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  • IBARJ
    Restorative Justice Because of this network I am connected to statewide leaders who are shifting the way we see how we treat each other Thank you IBARJ for all you do Robert Spicer Culture and Climate Specialist Christian Fenger High School WHO WE ARE The Illinois Balanced and Restorative Justice Project IBARJ is a 501 c 3 organization that seeks to expand and sustain the availability of balanced and restorative justice practices and programs for citizens of Illinois through leadership education and promotion We are a vibrant network of professionals volunteers and organizations working locally regionally and statewide to create safer communities and schools support victims and improve pro social skills and positive outcomes for Illinois youth Our collaborative network includes leaders in juvenile justice schools social services corporations small businesses communities and faith based organizations Sign Up to Receive Our Newsletters and Announcements indicates required Email Address First Name Last Name WHAT S NEW WHAT WE DO Introduce the public to interventions that assist restoration of harm change delinquent behaviors and create safe communities Provide training in restorative justice RJ practices and sustain them with ongoing coaching and technical assistance Improve outcomes for youth who are involved with delinquency

    Original URL path: http://ibarji.org/ (2016-05-01)
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  • IBARJ
    the healing of the harm as much as possible The primary stakeholders in a given offense are 1 the person who caused the harm typically referred to as the offender 2 the person who was harmed referred to as the victim and 3 the community affected by the offense There are Five Essential Characteristics of successful restorative practices RELATIONSHIPS Developing caring connections and finding common ground RESPECT Listening to others opinions and valuing them RESPONSIBILITY Being accountable for actions taken RESTORATION Repairing harm that has been caused REINTEGRATION Ensuring all remain included and involved Four Important Elements are found in restorative practices Encounter Creates an opportunity for all to meet to discuss what happened and the harm caused Amends Expects those who have harmed to take steps to repair the harm done to others Reintegration Seeks to restore everyone to whole contributing members of society Inclusion Provides opportunities for all to collaborate in creating a resolution The best outcome from restorative justice practices happens when all stakeholders are actively involved and have a voice in the process Restorative Justice in Communities In the community restorative justice practices can be diversions from typical justice system responses i e court probation etc providing an opportunity for the stakeholders to focus on the harm caused and the needs and obligations of those involved Balanced and Restorative Justice BARJ is found within the Juvenile Justice System and takes Restorative Justice one step further suggesting that there are three components to the Balanced Approach Accountability Competency Development and Community Safety Accountability suggests that the youthful offender has an obligation to the person harmed to make amends competency development increases the expectation that the youthful offender leaves the juvenile justice system more capable than when entering it and community safety reflects the various partnerships in the community that support the youth while providing a continuum of sanctions to reduce recidivism BARJ practices in communities often create opportunities for transformation where youth realize their responsibility and successfully complete outcomes requested These can include sincere apologies restitution and community service all of which lead to higher victim and community satisfaction and lower recidivism rates RJ practices in communities Restorative justice practices Peacemaking Circles Restorative Group Conferences Restorative Peer Juries Victim Impact Panels Restorative Practices in Schools Zero tolerance policies became widespread in 1994 after federal legislation required states to expel for one year any student who brought a firearm to school or lose all federal funding It was not long before the results were showing this to be a seriously flawed practice Every year over three million children drop out of school When students are suspended and expelled from school for misbehavior they get farther behind in their studies They have not learned correct behavior nor have they appropriately been held accountable for their behavior Teachers who are frustrated with growing violence in schools report they do not know what to do other than eliminating what to many schools seems like a problem to be eliminated Restorative practices

    Original URL path: http://ibarji.org/communities.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • IBARJ
    parties are brought together by a trained facilitator to discuss how they and others have been harmed and how that harm might be repaired Participation by all involved is voluntary To participate the offender must first admit to the offense The facilitator contacts the offender first If the conference is possible then the facilitator contacts the harmed person to explain the process and invites them to the conference The facilitator also asks them to identify key members of their support systems who will be invited to participate as well Conferencing was developed from the Maori tradition in New Zealand where it is currently used for almost all juvenile offenses In the United States it is practiced by police departments communities and schools In communities it can be used as a diversion from the court system or after adjudication In schools it can be used as an alternative to suspension and expulsion While it is appropriate for both adults and youth it is primarily used with youth as a diversion in Illinois Community Service and Restitution Community Service and Restitution are frequent consequences of Restorative Justice Practices Data from Illinois have shown that youth who have been involved in an RJ practice are much more likely to complete Community Service and pay Restitution Some counties have reported payment of restitution as high as 100 when using restorative practices while others have data reporting in the 90 100 range In addition a study by the National Center for Juvenile Justice found juveniles who agreed to pay restitution as an informal disposition as well as those formally ordered to pay restitution returned to court significantly less often than juveniles who did not pay restitution OJJDP 1992 Just as neighborhoods and communities are harmed by criminal and delinquent activities they can be at least partially restored by meaningful service that contributes to their improvement Community Service offers one way in which an offender can be held accountable to repair some of the harms to the community caused by his or her actions It assists young offenders in building relationships with members of the community and to feel a greater sense of belonging in that community Community Service and Restitution are used in almost all counties in Illinois They are sometimes used as a court function and overseen by probation A goal of Community Service is to help offenders understand the harm they have caused to the community and to give them the opportunity to repair that harm in some way Paying Restitution enables youth to understand the needs and obligations involved when harm is committed Examples of community service include public work programs that beautify a community s environment such as a park roadside cleanup efforts or graffiti removal Community Service in a restorative setting offers crime victims the opportunity to provide input into the types of community service they would like to see the offender perform including activities that directly benefit the victim or a charity or project of the victim s choice

    Original URL path: http://ibarji.org/communities_RJPractices.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • IBARJ
    Blogs Inside Illinois IIRP Circle Space org Feedburner Practices In Communities In Schools Resources Data Evaluation RJ in the News Library Newsletters Related Organizations Quotes Events Videos Services Provided Contact Us About Us Mission Vision Values Board Members History What s Happening in Illinois IL County Map Legend Find IBARJ locations throughout Illinois by using our interactive map Click on any of the counties to quickly find all of our

    Original URL path: http://ibarji.org/findus.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • IBARJ
    with growing violence in schools report they do not know what to do other than eliminating what to many schools seems like a problem to be eliminated Restorative practices in schools inspired by the philosophy and practices of restorative justice prioritizes repairing harm done to relationships over the need for assigning blame and dispensing punishment Based in indigenous wisdom and modern restorative justice philosophy Restorative Practices increase accountability and both student and teacher satisfaction while using such events as a natural opportunity to promote social and emotional learning positive youth development and cognitive psychology According to Belinda Hopkins author of Just Schools A Whole School Approach to Restorative Justice A whole school approach to using restorative practices contributes to Happier and safer schools Mutually respectful relationships More effective teaching and learning Reducing exclusion and Raising attendance The restorative approach is based on the belief that the people best placed to resolve a conflict or a problem are the people directly involved and that imposed solutions are less effective less educative and possibly less likely to be honored In order to engage in a restorative approach to conflict and challenging behavior people need certain attitudes and skills Skills based training can develop both restorative skills and attitudes In Chicago Manley Career Academy High School and Christian Fenger Academy High School are both examples of high schools that have made a difference in a few short years by using restorative practices to reduce violence while lowering suspension and expulsion rates Click above to read about their successes with restorative practices Restorative Practices in Schools policies in Illinois Senate Bill 100 recently passed by both the Illinois House and Senate with broad bipartisan support represents the strongest and most comprehensive effort ever made by a state to address the causes and consequences of

    Original URL path: http://ibarji.org/schools.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • IBARJ
    of emotions deeper listening thoughtful reflection and an unrushed pace and is important in creating a safe space and an invitation for people who find it difficult to speak in a group In schools Peacemaking Circes can be used for creating culture change and reducing violence and bullying in schools as well as following inappropriate student behavior Restorative Group Conferences in Schools Also called Family Group Conferences Accountability Conferences Restorative Conferences involve the community of people most affected by the offense the harmed the harmer and the family friends and key supporters of both in deciding the resolution of a criminal incident These affected parties are brought together by a trained facilitator to discuss how they and others have been harmed and how that harm might be repaired Participation by all involved is voluntary To participate the offender must first admit to the offense The facilitator contacts the offender first If the conference is possible then the facilitator contacts the harmed person to explain the process and invites them to the conference The facilitator also asks them to identify key members of their support systems who will be invited to participate as well Conferencing was developed from the Maori tradition in New Zealand where it is currently used for almost all juvenile offenses In the United States it is practiced by police departments communities and schools In communities it can be used as a diversion from the court system or after adjudication In schools it can be used as an alternative to suspension and expulsion While it is appropriate for both adults and youth it is primarily used with youth as a diversion in Illinois Peer Juries Peer Juries found in both school and community settings typically incorporate a combination of Conferencing and Circles Peer Juries unlike Youth Courts are not intended to resemble courtroom settings Peer Jurors are youth who work with young offenders their victims and their community to repair harm build competencies and create safer communities They usually deal with minor delinquent and status offenses and other problem behaviors Normally an adult advisor sits in the room with the Peer Jurors to oversee the proceedings but does not participate Peer Jury programs require youth to admit guilt prior to participation In communities Peer Juries are used as a diversion from the court system Following a successful completion of the agreement the young offender s legal charges are typically dismissed Agencies operating and administering Peer Jury programs include juvenile courts juvenile probation departments law enforcement nonprofit organizations and schools Peer Juries in schools are similar to those in communities in that referred youth attend the Peer Jury after committing an offense typically referred by an administrator to avoid suspension or other disciplinary sanctions by completing a contract to repair the harm caused Community Service and Restitution Community Service and Restitution are frequent consequences of Restorative Justice Practices Data from Illinois have shown that youth who have been involved in an RJ practice are much more likely to complete

    Original URL path: http://ibarji.org/schools_RJPractices.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • IBARJ
    led initiative in the south suburbs For more information please contact Sally Wolf sallywolf ibarj org Adler School of Psychology In 2011 2012 the Illinois BARJ Project IBARJP collaborated with the Institute on Public Safety and Social Justice IPSSJ at the Adler School of Professional Psychology to conduct a study on urban systems of restorative justice IBARJP representatives surveyed agencies and schools throughout Cook County that currently implement restorative programs and practices to learn about their organizational histories active initiatives and collaborations with other restorative practitioners Meanwhile the IPSSJ collected data on restorative programs in Vancouver British Columbia Canada so as to compare its system of restorative justice practitioners to the one in Cook County The overall purpose of the study was to collect valuable information on local applications of restorative justice to share with policymakers educators and the general public This new information is meant to encourage both mainstream awareness and increased systemic implementation of restorative justice in Cook County and beyond The findings of this collaborative study have been summarized and assessed in a white paper written by the IPSSJ Click here for the full report https docs google com file d 0B0x1NZf3DQUZNEo5ejduWmpfUUk edit pli 1 Additionally this information can be found in our Cook County map For more information please contact Sara Balgoyen sarab ibarj org Alton Safe Schools Healthy Students Initiative IBARJP has been working with the director of the Alton Safe Schools Healthy Students Initiative to bring restorative practices to the Alton community and school district since 2010 The Alton School District No 11 has been incorporating restorative practices Circles into their universal approach through Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports PBIS This is bringing circles into classrooms across the district as a way to improve relationships establish expectations resolve conflict and much more Additionally the community is working on incorporating restorative practices into their police diversion program for youth and IBARJP is supporting this work For more information please contact Sandy Crawford scrawford altonschools org AmeriCorps VISTA Since 2011 IBARJP has hosted a full time volunteer through the AmeriCorps Volunteers In Service To America VISTA program VISTA volunteers serve one year terms at nonprofit organizations across the country with the mission of reducing poverty and its effects on individuals and communities The duty of a VISTA is to support the capacity building and sustainability efforts of his or her host organization IBARJP is now hosting its VISTA Shaniqua Jones as part of the Stone Soup Project For more information please contact Marie Goff crawalavip mail gmail com director of the hosting site Cra Wa La VIP Champaign Urbana Area Project The Champaign Urbana Area Project is a community organization dedicated to providing services to at risk youth and their families Since 2011 the Champaign Urbana Area Project has implemented a Restorative Justice Initiative to establish and strengthen restorative justice practices in the Champaign Urbana community and its schools Through this initiative the Champaign Urbana Area Project has helped to sustain the Peer Jury Program at

    Original URL path: http://ibarji.org/collaborations.asp (2016-05-01)
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  • IBARJ
    IBARJ Projects and Collaborations What s Happening in Illinois Blogs Inside Illinois IIRP Circle Space org Feedburner Practices In Communities In Schools Resources Data Evaluation RJ in the News Library Newsletters Related Organizations Quotes Events Videos Services Provided Contact Us About Us Mission Vision Values Board Members History Practices Peacemaking Circles Community Panels Community Service Peer Juries Restitution Restorative Group Conferencing Restorative Practices in Schools Victim Impact Classes Victim Impact

    Original URL path: http://ibarji.org/practices.asp (2016-05-01)
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