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  • Hospital Impact - Tips to keep patients engaged with Facebook pages
    health information and health tips that will help them But there s also nothing wrong with mixing it up and throwing in some more casual content Ask a question the polling options in Facebook are great for this be a little silly have a personality and share some non health related info Your fans will appreciate it Here are some kinds of posts I ve found to generate good feedback and engagement Everyone loves controversy Post a controversial news story and ask people what they think about it Last week I posted the story of the mom who was tanning way too much and also was accused of bringing her daughter to a tanning salon The comments came in fast and furiously Then we were able to nicely tie that into the fact that our director of pediatric oncology was going to be on a local radio station talking about that very subject Your employees are your best advocates Invariably when you post something about members of your staff they are more likely to comment AND share it with their friends so you re getting an even bigger reach than your own audience One of the biggest responses we ve had to date on one of our Facebook pages was when we posted the photos of our staff who were part of our latest television ad We teased the ad on our page by posting photos of the shoot on a Friday before the ad launched to great acclaim Then that was followed by the posting of the actual video on Monday The response from both staff and the public was phenomenal and it was our most shared post ever for that page Let them tell their story In social media people expect to have their voices heard and they are accustomed to sharing all facets of their life on social media So give them a forum to do so We received one of the best responses after asking parents to post pictures of their children and share their stories We ve now got an ongoing album of the faces of the children we ve treated and those parents were of course sharing those links with their friends helping us spread the word At the same time they were telling their stories of the great care they received Another example is giving a shout out to nurses for National Nurses Week and asking people who their favorite nurse is and why These types of posts often result not only in great engagement but also first hand accounts of the great care your hospital provides And we all know word of mouth advertising is the strongest Those are just some of the types of posts that I ve found work well on Facebook in building engagement and a loyal following What works well for you Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for Lifespan She is a communications and media relations specialist focused on national media relations for research

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/05/09/3_facebook_posts_that_keep_patients_enga (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - What Facebook Timeline can offer hospitals
    posts to your wall likes and comments This new panel gives you the ability to simply click on a post and be able to respond right there without scrolling through your wall to see what s new This panel also includes other important features that you should be using and they re explained below Messages Brands now have the ability to send direct messages to people and those messages will not appear publicly on the wall This is fantastic for the healthcare sector because there are some things that the public just shouldn t see For instance someone asks a personal health question and rather than risk the chance of violating HIPAA regulations you can respond with a direct message to that person It s a quick personal way to address a concern and it s private This also is a great way to address complaints and avoid negative posts filling your wall Insights It s important to post content that will be educational and support your strategic priorities but if you re not engaging with your community it s almost pointless The new insights which are provided in a quick view format in the admin panel give you statistics on every post from reach to how many â œlikesâ and comments each individual post received You also can get a much more detailed report by clicking on all insights Use this to your advantage and look for patterns and trends to see what types of posts give you the most bang for your buck After all it s all about engagement in the social media world Highlighting Pinning The new timeline gives you more flexibility with your posts Rather than just dropping down on the wall you now have the opportunity to pin posts to the top so they stay up front giving more visibility to those high priority posts You also have the opportunity to â œhighlightâ a post by having it spread across the two columns rather than just one making it more visible again think strategic priorities The Timeline itself What better way to show the strength of your hospital than to provide a whole history of firsts breakthroughs and highlights than through the actual timeline Through this historical account you can promote your organization s entire history with highlights by year including photos Those are my favorite new features in the new Facebook Timeline format although I m sure there are others I haven t discovered yet What do you think of the new Timeline and do you have other favorite features Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for Lifespan She is a communications and media relations specialist focused on national media relations for research at Rhode Island Hospital and its Hasbro Children s Hospital and managing social media for the hospitals within the Lifespan health system Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/04/11/how_hospitals_can_use_facebook_timeline (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - SXSW shows why healthcare social media is here to stay
    and Jamie Heywood the co founder of PatientsLikeMe Their overall message is the healthcare industry must change No surprise there of course They also highlighted that one area to address is improving access and providers can do that by allowing eVisits patient consults with a doctor through Twitter or email and having insurers pay for that visit at a reduced rate If that s not enough to convince you that social media isn t just a fad this might The last session I attended was a panel discussion on whether citizen journalists are real journalists Citizen journalists are those individuals who are reporting from the scene of big news events from Occupy Wall Street to the uprisings in Egypt and Syria The panel included Jennifer Preston NYT JenPreston staff writer social media reporter for the New York Times Eric Carvin EricCarvin social media editor for The Associated Press Tim Pool TimCast a citizen journalist from Occupy Wall Street who became a go to source during the demonstration by major media outlets and Jigar Mehta JigarMehta a documentary filmmaker and Co Founder of 18 Days In Egypt GroupStream a platform for these citizen journalists to share their information What was the big message Major media outlets like the NYT and the AP are now turning to these citizen journalists who are reporting events through social media Of course their reports must be verified but they truly have become legitimate media sources As I sat and listened a thought occurred to me Hospitals are a conservative industry with about 20 percent across the country using social media In a crisis how long does it take for a hospital to get a statement out Given the world of social media and the rapid flow of information it is now imperative to start feeding out information during a crisis through these channels Even if the hospital isn t there are others in the community who are becoming citizen journalists and feeding information to the media Maybe it will be verified maybe not But that means your hospital s message which is carefully crafted and sent through review channels is going to be lost unless you are providing regular factual credible updates through social media The media is not going to wait for that statement So given this type of information what will your hospital do during your next crisis Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for Lifespan She is a communications and media relations specialist focused on national media relations for research at Rhode Island Hospital and its Hasbro Children s Hospital and managing social media for the hospitals within the Lifespan health system Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/03/15/why_healthcare_social_media_is_here_to_s (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Heed these healthcare social media reminders
    a hospital would bother having a Facebook page that wasn t open for comments but I digress For hospitals that already are using social media the report includes a section on managing content and responding to posts about your brand This may be one of the biggest takeaways of the report Does your organization have a plan for monitoring social media around the clock If not it should When we launched our social media efforts in 2009 this was not something we thought about But as time went on it became increasingly apparent that in social media people do not want to wait days for a response to an inquiry Likewise if a negative comment about your brand is posted do you want that out there for days without being addressed We developed guidelines and protocols so that we monitor our brand 24 7 365 It s a necessity even though it may be difficult to manage given the resources within some healthcare organizations The report also talks about some of the many risks inherent in social media I m sure the statement that garnered the interest of our risk management folks was Risk managers should also be aware that information created or shared via social media could be subject to e discovery in the course of litigation While I was aware of this piece of information it tends to slip to the back of my mind so this report was a good reminder of the relevance of social media The once you tweet it s out there forever idea can come back to haunt you and has for so many brands The report ends with some clear recommendations for healthcare organizations to follow including developing a plan assigning individuals to social media developing goals and identifying the appropriate social media tools to support those goals One of the recommendations is something I believe we should all be doing if we re not already including social media in HIPAA privacy training for all staff As I read this I realized that it might be a good time to review our privacy policy and our patient consent forms to incorporate social media into them When was the last time you reviewed yours I thought this report was really well done and serves as a good reminder of some things we know and some things we might have forgotten I encourage other healthcare communicators to check out this report What other actions should we as healthcare communicators take to minimize our risks in the social media world Nancy Cawley Jean is a senior media relations officer for Lifespan She is a communications and media relations specialist focused on national media relations for research at Rhode Island Hospital and its Hasbro Children s Hospital and managing social media for the hospitals within the Lifespan health system Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2012/01/24/heed_these_healthcare_social_media_remin (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact
    in this big digital world What is it how can we take part in it and how does it help our brand Doing the research and connecting with others who also are doing this kind of work will benefit the background researcher Read more Leave a comment 5 things the Netflix fiasco taught hospitals October 20th 2011 by Nancy Cawley Jean The Netflix Qwikster debacle if you haven t heard get the story here taught us many things that we as hospital communicators can certainly use whether it be in social media or more traditional forms of communication Stick with your brand If you ve got something that works don t fix what isn t broken You ve established a brand you ve built a community you have loyal customers Keep doing what you re doing If it s not working by all means tweak it But don t do like Netflix and just go ahead and change everything just to confuse people Read more Leave a comment Is Google the next social media tool for hospitals September 28th 2011 by Nancy Cawley Jean For more than two years I ve been working with social media to build brand awareness and share important health information for the hospitals I represent Our current arsenal includes Twitter Facebook and YouTube Over that time I ve seen an explosion in the use of these tools among hospitals Now just when we build a comfort level with these networks a new one breaks onto the scene Google has arrived At first it was in beta and an invitation was needed to try out this new social network Now Google is available to the masses and as of this writing its usage surged 1 269 percent catapulting it into the top 10 social networks Last week alone it tallied 15 million visits to its site While that s peanuts compared to Facebook it could very well become a formidable contender Read more Leave a comment How to manage Facebook backlash against the hospital August 23rd 2011 by Nancy Cawley Jean I believe in transparency in managing Facebook pages for hospitals It s vital if you want any credibility in the social sphere If there s something bad going on I remind the communications team we need to include Facebook messaging in the communication plan and the sooner the better Of course this transparency always comes with a risk How will our Facebook friends react to this news and what will the comments look like Read more 2 comments Previous Page Next Page Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get Hospital Impact in your inbox Healthcare Industry news Final Obama budget takes aim at opioid addiction superbugs Zika outbreak White House seeks 1 8B to respond to virus More hospitals replace nurseries with rooming in with moms Hospitals must train millennial nurse leaders in empathy frontline engagement St Louis hospital creates unit to improve outcomes through innovation 4 ways hospitals can

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php?blog=1&s=nancy%20jean&page=1&disp=posts&paged=7 (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Healthcare organizations: Steer clear of vendors with ties to terrorism
    C Suite are obligated to sign quarterly attestation statements for our organizations as part of the Sarbanes Oxley legislation Our signatures attest to the accuracy of our financials that we have no fraud and abuse and we are not doing business with individuals or companies on a government sanctions list With that kind of liability we should all want to have systems in place to assure accuracy with a high level of confidence Fallacy No 1 But I had no idea we were doing business with these people We are a massive organization and have thousands of vendors The government does not care The verbiage of the regulations state that you know or should have known which means that lack of knowledge is no excuse Fallacy No 2 We audit the Office of Inspector General OIG list on an annual bi annual quarterly monthly basis so we have it covered The reality is that there are approximately 100 national and international sanctions lists and not just the OIG Also changes can occur in those lists every day so the standard should be a daily vetting of all of the sanctions lists Fallacy No 3 We have demanding internal checks and balances an internal audit department and a very stringent annual tax auditor we have fraud and abuse covered This is truly known as the famous last words whose business equivalent is we have it covered Our organizations are too complex and people are too creative Many health care organizations recognize that you have to take this area to a higher level to truly reduce costs and mitigate risks Taking risk mitigation to the highest level There are companies that perform a vendor registration and authentication process that collects data and organizes your vendor master file into a standard platform This makes it easy to bounce that vendor list against all of the sanctions lists every day Those organizations that use traditional means to mitigate risk as opposed to this identified best practice run the risks of hiring a terrorist Sometimes it is not easy to identify a terrorist note the aforementioned East Coast hospital s experience Remember know or SHOULD have known is how the regulations read Budget positive Companies that specialize in vendor master file cleanup accounts payables audits and vendor registration and authentication actually have a positive impact on the budget Cash is recovered and costs avoided that more than pays for the program In addition many of the costs associated with the registration and authentication process are vendor paid Share the great story with your board Everyone loves to share a great story with your boss or governing body By using best practices from the banking and finance industry you can bring new cash into the organization prevent fraud and abuse lower your risk of penalties and fines and be assured that you are not hiring unknown terrorists a good story worth telling indeed Joshua Curtis is an experienced margin improvement adviser for multiple industries including healthcare

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/08/06/healthcare_executives_hire_terrorists_at (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Which will drop first in October: A clean claim or your revenue?
    the CMS testing Have you conducted internal audits and compared the actual coding to the ICD 10 standards S ecure a line of credit The probability that claims will be rejected and your reimbursement will decline is very high Securing a line of credit to support the cash flow needs during the transition period will help your organization weather the change Refresh your training This is especially important for physicians Documentation is going to be the very real limiting factor in this transition Physicians and clinicians have to be able to substantiate the codes Much of the training that has been deployed and adopted has been directed at coders and billers but physicians also should go through training and demonstrate proficiency with the new documentation requirements Training should consist of more than an online portal or written documentation Communicate with your payers Assess their readiness Payers are also making this transition and you can bet that they will experience disruption and challenges in their transition It just makes sense for organizations to assess the readiness of their partners because it takes execution on both sides to drop a clean claim and receive the appropriate reimbursement Plan for and document any workflow changes As organizations deploy ICD 10 many are establishing quality and control steps during the transition period to ensure correct billing These processes should be documented in the event of staff turnover or an audit Assume you are not ready Many readers will say we are prepared The reality may be far different Since 2009 the Workgroup for Electronic Data Exchange WEDI has surveyed providers on ICD 10 readiness The most recent WEDI survey showed that providers have actually regressed in their readiness for the change Only a quarter of providers claim to have tested their readiness with CMS which is down from a third in 2014 Twenty percent said they have no plans to test Top performing organizations are conducting assessments and training to ensure everyone is ready In some cases they are turning to experts to help them in this transition They are securing lines of funding to cover possible declines in cash flow based on the changes and they are not sitting back and assuming they have it covered They are following the ancient wisdom of the stoics and are preparing for the worst while moving forward to achieve the best John Gies johngies mdresources net is an experienced sales business development and coaching executive accomplished in multiple verticals including healthcare retail and utilities He currently serves as a managing partner of MDRâ Fresno California in the area of revenue cycle Kevin L Shrake kevinshrake mdresources net is a 35 year veteran of healthcare a fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives and a former hospital CEO He currently serves as the executive vice president chief operating officer of MDR Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search terms Submit search form Web www hospitalimpact org Get

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/07/02/which_will_drop_first_in_october_a_clean (2016-02-10)
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  • Hospital Impact - Proper training can lower risks of hospital-acquired infections
    fraught with challenges Employees are busy and it is hard to pull them away from the job site for training The quality of the training is variable Many facilities fail to document competency It is difficult to train all employees during all shifts Hospitals may train one group of workers and have different people show up at the work site Hospitals may train employees in a specific area and the have workers float from other units Live training with infection control personnel is time consuming and expensive Imagine the following scenario in your facility Contractor employees are working near a radiology suite without proper barriers and engineering controls As they work they disrupt a debris cart cover made of fabric that has not been cleaned in more than a month The bacteria and fungi that had been carried on the cover now travel through the air and attach to medical instruments lab coats and other items that will come into contact with patients throughout the hospital Although the contractors were following protocol they did not know how infections are spread and consequently did not take the necessary precautions to protect patients Even the smallest amount of migrating dust can severely harm patients especially those who have weakened immune systems and result in the development of an HAI or even death Checklist of best practice training protocols Now that we have reviewed the impact of the quality problem and the challenges to provide effective training to mitigate risk what are the characteristics of a best practice training process E learning video modules increase information retention by up to 60 percent Post tests document competency as a result of the training E learning allows training to be available 24 7 to cover all shifts new employees etc Use of cloud storage allows for readily available documentation of training and competency Cloud based video training allows for a consistent training message to be delivered to each participant Cloud based e learning programs are generally vendor paid and then made available to hospital employees at no charge Look for a company willing to provide grants to the hospital to support initiatives to reduce HAIs Quality tied to finances It has always been the right thing to do to operate our facilities in the highest quality fashion The importance of reducing HAIs and lowering readmission rates is heightened because of the reimbursement changes that are part of healthcare reform Poor quality now results in lower reimbursements and penalties Following best practice training protocols will help mitigate the risk of quality issues and provide a safer more cost effective environment for those we serve Kevin L Shrake kevinshrake mdresources net is a 35 year veteran of healthcare a board certified fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives and a former hospital CEO He currently serves as the executive vice president chief operating officer of MDR based in Fresno California Leave a comment Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus Enter your search

    Original URL path: http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2015/06/04/proper_training_can_lower_risks_of_hospi (2016-02-10)
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