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  • Tackle Gil Keech Heavy Tackle Conservation Award IGFA Chester H Wolfe Outstanding Sportsmanship Award IGFA International Committee of Representatives Partners Corporate Partners Become a Corporate Partner Career Opportunities Fish World Records World Record Application Angling Rules International Angling Rules Release Rules Catch Certificates Fishing Tips and Tactics IGFA Member Discounts IGFA Rules Questions and Answers SCALES AND CERTIFICATION Slam and Trophy Clubs Conserve Our Work FISHERIES RESEARCH MANAGEMENT IGFA Great Marlin Race Billfish Conservation Act Conservation News Resources Socioeconomic Resources Regional Fisheries Bodies Information Exchange Position Statements Educate IGFA School of Sportfishing Observer Training IGFA Junior Anglers Fishing Summer Camp Education and Outreach Programs Release Recommendations Education Staff Volunteer Opportunities Resources Videos PHOTO GALLERY IGFA Publications E Newsletters Species Database Captains and Guides IGFA Mobile Weigh Stations Support Join or Renew Make a Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Bass whiterock Morone saxatilis x M chrysops MORONIDAE FAMILY also called sunshine bass Florida hybrid bass The whiterock bass is a hybrid produced by a female striped bass Morone saxatilis and a male white bass Morone chrysops In Florida the sunshine bass is the reverse cross of the same two species and the two are therefore the same hybrid Hybrids are not given their own scientific names but are designated by the names of the two parent species The whiterock or sunshine bass looks like a stocky striped bass It can be distinguished from its larger parent primarily by this shorter stockier body and by the interrupted or broken stripes on the sides The interrupted lines will also distinguish it from its smaller parent the white bass as well its size in many cases It has been widely stocked in the lakes of various states providing a new challenge for the angler

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/species/93-bass-whiterock.aspx?CommonName=93-bass-whiterock.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • Tackle Conservation Award IGFA Chester H Wolfe Outstanding Sportsmanship Award IGFA International Committee of Representatives Partners Corporate Partners Become a Corporate Partner Career Opportunities Fish World Records World Record Application Angling Rules International Angling Rules Release Rules Catch Certificates Fishing Tips and Tactics IGFA Member Discounts IGFA Rules Questions and Answers SCALES AND CERTIFICATION Slam and Trophy Clubs Conserve Our Work FISHERIES RESEARCH MANAGEMENT IGFA Great Marlin Race Billfish Conservation Act Conservation News Resources Socioeconomic Resources Regional Fisheries Bodies Information Exchange Position Statements Educate IGFA School of Sportfishing Observer Training IGFA Junior Anglers Fishing Summer Camp Education and Outreach Programs Release Recommendations Education Staff Volunteer Opportunities Resources Videos PHOTO GALLERY IGFA Publications E Newsletters Species Database Captains and Guides IGFA Mobile Weigh Stations Support Join or Renew Make a Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Bass yellow Morone mississippiensis Jordan and Eigenmann 1887 MORONIDAE FAMILY also called barfish brassy bass stripe striped bass erroneously streaker The yellow bass can be found in quiet pools and backwaters of large streams lakes and reservoirs from Minnesota Wisconsin and Michigan south to Louisiana eastern Texas and the lower Coosa and Mobile Bay drainages It is relatively confined to the central Mississippi Valley area and has not been extensively transplanted though it has been introduced to some degree into other areas of the states within its native range as well as Arizona The yellow bass resembles its close relative the white bass Morone chrysops but can be recognized by its golden yellow sides and more irregular stripes of the 6 7 stripes the 3 4 that lie below the lateral line are broken or interrupted toward the tail The yellow bass is a scrappy fighter and a popular species among light tackle and panfish anglers

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/species/94-bass-yellow.aspx?CommonName=94-bass-yellow.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • Opportunities Fish World Records World Record Application Angling Rules International Angling Rules Release Rules Catch Certificates Fishing Tips and Tactics IGFA Member Discounts IGFA Rules Questions and Answers SCALES AND CERTIFICATION Slam and Trophy Clubs Conserve Our Work FISHERIES RESEARCH MANAGEMENT IGFA Great Marlin Race Billfish Conservation Act Conservation News Resources Socioeconomic Resources Regional Fisheries Bodies Information Exchange Position Statements Educate IGFA School of Sportfishing Observer Training IGFA Junior Anglers Fishing Summer Camp Education and Outreach Programs Release Recommendations Education Staff Volunteer Opportunities Resources Videos PHOTO GALLERY IGFA Publications E Newsletters Species Database Captains and Guides IGFA Mobile Weigh Stations Support Join or Renew Make a Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix Linnaeus 1766 POMATOMIDAE FAMILY also called blue tailor elf chopper marine piranha rock salmon snapper blue Hatteras blue Found worldwide including the Mediterranean and Black Seas in temperate to tropical waters although sporadic in occurrence and location The bluefish is one of only three species of the family Pomatomidae The mouth has extremely sharp teeth The existence of a spine in the second dorsal fin the absence of head markings and the lack of an interspace between the dorsal fins distinguish the bluefish from the similar looking greater amberjack Seriola dumerili The bluefish s lack of finlets immediately distinguishes it from the mackerels The voracious bluefish richly deserves the nicknames marine piranha and chopper because it swims in large schools through shoals of bait fish slashing and destroying everything in its path They will bite anything including unlucky swimmers Bluefish can easily inflict serious wounds even when the fish is out of water as many a careless fisherman has learned Some anglers sniff out bluefish by their smell which is something like fresh cucumbers Fishing methods

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/species/95-bluefish.aspx?CommonName=95-bluefish.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • IGFA | Sir Garrick Agnew
    Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Sir Garrick Agnew Click here for more IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame videos 1930 1987 2003 Inductee Born and educated in Perth Australia Sir Garrick Agnew honed his impressive post graduate business skills at Harvard University s School of Business Administration Returning to Australia he created a firm of ore brokers ship charterers and operators which later became Agnew Clough Limited Sir Garrick was instrumental in the establishment of one of Australia s four major iron ore producers in 1970 pioneered the solar salt industry in Australia and formed and later became Chairman of Australian Bank Limited He was a board member of Quantas Airways and the Australian Industries Development Corporation For his remarkable contribution to Australian business he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II dubbed by Prince Charles in 1983 His sporting accomplishments are equally impressive Sir Garrick was a member of both the 1948 and 1953 Australian Olympic swimming teams winning a bronze medal and he won a gold medal in the 400 meter freestyle event at the 1950 Commonwealth then called Empire Games He also held the world record for the 1500 meter freestyle And when he took up the sport of big game fishing Sir Garrick Agnew did so with the same intensity that he put into competitive swimming and his business endeavors He was Western Australia s billfishing pioneer in 1968 he caught the first black marlin and later the first blue and striped marlin under IGFA rules and the second sailfish in Western Australian waters the first sailfish was captured just one day before In his boat Pannawonica he traveled an estimated 350 000 nautical miles pursuing big fish especially marlin while at the same time opening up new

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/Museum/HOF-Agnew.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • IGFA | Alan H. Anderson
    of fisheries especially of those species most desired by his own customers and other anglers in the Atlantic Al credits his mother with his love of the sport that s remained a constant throughout his life During school lunch break in Woodbridge New Jersey he and his mom would head to the river in the family s 1938 Plymouth It was there using a bent pin string and a stick that Al caught his first pumpkinseed fish Aunt Lillian and Uncle Harry also were big influences providing their nephew with quality tackle from the custom shop they ran from their basement and taking him striped bass fishing on northern New Jersey beaches At Fairleigh Dickinson University Al s fishing bug frequently interfered with his class schedule and he often showed up for biology in his waders carrying buckets of trout which he later filleted in the lab sink More than five decades ago when he was a graduate student at Adelphi University Anderson marked his first fish using a copper wire tag he devised and he was fascinated when over the next three years he caught the same largemouth bass several times While working on his doctorate at the University of Rhode Island he began to fish salt water In 1967 Al marked his first striped bass for the American Littoral Society and has since become the ALS s most prolific and successful tagger with almost 51 000 game fish That same year he met Frank Mather founder of the bluefin tagging program at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and began tagging tuna for him In the late 1960s Anderson was charter fishing part time aboard the Prowler out of Wakefield Rhode Island in the early 1980s after a 20 year teaching career charter fishing became Al s full time vocation Through the years Anderson has faced critics of his conservation beliefs but has remained resolute about tagging not only tuna and striped bass but also marlin sharks and bottom fish According to the National Marine Fisheries Service he has tagged more Atlantic bluefin than anyone in the world He also has more recaptures critically important because recaptured tags provide valuable insight into migratory behavior life spans growth rates and population dynamics and lead to sound management decisions and regulations Anderson s marked bluefin have been recaptured in the Baltic Sea off the coast of France in the Straits of Gibraltar and off the shores of Corsica and Sicily shattering what scientists once believed about the species range In 1977 he began working with Jack Casey s NMFS Cooperative Shark Tagging Program and later with additional agencies tagging more than 57 000 blue and white marlin yellowfin longfin albacore and bigeye tuna mako porbeagle thresher and blue sharks codfish bluefish haddock sea bass fluke and blackfish tautog In 1989 Al won his first of 13 awards from AFTCO s Tag a Tuna for Tomorrow Program for bluefin yellowfin and bigeye and in 2011 was one of five selected from the

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/Museum/HOF-Anderson-A.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • IGFA | John W. Anderson II
    John W Anderson II was born his family moved from Pennsylvania to Michigan And it was in a Michigan lake on a bamboo fishing pole and a worm that young Jack landed his first catch That 4 pound smallmouth bass turned out to be the first of many trophies for a man who became well known for his consummate big game angling skill In the early 1930s the Anderson clan moved to Bermuda where Jack received a formalBritish education Upon graduation he enrolled at Yale University but less than a year later in the summer of 1942 he left college to enlist in the U S Army Air Force Jack Anderson distinguished himself during the war Recruited from the ranks by the Office of Strategic Services OSS he served in the European theater of operations in 1944 and 1945 He was released from the U S forces as a first lieutenant in September 1945 and returned to Yale graduating in 1947 Anderson quickly put his degree in International Relations to use at the family s steel tubing firm Bundy Corporation Over the next 45 years he channeled the firm into a multinational force While doing so he traveled to and fished all parts of the globe Angling flourished after World War II and Jack Anderson was in the forefront of this growth He was a regular in the Bahamas from 1947 where he often went bonefishing in the morning for the bait he would use to entice blue marlin in the afternoon In 1978 and 1983 off Australia s Great Barrier Reef Anderson made two remarkable catches a 1 318 lb black marlin landed in 57 minutes and a 1 307 lb fish taken in 47 minutes Jack Anderson is one of only two anglers to accomplish such a feat He s caught Atlantic blue marlin and bluefin tuna over 800 lb and Pacific blue marlin over 900 lb In fact Jack has made 10 to 1 catches of black marlin blue marlin striped marlin and Pacific sailfish something that few anglers achieve with even a single species Jack s father Wendell Anderson Sr possessed a love of sport fishing and of scientific inquiry and he satisfied both passions by funding two marine expeditions for Yale University s Bingham Oceanographic Laboratory and Peabody Museum The first in 1948 traveled to New Zealand the second five years later explored Ecuador and Peru Jack shared his father s interests With his knowledgeable scientific approach to big game angling and fascination with marine life and the world s oceans Jack was a naturalparticipant in the expeditions Also present were ichthyologists oceanographers technicians and other qualified personnel including the Andersons fishing captain Bill Fagen all of whom spent several months fishing and collecting specimens in these exotic locales The 1948 New Zealand trip was a coming home of sorts for Jack s father who had first visited the Bay of Islands and sampled its splendid striped marlin fishing as early as 1937 In 1956

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/Museum/HOF-Anderson.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • IGFA | Stuart C. Apte
    heroes At age 12 he landed his first tarpon and four years later he was fly fishing the same south Florida waters he s fished for more than 60 years All through military prep school and the University of Miami Apte split his time between studies fishing and golden gloves boxing developing a reputation in all three as a fierce competitor and a firebrand As a fighter pilot in the Korean conflict he flew some of the first jets and as a Pan Am pilot for 34 years he had the opportunity to pursue his fishing passion all over the world When he had time off Stu headed to the Florida Keys In the late 1950s he began guiding part time out of Little Torch Key then full time in 1960 after a Pan Am layoff The close knit fishing guide community based in Islamorada was cool to newcomers especially aggressive ones and looked on Apte as the pilot who thinks he s a guide So Stu went his own way Giant tarpon catches were rare and he was determined to change that Waking hours were spent fishing or preparing to fish devising new strategies techniques and gear He modified the blood knot and acquired an interest in an airplane so he could scout the flats The Stu Apte Tarpon Fly popular since 1958 was featured on a 1991 US Postal Service stamp Apte guided Joe Brooks often History was made in May 1961 when Brooks landed a world record tarpon aboard Apte s Mom s Worry at 148 lb it was the largest ever caught on fly In the mid 1960s when few women fly fished for tarpon and even fewer guides considered guiding a lady angler Apte led Kay Brodney to a 137 lb silver king For 50 years Apte fished with Ted Williams Ted taught him how to pole a boat and called him bush because he considered Apte s skills bush league compared to his own When Williams finally started calling him Stu Apte knew he had made it Stu could find the fish make them eat and land the big ones in record time and his name became synonymous with tarpon As word spread he developed a huge following by 1964 he was guiding 300 days a year and referring another 400 days to other guides He also set his own records more than 40 saltwater light tackle and fly rod world records in all including the two longest standing fly records a 58 lb dolphin 1964 and a 136 lb Pacific sailfish 1965 both on 12 lb tippet In 1967 Apte was the first to catch a tarpon over 150 lb on fly breaking Brooks record in the process He caught two record tarpon in one day in 1977 the second 82 lb on 6 lb tippet is the longest standing tarpon fly rod record on the IGFA books And one day in 1982 Apte set two 12 lb tarpon records one in the

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/Museum/HOF-Apte.aspx (2016-02-11)
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  • IGFA | Lord Robert S. S. Baden-Powell
    Fishing Summer Camp Education and Outreach Programs Release Recommendations Education Staff Volunteer Opportunities Resources Videos PHOTO GALLERY IGFA Publications E Newsletters Species Database Captains and Guides IGFA Mobile Weigh Stations Support Join or Renew Make a Gift Shop Upcoming Events Advertising Opportunities Contact Donor Opportunities Donor Societies Member Discounts Membership Benefits Lord Robert S S Baden Powell Click here for more IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame videos 1857 1941 2002 Inductee History books recognize Lord Robert Baden Powell for his military genius during the Boer Wars But to millions of people the Baden Powell name is synonymous with the Boy Scouts for he is the man credited with founding that worldwide movement in 1908 Drawing from favorite childhood activities Baden Powell began teaching what became the fundamentals of scouting camping observation tracking and survival skills to the young soldiers in his regiment in 1893 Returning to England in 1903 after his military service he discovered that the pamphlet he had written for the soldiers was being used to teach outdoor education by youth leaders and teachers all over the country Encouraged Baden Powell rewrote Aids to Scouting for a younger audience and the revised Scouting for Boys published in 1908 became the handbook of the new Boy Scout movement that spread quickly throughout the world Throughout his life Baden Powell was a passionate fly fisherman He practiced catch and release fishing nearly 50 years before it became widely accepted and as is obvious from his writings was a true believer in angling s powers of healing and the rejuvenating effects of time spent on the water He traveled extensively first in the military and later as Chief Scout And everywhere he went he fished Lord Baden Powell passed along these intense feelings about fishing in the Fishes and Fishing chapter

    Original URL path: https://www.igfa.org/Museum/HOF-Baden-Powell.aspx (2016-02-11)
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