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  • Regional Fisheries Bodies Information Exchange Position Statements Educate IGFA School of Sportfishing Observer Training IGFA Junior Anglers Fishing Summer Camp Education and Outreach Programs Release Recommendations Education Staff Volunteer Opportunities Resources Videos PHOTO GALLERY IGFA Publications E Newsletters Species Database Captains and Guides IGFA Mobile Weigh Stations Support Join or Renew Make a Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Bass kelp calico Paralabrax clathratus Girard 1854 SERRANIDAE FAMILY also called calico bass California kelp bass rock bass sand bass bull bass kelp salmon cabrilla The kelp bass is common along the central and southern California coast and northeastern Baja and ranges from the Columbia River Washington to Magdalena Bay Baja California It is usually found in or near kelp beds over reefs around rock jetties and breakwaters or structures in shallow water and to about 150 ft 46 m While it is found throughout the water column larger specimens usually occur in deeper waters The kelp bass a member of a large group of seabasses which inhabit the eastern Pacific is a robust fish with a typical well known bass shape Most anglers in its territory readily recognize the kelp bass as it is one of the most important targets among southern California s light tackle anglers The color of is brown to olive green with pale blotches on the back becoming lighter below They are easily be distinguished from the sand basses by the fact that the third fourth and fifth dorsal spines are about the same length whereas the third dorsal spine of the sand basses is much longer than the fourth and fifth Because it is considered to be among the best eating fish and a powerful fighter it is highly sought by sport fishermen An omnivorous feeder

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/species/85-bass-kelp-calico.aspx?CommonName=85-bass-kelp-calico.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • Fishing Summer Camp Education and Outreach Programs Release Recommendations Education Staff Volunteer Opportunities Resources Videos PHOTO GALLERY IGFA Publications E Newsletters Species Database Captains and Guides IGFA Mobile Weigh Stations Support Join or Renew Make a Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Bass largemouth Micropterus salmoides Lacepede 1802 CENTRARCHIDAE FAMILY also called black bass Oswego bass green bass green trout Florida bass Florida or southern largemouth northern largemouth Originally confined primarily to the eastern United States of American and portions of northern Mexico and southern Canada this member of the sunfish family can be found in every state in the U S A throughout Mexico and Central America and in many other countries throughout the world The largemouth bass very closely resembles the smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu and other species of the genus Micropterus i e spotted bass redeye bass etc Together these fishes form a group that is referred to as the black basses The largemouth can be distinguished from most similar species by the fact that its mouth extends at least to and often beyond the rear edge of the eyes Also its first and second dorsal fins are almost separated by an obvious deep dip and there are no scales on the soft rayed second dorsal fin These characters are equally true of the Florida largemouth bass and the northern largemouth bass In all other species of Micropterus the mouth does not extend to the back of the eyes the two dorsal fins are clearly connected usually with a slight dip between them and the scales overlap the base portion of the second dorsal fin They are the most popular freshwater game fish Much of its popularity is due to its pugnacious attitude and willingness to strike a

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/species/86-bass-largemouth.aspx?CommonName=86-bass-largemouth.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • Questions and Answers SCALES AND CERTIFICATION Slam and Trophy Clubs Conserve Our Work FISHERIES RESEARCH MANAGEMENT IGFA Great Marlin Race Billfish Conservation Act Conservation News Resources Socioeconomic Resources Regional Fisheries Bodies Information Exchange Position Statements Educate IGFA School of Sportfishing Observer Training IGFA Junior Anglers Fishing Summer Camp Education and Outreach Programs Release Recommendations Education Staff Volunteer Opportunities Resources Videos PHOTO GALLERY IGFA Publications E Newsletters Species Database Captains and Guides IGFA Mobile Weigh Stations Support Join or Renew Make a Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Bass rock Ambloplites rupestris Rafinesque 1817 CENTRARCHIDAE FAMILY also called black perch goggle eye red eye rock sunfish Native to the northeastern U S A and southeastern Canada from Ontario and Quebec southward through the Great Lakes region as far as Tennessee an possibly Alabama Rock bass have also been introduced into other states including some western states They prefer small cool weedy lakes and streams and the outer edges of larger lakes always over rocky bottoms hence the name rock bass where no silt is present turbidity is low and cover is extensive They are scrappy fighters but tire quickly The flesh is firm white and makes excellent eating This is a large and robust sunfish that looks like a cross between a bluegill and one of the black basses Its body is less compressed than most sunfishes of the genus Lepomis including the bluegill and longer in profile It has been known to reach 3 lb 1 36 kg but the more common size is about 8 oz 226 g There is a black spot at the edge of the gill cover The mouth is larger and more basslike than in most small sunfishes the upper jaw reaching beyond the beginning of

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/species/87-bass-rock.aspx?CommonName=87-bass-rock.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • Mobile Weigh Stations Support Join or Renew Make a Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Bass shoal Micropterus cataractae CENTRARCHIDAE FAMILY The shoal bass occurs in the Apalachicola Chattahoochee and Flint river drainages of Alabama Florida and Georgia It has been introduced and is now established in the Altamaha River drainages in central Georgia It inhabits shoal areas of rivers and large creeks throughout its range Over the past 40 years the shoal bass has been referred to as the Redeye Bass M coosae as an undescribed subspecies or variety of the Redeye Bass or as an undescribed species In a paper written by James D Williams and George H Burgess A New Species of Bass Micropterus cataractae the confusion was finally clarified After examining the records for the Redeye Bass at IGFA it was determined that all of the existing records are Shoal Bass Micropterus cataractae All of the Redeye Bass records have been transferred to the new designation of Shoal Bass The Shoal Bass coloration is olive green to dark olive to almost black a dusky to black blotch is present on the posterior portion of the opercle and another one right before the tail Three diagonal dark lines are present laterally on the head The iris is typically bright red Although the Shoal Bass has been most often confused with the Redeye Bass it is most similar to the Spotted Bass M punctulatus It differs from the Spotted Bass by the absence of teeth on its tongue The Shoal Bass also has more lateral lines scales usually 67 81 not 59 to 70 more rows of scales above usually 8 to 10 not 6 to 9 and below usually 15 to 21 not 12 to 15 the lateral

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/species/88-bass-shoal.aspx?CommonName=88-bass-shoal.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • Captains and Guides IGFA Mobile Weigh Stations Support Join or Renew Make a Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Bass smallmouth Micropterus dolomieu 1802 CENTRARCHIDAE FAMILY also call black bass The smallmouth bass is native to the eastern half of the U S A and southeastern Canada from Manitoba and Quebec south to the Tennessee River system in Alabama and west to eastern Oklahoma It has been widely transplanted so that today it occurs in almost every state and many other countries It is not as widespread as the largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides The smallmouth bass is the second largest member of the sunfish family Centrarchidae attaining a weight of almost 12 lb 5 45 kg Only the largemouth bass which reaches a weight of over 20 lb 9 08 kg is heavier The smallmouth is easily distinguished from the largemouth by its clearly connected dorsal fins the scales on the base portion of the soft rayed second dorsal fin and the upper jaw bone which extends only to about the middle of the eye The coloration is also distinctive being usually more brownish in the smallmouth and more greenish in the largemouth The smallmouth also has faint bars on the body prominent in the young while the largemouth has a fairly wide streak of oval or diamond shaped markings or blotches down the midline of the sides In either species the colors may vary and the markings may be inconspicuous or absent in individuals based on time of year and various biological factors Generally the smallmouth has bars radiating back from the eyes and though similar bars may be present in individuals of other species including the largemouth they seem to be more prominent and more consistently present in the

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/species/89-bass-smallmouth.aspx?CommonName=89-bass-smallmouth.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • IGFA Mobile Weigh Stations Support Join or Renew Make a Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Bass spotted Micropterus punctulatus Rafinesque 1819 CENTRARCHIDAE FAMILY also called Kentucky bass Kentucky spotted bass northern spotted bass Alabama spotted bass Wichita spotted bass black bass There are three recognized subspecies of the spotted bass the northern spotted bass Micropterus punctulatus punctulatus the Alabama spotted bass Micropterus p henshalli and the Wichita spotted bass Micropterus p wichitae spotted bass can be found throughout the central and lower Mississippi basin to the Gulf of Mexico from Texas to the Florida panhandle including Georgia Alabama Tennessee Kentucky and other nearby states where it occurs naturally or has been introduced The Wichita spotted bass appears to be limited to the West Cache Creek Oklahoma The Alabama spotted bass has been introduced into California Many anglers who catch a spotted bass believe they have caught a largemouth bass M salmoides undoubtedly because the coloration is similar both having a greenish hue and a broad stripe of diamonds or blotches along the midline of the body The spotted bass like all black basses except the largemouth has scales on the base portion of the second dorsal fin its first and second dorsal fin are clearly connected and its upper jaw bone does not extend back to or beyond the rear edge of the eyes The spotted bass is also often confused with the smallmouth bass M dolomieu but it lacks the vertical bars that are present on the sides of the body in the smallmouth The spotted bass also has small black spots below the lateral line the rear edges of certain scales are black unlike either the largemouth or the smallmouth Juveniles of the species resemble the young of

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/species/90-bass-spotted.aspx?CommonName=90-bass-spotted.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • also called striper rock rockfish squid hound greenhead The striped bass or rockfish as it is known in North and South Carolina occurs from the St Lawrence River to northern Florida on the Atlantic coast of the United States off Florida Louisiana Alabama and Mississippi in the Gulf of Mexico and along the U S Pacific coast from Washington to California Striped bass were unknown on the Pacific coast until they were introduced there in 1879 and 1882 On the east coast they have been well known to saltwater anglers and one of the most important food fishes since at least the early 1600 s In saltwater the striped bass is anadromous and migratory Some migrate from North Carolina Virginia or Maryland to more northern climates in the summer and return when the summer season is over Others remain non migratory within estuarine river systems such as the St Lawrence the Santee Cooper or the Savannah To most freshwater anglers this very important game fish is relatively new The species moves far upstream in rivers during spawning migrations It has a native range in freshwater from the St Lawrence River N Y south to St John s River Florida and also from the Suwannee River in Florida to Lake Pontchartrain in Louisiana In some of these waters populations have become landlocked due to artificial impoundments that blocked their return to the sea In recent years striped bass have been introduced into freshwater systems in most of the states The striped bass closest freshwater relatives are the white bass Morone chrysops the yellow bass M mississippiensis and the white perch M americana The striped bass is easily recognized by the 7 or 8 prominent black stripes that run along the scale rows on each side of its long sleek silvery body

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/species/91-bass-striped.aspx?CommonName=91-bass-striped.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • Become a Corporate Partner Career Opportunities Fish World Records World Record Application Angling Rules International Angling Rules Release Rules Catch Certificates Fishing Tips and Tactics IGFA Member Discounts IGFA Rules Questions and Answers SCALES AND CERTIFICATION Slam and Trophy Clubs Conserve Our Work FISHERIES RESEARCH MANAGEMENT IGFA Great Marlin Race Billfish Conservation Act Conservation News Resources Socioeconomic Resources Regional Fisheries Bodies Information Exchange Position Statements Educate IGFA School of Sportfishing Observer Training IGFA Junior Anglers Fishing Summer Camp Education and Outreach Programs Release Recommendations Education Staff Volunteer Opportunities Resources Videos PHOTO GALLERY IGFA Publications E Newsletters Species Database Captains and Guides IGFA Mobile Weigh Stations Support Join or Renew Make a Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Bass white Morone chrysops Rafinesque 1820 MORONIDAE FAMILY White bass are widely distributed throughout river systems of the Mississippi and Ohio valleys and the Great Lakes They are native from the St Lawrence River in the east to Lake Winnipeg in the north and to the Rio Grande in the west Most abundant in clear lakes and reservoirs they have been transplanted into the systems of various states including California They are an excellent light tackle fish that will take a bait or lure readily The white bass looks quite a bit like a shortened version of its larger relative the striped bass Morone saxatilis It has the same silvery white sides and black stripes It differs most noticeably in being shorter and stockier with a smaller head and the dorsal fins are set closer together They can be distinguished from the yellow bass M mississippiensis by its more silvery color and regular unbroken stripes as well as by its protruding pugnacious looking basslike lower jaw in the yellow bass the jaws are about

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/species/92-bass-white.aspx?CommonName=92-bass-white.aspx (2016-02-11)
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