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  • Hualapai HDNR - pollution
    placement of wildlife cattle drinkers outside of the wetland areas has eliminated non point pollutants and rejuvenated riparian habitat and vegetation associated with the spring wetlands There are several new additional spring enhancement projects scheduled in 2003 Sediment control devices retention dams have been constructed in selected major watersheds to prohibit and control pollutants from entering spring flows and enhancing water quality standards The control devices are temporary in nature and are subject to wash out if there are major flood events in the monsoon season Due to the extreme drought conditions of the region in the past five years repair and replacement of the control devices have been minimal and water quality is within acceptable standards Storm water runoff and drainage from different facilities on the reservation will be surveyed and assessed Determining the potential contaminants kept stored and used at each facility and devising best management practices and public education on potential contaminant activities that could enter the community s ground water aquifer The Water Resource Program is also working on acquiring a thorough understanding of all groundwater aquifers throughout the reservation Using existing well log records of the different aquifers indicating the depth of the well depth

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/pollution-prevention.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - Water Quality
    the CWA Sect 106 Water Pollution Control water quality data submission that is coupled with the above template which also reflects a consistent and uniform reporting format on the health of the environment in Indian Country Tribal Water Quality Assessment Report Template 2010 Clean Water Act Section 106 Click here EPA region 9 template developed to assist tribes in submitting CWA SECT 106 Water Pollution Control water quality data in a consistent and uniform manner reflecting the health of the environment in Indian Country Water Quality Narrative Report 2010 Click here A EPA region 9 template component of the CWA Sect 106 Water Pollution Control water quality data submission that is coupled with the above template which also reflects a consistent and uniform reporting format on the health of the environment in Indian Country Water Quality Standards 2009 Click here Numeric and narrative water quality standards developed by the Hualapai Tribe that support designated uses of surface water bodies Water Quality Assessment Report 305 b 2009 Click here A narrative water quality assessment report reflecting the health of State Water Bodies that is required of states annually and where as tribes are not required to submit such a report although not required the Hualapai Tribe does submit a 305 b report every five years Water Quality Monitoring The Water Resources Program is responsible for the monitoring of fifty six different water sources throughout the reservation of which twelve are ground water wells from depths of 40 feet to 2 875 feet and the remaining forty four are springs that seep through the ground to extensive flows of water that run all year round Access to many of the sites is extremely difficult due to the mountainous terrain and canyon networks The different sites are accessed by helicopter riverboat and driving Most of the spring sites also require extensive hiking to gain access At each of the water source sites field parameter water quality tests are taken that include pH Temperature Conductivity Salinity Total dissolved solids dissolved oxygen Turbidity and flow measurements if there is significant spring flow On selected springs we may gather water samples and deliver to environmental laboratories where Environmental Protection Agency full suite water quality analysis is conducted to verify and ensure that our water is within our acceptable levels of our water quality standards Due to the extreme costs of water quality analysis through environmental laboratories the Water Resources Program has developed draft bio monitoring protocols where we will gather macro invertabrate samples to assess the water quality of different spring sources and health of wetlands instead of laboratory analysis SWAPP stands for Source Water Assessment and Protection Program This program is established to ensure the protection of our drinking water sources and develop and implement Best Management Practices for contaminant activities around well areas This source water protection plan is intended to meet the requirements of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act SDWA and the Hualapai Tribe s Water Resource Program The Hualapai Water Resource

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/water-quality-monitoring.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - pronghorn antelope
    Non regulation Regulation bucks are characterized as bucks with horns extending past the ear These individuals are considered trophy animals and are hunted on a yearly basis Non regulation bucks are characterized as bucks with the horn not extending past the ear These individuals are not harvested A total of 126 Pronghorn Antelope were seen and classified during the 2002 surveys The population survey consisted of 30 regulation bucks 8 non regulation bucks 83 does and 5 fawns The buck 100 doe fawn ratio was 46 100 6 The fawn data may be biased due to the time that the antelope were surveyed Many of the fawns have grown large enough to be indistinguishable from adults when trying to classify from an aircraft Only antelope that were obviously fawns were counted as such Looking at the survey data that has been gathered by the Hualapai Department of Natural Resources in the past ten years we find that the antelope population as a whole has been declining This trend is also similar when you look at the different classifications of pronghorn antelope Antelope populations fluctuate according to a few different factors most importantly available food available water and amount of predation These factors are greatly influenced by annual precipitation Winter rains stimulate native grass growth which is great forage as well as cover for fawn survival Of course more rain makes water more available for antelope to drink In 1992 and 1993 there was record rainfall in most of the Western United States Consequently the population of antelope was fairly high as seen in our data In the years following 1993 we had some very dry weather which adversely affected antelope populations In 2000 Arizona experienced some good winter rains which have brought a good crop of native grasses to the

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/antelope-1.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - wetlands
    place of birth to be washed Doing this made the child become part of the spring and the child can return to the spring for guidance and blessing The child is related to the water Exotic vegetation Point non point pollutants Macroinvertebrat es Birds Surface groundwater Cultural Water Quality Fish Recreation Wetlands perform many functions that are important to the Hualapai Tribal members have the opportunity to continue and conduct

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/wetlands.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - drought conditions, range management, wildlife, natural resources
    identify needed drought mitigation measures to alleviate the effects of future drought in the community The Hualapai Tribe consists of approximately 2000 tribal members that are governed by a nine member Tribal Council elected by the members The majority of the tribe s income comes from tourism cattle ranching timber harvest and big game hunting Each of these enterprises can be greatly affected by drought thereby affecting the tribe s income and local economy Many visitors to the tribe s beautiful reservation one that includes 108 miles of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon are drawn by white water rafting and pristine views of the canyon During drought water levels decline increasing the dangers of rafting while wildfires increase causing decreased visibility in the canyon Cattle and wildlife are greatly affected by drought as they lack an abundance of forage and drinking water during drought conditions Finally drought not only affects the frequency of wildfire but it also affects the health of the forest by spreading the incidence of disease and insect infestation Not only does drought affect economic development of the tribe but it also affects its drinking water supplies and water supplies for fire suppression While the tribe implements stringent water conservation measures during drought conditions there is often not enough water in the main water supply Truxton well for domestic use especially when fires are burning on the reservation In mitigation activities detailed in the Plan we describe replacing a four mile stretch of lead pipe from the Peach Springs Well to the community to provide a secondary water supply In addition we propose that a feasibility study be performed to examine the possible construction of a hydroelectric dam on the Reservation that would provide a dependable water supply for community use and fire suppression as well

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/drought-mitigation.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - U.S. Fish and Wildlife
    Hualapai Tribe s desire to improve conditions for wildlife in this area through this type of enhancement Burro Capture Report On August 4 2002 Mario Bravo met with the utility game helicopter capturing crew who were contracted by the Natural Resource Department along with Annette Morgan Program Manager and Scott Crozier Tech 4 a t the Hualapai Lodge In order to make plans for a successful burro capture the following items were discussed in detail which canyons the capture would take place the time of departure in the morning and how many burro s would be captured Horse Flat canyon was the main focus point for this burro capture The Natural Resource Department had previously set up 2 panel corrals for the burro capture On August 5 2002 Mario Bravo Scott Crozier met with the capture crew at 5 00 a m at the Hualapai Lodge to begin the process of capturing Mario Bravo was designated to fly with the Helicopter crew and perform a reconnaissance of the area Horse Flat Canyon Scott Crozier accompanied the fuel vehicle to Horse Flat After observing Horse Flat Canyon 25 burros were located and the capture began immediately Three burros were captured before the Fuel Truck and Natural Resource Employees arrived A total of 24 burros were captured throughout the day Two trips from Horse Flat were made to Peach Springs with one load of 10 burro s and the second load with 12 burro s A total of 22 burros were captured on August 5 2002 T he utility helicopter had a veterinarian an hand to ensure the safety of the captured burros The comments that were expressed by the pilot and crew verified my concerns that there are many more burros in this location and surrounding canyons It would be my

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/partners-for-wildlife.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - Grand Canyon West
    GCW GCW is the Hualapai s South Rim of the Grand Canyon Thousands of visitors mainly from Las Vegas tour the Seventh Wonder of the World the Grand Canyon North Tank Solar Booster Station New Mud Tank well site that will connect to the West Water Solar Well System approximately 17 miles away The West Water Solar Water Pipeline was a water development project spanning several years and utilized assistance from various federal sources the use of several arrays of solar panels provided the energy to pump water from West Water Hualapai Nation leveraged funding from Department of Energy DOE Bureau of Indian Affairs BIA Bureau of Reclamation BOR and United States Department of Agriculture USDA The solar water pipeline was completed in 1998 and the Hualapai s claim the longest solar powered water pipeline in the northern hemisphere The potable water is stored in a new water tank with a capacity of 240 000 gallons The water is used to service 1 wildlife such as Rocky Mountain elk desert bighorn sheep antelope and mule deer 2 livestock such as cattle and horses 3 tribal members residing on the Rim and 4 visitors at Grand Canyon West Ranger Cabin Booster Station The Lower Colorado office of the Bureau of Reclamation also funded an exploratory well near Grand Canyon West Water was located at a level of 2 682 feet below the surface The flow was estimated at 12 gallons per minute Currently the Water Resource Program is working on combining water from a new ground water well source new Mud Tank Well approximately twenty miles from the West water solar well system The purpose of combining these two well sources is to have water available 24 hours a day The Mud Tank Well is in close proximity to the electrical

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/water_grandcanyon_west.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - Endangered Fish Facility, Hualapai Tribe, Fisheries
    ideal location for the facility because of it s proximity to the Grand Canyon and due to the available resources the Reservation can provide namely land and water The Hualapai Tribe has an agreement with the Arizona Fishery Resources Office to raise native fish at he Hualapai Native Fish Hatchery The Hualapai Department of Natural Resources agrees to maintain and 5000 Razorback Sucker fingerlings Tribal Responsibilities include Maintain the ponds to optimize growth of fish Feed the fish with food provided by USFWS at a rate of 1 of their body weight day adjusted monthly General monitoring visual for disease Report any problems i e die off or disease outbreak to AZFRO Parker Control vegetation in ponds Coordinate pond collection in summer to determine fish condition In 1999 the Hualapai fish facility received 5000 fish and again in 2006 5000 Razorback Sucker fish were received All fish are held in the fish rearing facility until harvested by the Arizona Game and Fish Department for studies and release Fish harvested have an average of 358 mm in length and average weight of 418 g DISEASE FREE On November 6 2007 staff from the Dexter Fish Health Unit examined 30 Razorback Suckers from the Hualapai Tribe s Fish Facility The fish were examined to determine if there were any pathogens of concern in the population of Razorback Sucker fish cultured at the facility Each Razorback Sucker was examined for viruses bacteria external and internal parasites No viruses or bacteria targeted by routine inspection protocols were isolated that would preclude any fish transfers or relocations No external or internal parasites including Asian tapeworms were present in the Razorback Sucker fish Asian tapeworms were looked for at the request of USFWS s Arizona Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office BACKGROUND The construction of Glen Canyon Dam and it s subsequent operation have contributed to the decline of the native fishes of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon Minckley and Deacon 1991 Only four of the eight species that occurred in predam times remain as viable populations A fifth the razorback sucker is still abundant in Lake Mohave but it s population is declining In 1990 the population estimates in Lake Mohave totaled 60 000 and today that estimate has declined to nearly 25 000 Burke 1994 The altered water temperature regime daily discharge fluctuations and the presence of introduced fishes are believed to be responsible for the decline of the native fish fauna At this time the Final Glen Canyon Dam Environmental Impact Statement FGCDEIS is proposing to reduce daily discharge fluctuations and to study how the modification of dam operations might allow for warming of Colorado River water to enhance native fish populations The status of threatened and native fishes of the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon have been the subject of increasing concern during the present FGCDEIS and subsequent Final Biological Opinion and Reasonable and Prudent Alternative developed by the U S Fish and Wildlife Service Service Both documents contain elements

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/endangered-fish.html (2016-02-09)
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