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  • Hualapai HDNR - National Wetlands
    localized habitats without damaging them in the process The Hualapai Tribe has partnered with Dr Larry Stevens of the Museum of Northern Arizona to implement the Seep Spring Monitoring program on the Hualapai Reservation The project which entails sampling protocols developed for the specifics of seeps and springs wetland habitats in the arid Southwest samples a wide diversity of aquatic to terrestrial macro invertebrates and assesses the seeps and spring

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/national_wetlands_newsletter.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - Colorado River
    Order has the effect of reserving for the Hualapais the right to use the river to meet its current and future requirements Notwithstanding this water right the Hualapai Nation does not have a recognized entitlement to withdraw water from the Colorado River The United States in its operation of federal reclamation projects has asserted control over withdrawals and deliveries of water It exercises that control by requiring that all such

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/water-colorado-allocation.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - elk habitat
    long trip and from being trampled died December 23 The elk released consisted of 2 adult bulls 5 spike bulls 18 cows 6 cow calves and 5 bull calves Those present at the release were Sterling Mahone Chairman of the Hualapai Tribal Council Grant Tapija Jr Council Member Inez Tapija Treasurer Charles Bandy and Norman Imus Bureau of Indian Affairs William Bailey and George Welsh Arizona Game and Fish Department several Tribal members and residents of Peach Springs Park Tanks the release site is located approximately 30 miles northeast of Peach Springs at an elevation of about 6 500 feet The predominant overstory is ponderosa pine with small pockets of Gambel oak The mixed understory is cliff rose mountain mahogany ceanothus turbinella oak along with numerous forbs and grasses Two small burned areas and one large 14 000 acre burn are located north and east of Park Tanks The burns have been reseeded and have good stands of grasses and forbs Water normally abundant in earthen tanks could present a problem during severe droughts This situation is mitigated somewhat by approximately 60 miles of pipeline and metal storage tanks that occur within the present elk range Water then can be pumped from 2 pump house stations to the tanks This nucleus herd of 36 Rocky Mountain elk successfully expanded their numbers and range enough that the Tribe saw the need to hire a wildlife manager Monroe Beecher who was working for 427 Operating Engineers was the only one to respond to the Tribe s job announcement for someone to oversee the Wildlife Department The Tribe initiated their first public hunt in 1971 Ten permits were authorized at 100 00 each six were sold and four bull elk harvested In 1987 Edgar Walema Tribal Councilman initiated the P L 98 638 process to separate the responsibilities of Wildlife Conservation to Marketing and Management In 1989 the Tribe developed a cooperative agreement to contract the Wildlife Management Program from the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the amount of 47 000 For the Tribe s Wildlife Management Department the Tribe hired Don Bay as the wildlife biologist who hired Clay Bravo and Travis Majenty as the technicians Today the Wildlife Management Department has evolved into the Hualapai Department of Natural Resources HDNR Under direction of the Department of Natural Resources the Wildlife Fisheries and Parks Program manages the wildlife its habitats and their predators Mission Statement We recognize the spiritual cultural and economic value of the wildlife and recreation resources and that these resources are an irreplaceable tribal asset We also recognize that unregulated use of the wildlife and recreation resources of the tribe would threaten the political integrity economic security and health and welfare of the Hualapai Tribe We will strive to preserve protect and improve the tribes natural and recreation resources so that tribal members and future generations shall be afforded the greatest possible freedom to use and enjoy their Reservation s resources Goals and Objectives The goals of the Wildlife

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/wildlife-improvement-project.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - water resource
    tested for pollutants that may have been discharged by development in the Peach Springs area The Hualapai Tribe has initiated laws to preserve and protect our vital and necessary natural resource water through the adoption of a Water Resource Ordinance The purposes of the Ordinance are as follows 1 To designate uses for which all Tribal waters shall be protected 2 To prescribe narrative and numeric water quality standards for all Tribal waters in order to sustain the designated uses 3 To minimize degradation of existing water quality and assure that economic growth occurs in a manner consistent with the preservation of existing uses 4 To promote the social welfare and economic well being of the Hualapai Tribe and 5 To protect the health and welfare of the Hualapai people by ensuring that water is safe for recreation drinking domestic and agricultural purposes Historical reference In conjunction with this Water Resource Ordinance containing our water quality standards the Hualapai Tribe had previously submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency Treatment as State TAS status which was expected to be finalized by mid 2003 recognizing our water quality standards The Hualapai Tribe now has the same capacity as states with respect to the Clean Water Act s Section 106 Water Pollution Control Program The 1987 Clean Water Act Amendments i e Section 518 of the Clean Water Act 33 U S C 1251 et seq added a new section titled Indian Tribes which authorizes U S Environmental Protection Agency EPA to treat federally recognized Indian tribes as states for certain provisions including financial assistance under such programs as the Water Pollution Control Program Section 518 is commonly known as the Treatment as a State TAS section The Hualapai Tribe has water quality standards Treatments as a State TAS recognition conducts annual water

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/water-ordinance.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - Council on Environmental Quality
    and comments on EISs prepared by other federal agencies maintains a national filing system for all EISs and assures that its own actions comply with NEPA Hualapai Tribe bans uranium mining The Hualapai Tribal Council has voted to ban uranium mining on its Tribal lands which are located near the Grand Canyon in Arizona The Hualapai continues to support this ban and joins other Native American Tribes in opposing what they see as a threat to their environment and to their culture With the rush for Uranium mining claims hitting the Grand Canyon area the Hualapai People are gravely concerned with the health and well being of future generations of not only the Hualapai People but of numerous other communities nearby and down gradient of these potential environmental disasters Claims of new and improved mining processes do not move the Hualapai from standing their ground Any chance of contamination no matter how minute is still a threat that is too high to bear Conservation and the Natural Resources Department Efforts to meet the challenge of conservation of natural resources include compliance with the standards of the National Environmental Policy Act on all Hualapai Lands The Hualapai prepares Environmental Assessments EAs

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/nepa.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - predation
    Currently the Tribe has a bounty on both of these animals In 2010 a total of 34 Coyotes and 4 Mountain Lion were turned in for a bounty Tribal Bounty Program 2011 Hualapai Reservation Tribal Bounty Prices Coyotes are worth 65 00 and Mountain Lions are worth 450 00 Only tribal members are eligible to collect a bounty Please keep safety in mind To reduce possible exposure to rabies when handling a coyote wear rubber gloves and a mask Have a trash bag handy too You can turn the trash bag inside out take the bottom part of the bag with one hand and grab the coyote and then work the entire trash bag over the coyote carcass into the bag without touching it If the coyote or mountain lion is behaving strangely is walking toward you acting tame acting mad is hostile foaming at the mouth etc it may have rabies If you shoot this coyote DO NOT BRING IT IN TO THE COMMUNITY Contact the Natural Resources Department or Animal Control with the location of the animal so that we can remove it Please contact Annette Bravo or Garwain Sinyella Wildlife Fisheries Parks email Annette Phone 928 769

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/predator-control.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - wetlands monitoring
    site is recorded on each visit Other details captured with photo monitoring include the presence of macro invertebrates fish birds wildlife and aqua fauna Measurable objectives for selected sites may include analysis of the hardiness and elasticity of wetlands over time from climatic or catastrophic weather events such as flash flooding recording the recovering process from grazing and trampling impacts or measuring stream bank cover over time The Water Resources

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/photo-monitoring.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Hualapai HDNR - feral
    the Hualapai Reservation In the National and Mohawk Canyons 185 wild horses had been counted Of these 50 horses were removed from the canyons however several still remain on the plateaus To the right is an image of several Feral Horses found within the boundaries of the Hualapai Reservation VIDEO Note Play and Stop buttons are currently unavailable for this video Please right click on the video screen for a

    Original URL path: http://www.hualapai.org/feral-animal-removal.html (2016-02-09)
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