go through very expensive litigation which we felt was not justified or warranted We were disappointed but not entirely surprised In this day and age with social media as prevalent as it is it s important to know that you can take all the steps you think necessary but there s always the possibility of a breach of privacy It s one thing when it s a member of your staff that can be addressed But when it comes to the general public you are at the mercy of their discretion and that s not a safe bet Another lesson from this real life tale is it s still imperative to have a social media policy in place It can help you make decisions about how to respond to negative posts and it can guide your staff when they re posting to social networks If you haven t written one already there are plenty from hospitals to review here on Ed Bennett s blog It s also a reminder to have Google alerts and other monitoring tools in place to catch these mentions of your institution Even if you can t get the response you would like you can at least comment to show that you are aware of what is being said about you And that is a necessity today because even if you aren t talking about yourself in the social media world you can be sure that others are Have you had any breaches of privacy in social media at your institution How did you deal with them Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for the Lifespan health system in Rhode Island managing social media for five hospitals and a women s medicine practice Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital groups clash on Massachusetts bill to improve response to violence Superbug linked scopes Feds failed to act on earlier

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/09/25/when_social_media_violates_patient_priva (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Why hospitals need experienced pros to manage social media
    learned through experience Older professionals like me have had to learn social media as one of many skills We ve also done a lot of research on how to incorporate that as a tactic into our overall marketing efforts Therein lies a key difference those of us who are over 25 or 35 or 50 for that matter have established ourselves as communications professionals often specializing in hospital and healthcare marketing We have worked many years to hone our skills find out what works and use the newer tools that come along to support our efforts Social media can be a slippery slope In exactly the same way that we would not leave our crisis communications in the hands of an eager fresh graduate I believe the same is true of social media There are reasons why we say five or more years of experience when hiring someone for the role It is not only experience with social media we are looking for but the whole communications package I am not trying to discredit the younger generation new blood and fresh ideas are always welcome and are a key part of the success of an organization But there is something to be said for good old fashioned experience and that should not be discounted in the world of social media What do you think Do you agree with her blog post and her reasoning Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for the Lifespan health system in Rhode Island managing social media for five hospitals and a women s medicine practice Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/08/21/why_hospitals_need_experienced_pros_to_m (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Make personal connections with social media
    darker days when the thoughtful and well planned posts garner no response or there is a need to ban a user from Facebook due to policy violations More All of these examples can or do happen to anyone who manages social media for a hospital in real life and in real time It can be incredibly rewarding and sometimes overwhelming but these examples are exactly why hospitals must understand that the person who manages social media wears many hats and for all intents and purposes IS the public face of the hospital in all those social media outlets As I take time this summer to reflect on my role there is one thing that stands out for me For the first time in more than 25 years in healthcare communications I feel like I am actually able to connect with people I m inspired by the opportunity to help someone in a one on one situation almost every day I ve provided a link to a map of our largest hospital campus for someone looking for the right parking lot for their appointment I ve helped a volunteer get into an orientation so she could be at the hospital during her summer break not in September when she was back at school I ve sent kind words to families who were worried about their child in the pediatric intensive care unit I ve shared excitement with families when a loved one reaches a milestone or turns a corner or gets discharged Those are things I could never do when I was coordinating events writing speeches managing a press conference or pitching a story From a marketing standpoint these are kinds of actions that create a lasting impression of an organization and help to instill brand loyalty among members of the community That in a nutshell is the beauty of social media and why it s so powerful for hospitals It creates an opportunity for a personal connection to be made to your patients their families your community and beyond Hospitals are scary places but social media might just be able to make them a little less scary At least I hope so What do you like best about social media Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for the Lifespan health system in Rhode Island managing social media for five hospitals and a women s medicine practice Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can foster family centered care Pediatric ER seeks to limit stressors for autistic patients Nurses hospital

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/07/11/title_56 (2016-02-10)
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