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  • The HTML Writers Guild Project Gutenberg: Style Sheets
    for On the Origin of Species It can be used with documents marked up according to the gutbook1 dtd or the bookfrag dtd rime10 css A style sheet developed for The Rime of the Ancient Mariner It can be used with documents marked up according to the gutpoems1 dtd or the poemsfrag dtd Author Donna Smillie gutplay1 css A basic plain vanilla style sheet developed for She Stoops to Conquer

    Original URL path: http://gutenberg.hwg.org/gutstsh1.html (2016-02-14)
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  • The HTML Writers Guild Project Gutenberg: Marking up an e-text I
    be divided up into three parts Front matter The body of the book or document Back matter The following paragraphs are a brief account of these divisions as they most commonly are seen in a modern publication It should be remembered that not all books will include all these divisions and many will have extra divisions that are not easily described When you encounter these you must use your native wits to decide how to mark up the document These descriptions are adapted for the most part from The Chicago Manual of Style The University of Chicago Press a book well worth investing in if you have an interest in authoring or typography in general Book frontmatter The Half Title page The half title page usually only carries the title of the book Title page The title page contains the title any sub tile and information about the Author also other information such as the edition number the publisher etc Copyright page This contains a whole lot of information in a modern text In historic texts much of the usual information is missing and indeed a copyright page may not even be present Dedication If present this will usually be on its own page Epigraph This may be a pertinent quotation or statement Table of contents These are usually kept separate from the other tables The actual page numbers are of no meaning in e texts and are often omitted List of Illustrations In more modern books these may be subdivided into various types such as plates illustrations figures and maps List of Tables See above ToC List of Maps In older books these were often kept separate from the illustrations Foreword A foreword is an introduction by someone other than the author and is often some famous person Preface and Acknowledgments This may include the motivation for writing the book and the help received from various sources Introduction This includes material that is related to the main text of the book and which should be read before the rest of the book Other Front matter List of abbreviations Editorial method List of contributors Chronology The book body The body of the book itself consists of the text maps and illustrations of the book The simplest division is in to a chapter with each chapter containing a chapter title or possibly a chapter number and a number paragraphs The paragraphs may be divided into subsections Most of the e texts will not have illustrations If you wish to add an illustration from the original text then you can but great care must be taken that it is from the original text and not added in some recent addition We would suggest the use of the png format for illustrations Chapters A chapter may have a title or a number Often a chapter will be preceded by a quotation or a summary Subsections and subheads should be preserved Subheads Some chapters may have several levels of subsections If this is the

    Original URL path: http://gutenberg.hwg.org/markup1a.html (2016-02-14)
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  • The HTML Writers Guild Project Gutenberg: Tool's
    of e texts HTML Tidy This is a very useful tool for converting HTML to XHTML It can be obtained from http www w3 org People Raggett tidy Tidy is a command line tool and in Windows must be run from a DOS window To convert an HTML file to XHTML navigate to the directory that contains tidy and type at the command line tidy m asxml filepath This will rewrite the file as a valid XHTML file If you think you have a lot of errors in the original HTML file you may want to make a record of them tidy f errors txt m asxml filepath will write a log of all the errors to errors txt Users with systems other than Windows will find details of use at the tidy site XML capable Browsers If you are writing in XML you will need an XML capable browser at the time of writing this means either IE5 or Gecko Other choices can be found at http www xmlsoftware com browsers XML parsers You will need an XML parser if you are marking up in XML Numerous parsers can be found at http www xmlsoftware com parsers We particularly

    Original URL path: http://gutenberg.hwg.org/markuptools.html (2016-02-14)
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  • The HTML Writers Guild Project Gutenberg. Using XHTML for markup.
    quoted e g cellpadding 10 NOT cellpadding 10 Empty elements such as the img element must take a special form namely img Not the penultimate forward slash All non empty elements must have closing tags e g p p li li Implied closing tags are not allowed Implied elements e g in HTML the head head and body body tags can be implied In XHTML they must be written out in full The XHTML document declarations are different for XHTML documents Use View source on this document to see a typical XHTML declaration in particular not the xmlns attribute on the html opening tag N B The penultimate closing slash on empty elements such as the img element can cause a problem in older browsers For this reason it is recommended that you leave a space before the slash namely img Why should I use XHTML Because XHTML is XML it has all the virtues of XML In particular XML tools can be used on XHTML documents This means that they can be easily converted to another document type and they can be easily searched and manipulated This is an invaluable boon for researchers Using XHTML to style For the purposes of marking up an historic document it is imperative that we just use the structural and semantic elements to markup the document Even if the original text was bolded use the strong element We can not stress too strongly that you should not use any of the style elements of XHTML We repeat Do not use any of the style elements of XHTML All styling should be done by style sheets The shortcomings of XHTML XHTML is a very simple language as far as book type languages go and it is not very descriptive In fact XHTML really only

    Original URL path: http://gutenberg.hwg.org/markupXHTML.html (2016-02-14)
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  • The HTML Writers Guild Project Gutenberg. Using XML for markup.
    this note anyway Details of the DTD s can be found here There are accounts and descriptions available of the gutpoems1 dtd and the gutbook1 dtd Doing the inital markup Most e texts have line breaks at the end of a line and double line breaks before and after a major structural division For example here is the end of one poem and the begining of another poem As far surpassing other common villains As Thou in natural parts has given me more Tarbolton Lasses The If ye gae up to yon hill tap Ye ll there see bonie Peggy She kens her father is a laird And she forsooth s a leddy There Sophy tight a lassie bright Besides a handsome fortune Wha canna win her in a night Has little art in courtin If we were using the poemsfrag dtd we would want to preserve all the lines so we could use the F ind and Replace function of EditPad to replace n this is how you define a new line in EditPad with line n line This is what you will see As far surpassing other common villains line line As Thou in natural parts has given me more line line line line Tarbolton Lasses The line line line line If ye gae up to yon hill tap line line Ye ll there see bonie Peggy line line She kens her father is a laird line line And she forsooth s a leddy line line line line There Sophy tight a lassie bright line line Besides a handsome fortune line line Wha canna win her in a night line line Has little art in courtin line line line line Move the last line to the top and again use the F ind and Replace function to replace line line with verse n n verse This is what we will get line As far surpassing other common villains line line As Thou in natural parts has given me more line verse verse line Tarbolton Lasses The line verse verse line If ye gae up to yon hill tap line line Ye ll there see bonie Peggy line line She kens her father is a laird line line And she forsooth s a leddy line verse verse line There Sophy tight a lassie bright line line Besides a handsome fortune line line Wha canna win her in a night line line Has little art in courtin line verse verse Again move the last verse to the top Now we have all our basic markup Although we have only been using a small fragment here the ammount of effort is the same whether we are marking up 2 or a 100 poems In poetry of course the individual lines are important in a book they are not and we would probably just look for a double line break n n and replace it with n para n n para n which would divide our initial text up into para elements

    Original URL path: http://gutenberg.hwg.org/markupXML.html (2016-02-14)
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  • The HTML Writers Guild Project Gutenberg. Using XHTML for markup 2.
    chapter or the opening Gutblurb Suggested classes Before reading this section you may want to read the page on The parts of a book Marking up meta information It is probably best to put the meta information in a single pre tag Increase the granularity by enclosing the sections in the following div class elements Classes for meta information Class Attribute value Description class gutblurb Use this to enclose the whole of the gutblurb meta material class endgutblurb This is for all the meta material at the end of the document class revhist Use this to enclose all the matter pertaining to the markup of a document including all the revision history This should come right after the opening Gutenberg blurb class comment Use this to enclose a comment in the body of the text this can be rendered invisible by the style sheet You can if you wish enclose a link element to link it to another footnote Note that this is accomplished in XML by using an idref type of attribute class endmrkup Here you can put any footnotes or comments that are refered to from the body of the document Also any notes on interpretation belong here class footnote To identify the footnotes class misc Any miscellaneous markup that does not easily fit into another category Marking up the document First mark off the whole book class book Make sure that this div encloses the whole of the book It is often a good idea to put a comment with the closing div tags to identify which section they are closing Now divide the book up into front matter body and back matter Frontmatter The following are suggested classes to use for enclosing front matter class frontmatter Make sure that this div encloses the whole of the front matter It is often a good idea to put a comment with the closing div tags to identify which section they are closing class half title The half title page class titlepage The title page class author Use to identify the author or authors class copyright Use to enclose the materials in the copyright page class dedication The dedication class epigraph An epigraph class toc The table of contents you can if you wish increase the granularity of markup by defining your own classes Most markers will just use the regular list elements Use ul in preference to ol class loi A List of illustrations class lot A list of tables class lom A list of maps class foreward The foreward class preface The preface and or acknowledgements class intro the introduction class frontmisc misceleneous matter It is often a good idea to enclose a user defined class describing the type or a comment The comment can be retrieved using XML tools class loa A List of abbreviations The document text The following are suggested classes to use for marking up the body of the book class bookbody Use this to enclose the entire body of the book class

    Original URL path: http://gutenberg.hwg.org/markupXHTML2.html (2016-02-14)
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  • The HTML Writers Guild Project Gutenberg TEI DTD Intro
    designed to enforce a certain structure on the author The TEI DTD was designed for marking up any existing document in any language in order to facilitate their analysis For this reason it has a very loose structure and uses generic section dividers to seperate out sections of documents Furthermore it was originally written when computing and storage resources were at much more of a premium than they are today so the tag names tend to be a little terse and not very intuitive However in defense of TEI the original TEI DTD allowed for renaming of the elements to suit the taste and language of the author The teixlite DTD does not allow this The full TEI DTD is a huge DTD and the official documentation runs to over 1400 pages However it is possible to do useful work with this DTD using a much smaller sub set and the following pages provide a brief tutorial that is designed to give you enough to mark up your first prose or poetry book using the XML version of this DTD the teixlite dtd Hopefully the following pages can also be used as an introduction for those wishing to learn the

    Original URL path: http://gutenberg.hwg.org/teidtds.html (2016-02-14)
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  • The HTML Writers Guild Project Gutenberg TEI DTD 8
    will use are the three obligatory elements and one optional element notesStmt of fileDesc The elements are titleStmt publicationStmt notesStmt and sourceDesc They must appear in this order teiHeader fileDesc titleStmt titleStmt publicationStmt publicationStmt notesStmt notesStmt sourceDesc sourceDesc fileDesc teiHeader In the titleStmt element we put the book title and author using the proper elements to contain them as follows titleStmt title The Riders of the Purple Sage title author Zane Grey author titleStmt In the publicationStmt element we will put all the Gutenberg blurb Note that it must all go in p elements publicationStmt p Project Gutenberg s Etext of Riders of the Purple Sage by Grey 8 in our series by Zane Grey p p Copyright laws are changing all over the world etc p publicationStmt The notesStmt element is a convienient place to put the acknowledgements to the volunters marking up the texts Note that the text is contained in a note element notesStmt note A Production of Project Gutenberg and the HTML Writers Guild Etext prepared by Bill Brewer billbrewer ttu edu Markup by Frank Boumphrey March 2000 note notesStmt In the sourceDesc element we put details of the source material Note that Unfortunately Gutenberg texts

    Original URL path: http://gutenberg.hwg.org/teidtds8.html (2016-02-14)
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