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  • Mobile App for iOS and Android
    Courses Certificates Subscription Information Continuing Education and Certificates Sample Courses Curriculum Integration Practicum Cursos en Español Cursos em Português Open School Introduction IHI Open School Page Mobile App for iOS and Android Page Content Download the IHI Open School mobile app Now available for both Apple and Android devices Features Take the entire IHI Open School catalog of courses including the audio clips video interviews and post lesson assessment quizzes The courses cover quality improvement patient safety leadership patient and family centered care managing health care operations and population health Complete all the courses and earn a certificate that you can proudly display on your resume showing future employers you re passionate about improving systems and care for patients The courses are free for students residents faculty and users from the least developed countries Professionals can purchase a one year subscription or organizations can purchase training for a group Access a growing collection of tools and resources that complement the teaching from the courses Case studies improvement stories and glossaries provide additional learning opportunities for students and staff Watch an ever changing assortment of videos that highlight student achievements new ideas in health care and opinions from expert leaders in

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/IHIOpenSchool/Courses/Pages/MobileApp.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • Systems Change: With Innovation Grant and the Open School, Brody School of Medicine Changes Education
    harm for hypoglycemic patients at a system wide quality symposium in January of 2015 Originally Brody was planning on offering the Teachers of Quality Academy just once but may offer it again because interest is high among faculty who didn t get the chance to participate After exposure to the Open School modules faculty started using them with their students within courses and clerkships Faculty overseeing residents fellows and nursing students did the same thing At Brody that set the stage for an innovative longitudinal curriculum for all medical students Innovative Longitudinal Curriculum Completion of the Open School Basic Certificate was already approved as a requirement at Brody before the grant but Baxley saw this as an opportunity for deeper integration It s considerably more challenging logistically to embed the courses within an entire curriculum instead of just one course says Baxley We put some aspects of population health into Microbiology for example and patient centered care into our Doctoring course We thought it was important that it wasn t a set aside requirement Each Open School module is linked with a specific experiential learning activity kind of like a flipped classroom For example Students complete PS 101 Fundamentals of Patient Safety before they do a problem based learning case in which a medical error occurs Students have to recognize and identify the error and discuss the concept of systems that create error Students complete PS 104 Root Cause and Systems Analysis before they participate in a sample RCA that the health system partner Vidant Health helps run with them Students complete PS 105 Communicating with Patients after Adverse Events before they disclose an error during a standardized patient interview in their Doctoring course See Figure 1 for more detail about the curriculum The Open School courses are high quality material says Baxley In my experience they are the right length and have good clinical connections The modules are accessible online and you don t have to create them That s what makes it easy for other schools to pick them up And there s one other important reason Baxley wanted to use the courses Students she says really like them Taj A Nasser a second year medical student explained why The IHI modules have been very eye opening meaningful and interesting he says One of my favorites thus far has been QI 104 The Life Cycle of a Quality Improvement Project Viewing the big picture of a quality improvement project with a fascinating real life example allowed me to better grasp the essence of quality improvement Baxley and Lawson also worked with IHI to create a pre and post test for all students to complete so administrators could determine how much long term knowledge students gained from the courses The goal really is to prepare our students to be learners and professionals in the 21st century Lawson says They need these skills to provide safe and cutting edge patient care LINC Scholars Program For students who want to go

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/resources/Pages/SystemsChangeBrodySchoolOfMedicine.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • All
    whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of Profound Knowledge to the PDSA cycle to run charts The Model for Improvement Part 2 Robert Lloyd the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of Profound Knowledge to the PDSA cycle to run charts Static Vs Dynamic Data Robert Lloyd the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of Profound Knowledge to the PDSA cycle to run charts PDSA Cycles Part 2 Robert Lloyd the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of Profound Knowledge to the PDSA cycle to run charts Run Charts Part 1 Robert Lloyd the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of Profound Knowledge to the PDSA cycle to run charts Run Charts Part 2 Robert Lloyd the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of Profound Knowledge to the PDSA cycle to run charts Driver Diagrams Robert Lloyd the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of Profound Knowledge to the PDSA cycle to run charts Flowcharts Part 1 Robert Lloyd the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of Profound Knowledge to the PDSA cycle to run charts Flowcharts Part 2 Robert Lloyd the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of Profound Knowledge to the PDSA cycle to run charts Control Charts Part 1 Robert Lloyd the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of Profound Knowledge to the PDSA cycle to run charts Control Charts Part 2 Robert Lloyd the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of Profound Knowledge to the PDSA cycle to run charts Family of Measures Robert Lloyd the Director of Performance Improvement at IHI uses his trusty whiteboard to dissect the science of improvement In short videos he breaks down everything from Deming s System of

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/resources/pages/ViewAll.aspx?FilterField3=IHI_x0020_Offering&FilterValue3=864a4cda-a1e1-4685-a70b-dcffcd75433d&Filter3ChainingOperator=And&TargetWebPath=/education/ihiopenschool/resources&orb=Created (2016-02-01)
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  • Past Strategic Initiatives
    Posterboards Other Websites Regions Regions Overview Africa Asia Pacific Europe Latin America Middle East North America Engage with IHI Engage with IHI Overview Collaboratives Initiatives Membership Programs Fellowship Programs Strategic Partnerships Customized Services Blogs and User Groups Home Engage with IHI Initiatives Completed Initiatives Completed Initiatives IHI LR 2 Col Top Past Strategic Initiatives Page Content 5 Million Lives Campaign The 5 Million Lives Campaign was a voluntary initiative to protect patients from five million incidents of medical harm over the next two years December 2006 December 2008 How Will We Do That Building Low Cost High Quality Health Care Regions in America The goal for How Will We Do That was to build awareness among the American public and policy makers that successful models for achieving high quality care at significantly reduced cost already exist in many regions and in many forms throughout the US Idealized Design of the Clinical Office Practice IDCOP The aim of the Idealized Design of Clinical Office Practices IDCOP initiative was to demonstrate that clinical office practices with appropriate redesign can achieve significant improvements in performance to meet today s urgent social needs for higher value health care Impacting Cost Quality Leaders from pioneering organizations have come together to work on the most significant health care leadership challenge of our time They are identifying and driving out waste in their systems while improving the quality of care delivered to patients New Health Partnerships The New Health Partnerships initiative seeks to use behavior change and health care system models to develop and test the most effective and efficient approaches for providing support to patients of a sort which enables and encourages greater patient self management while at the same time stimulating greater patient engagement in efforts to improve the design and delivery of health care

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/Engage/Initiatives/Completed/Pages/default.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • Promising Care: How We Can Rescue Health Care by Improving It
    show why our medical systems don t reliably contribute to our overall health As a remedy he offers a vision for making our systems better safer more effective more efficient and more humane Each of Berwick s compelling speeches is preceded by a brief commentary by a prominent figure in health care policy or politics who has a unique connection to that particular speech Contributors include such notables as Tom Daschle Paul Batalden and Lord Nigel Crisp Their commentaries reflect on how it felt to hear the speech in the context in which it was delivered and assess its relevance in today s health care environment The introduction is written by Maureen Bisognano CEO of Institute for Healthcare Improvement and author of Pursuing the Triple Aim Promising Care presents a second installment of speeches with Berwick s previous book Escape Fire capturing his IHI National Forum speeches from 1992 through 2002 Also available as an E book Use code POC30 to receive a 30 discount on the book or E book from Wiley Average Content Rating 1 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments by Paul Shank 1 7 2014 10 27 39 AM Is this a serious comment or am I missing the satire Do you really believe most of the 48 million uninsured Americans WANT to be uninsured The system prior to ACA i e 48 million uninsured was the product of free enterprise So let your daughter know that regardless of her chosen career path or circumstances she ll be able to have affordable health insurance It will no longer be a privilege for those who can afford it loading Did you find this user comment useful people found this user comment useful Report This by Rick Schoeling 12 15 2013 4 44 48 PM It would have been best to try to improve the system we had The majority of people that wanted unsurance had it Now we have large numberws of people that have and will loose their insurance that had it Our insurance rates would go down if thay opended it up to free enterprise and let competition decide on rates Now we will never know because our government has taken over Their also the ones that keep us from opening up competition between state lines Another example of Big Government and Big Business hurting the middle class Now everyone will get poor care instead of just the 10 that did not want insurance anyway What do I tell my daughter of 7 Your dreams of a great America are guaranteed to be gone in the future Rick loading Did you find this user comment useful people found this user comment useful Report This Show More Comments Loading You are about to report a violation of our Terms of Use All reports are strictly confidential Reason Select One Contains profanity or violence Spam Defamatory Illegal Unlawful Copyright Violation Other Please

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/Publications/PromisingCareRescueHealthCareByImprovingIt.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • How-to Guide: Running a Successful Campaign in Your Hospital
    characteristics of successful Campaign participants Chief among those traits is the complete and genuine involvement of every stakeholder group in the hospital boards leaders managers front line providers and patients and families This How to Guide describes the roles and responsibilities of each of those stakeholders based on the IHI Campaign s experience and observation of successful practices in the field This guide also offers instruction on the quality improvement methods we recommend for effectively introducing each of the six Campaign interventions Appendix A along with links to new and updated resources for successful implementation Documents Documents How to Guide Running a Successful Campaign in Your Hospital Average Content Rating 1 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments by Zovig Kevorkian 7 28 2014 2 10 09 PM The URL for the How to Guide Running a Successful Campaign in Your Hospital comes up blank loading Did you find this user comment useful people found this user comment useful Report This Show More Comments Loading You are about to report a violation of our Terms of Use All reports are strictly confidential Reason Select One Contains profanity or violence Spam Defamatory Illegal Unlawful Copyright Violation Other Please select a reason for this report Add a Note Your comments were submitted successfully There was an error reporting your complaint More on This Topic Loading Pages first last A Two Way Street What the United States Can Learn from Resource Limited Countries to Improve Health Care Delivery and Reduce Costs This article highlights five key ideas for bidirectional innovation gathered from the experience of health care providers and health system managers in resource limited countries that may have a meaningful impact on health care quality and safety if

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/Tools/HowtoGuideRunningSuccessfulCampaign.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • How-to Guide: Sustainability and Spread
    strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done them better The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood who strives valiantly who errs and comes short again and again because there is no effort without error and shortcoming but who does actually try to do the deeds who knows the great enthusiasms the great devotions who spends himself in a worthy cause who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst if he fails at least fails while daring greatly so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat 5 SETMA s formation did risk failure but we were determined that if we failed it would not be because we did not try If we failed it would not be because we did not set the standard very high and try to scale the wall to reach the standard If we failed it would not be because we sat on the sidelines and envied what others were achieving In the sixties there was a wonderful song entitled To Dream the Impossible Dream We were willing to dream what at the time seemed impossible And we realized that it was possible not to be able to achieve SETMA s goals which was To create a clinic where our patients Healthcare is the Only Care To fulfill SETMA s private motto of Doing Good While We Do Well To answer every call every day from every patient To compassionately care for those for whom no one else cared To honorably and honestly deal with every issue which came before SETMA To review every laboratory and x ray report the day that it is reported To deal courteously and kindly with discourteous and unkind people To instill dignity and respect into every person who contacts SETMA whether in person or on the phone To improve the health of our patients by expanding the services which are available to them To set the standard for quality health care in the Golden Triangle SETMA took the risk and succeeded In the process of building a team we succeeded It is not surprising that team building is both a process and an outcome of risk taking Team Building as a Family The SETMA family did not result from our having the same mother and father but nevertheless we became a family We were of different backgrounds nationalities faiths ethnicities genders and ages but we became a family We enjoyed watching each member of the SETMA family grow and mature Today we continue still delight in seeing what each colleague can become individually and what we all can become collectively As the SETMA team emerged it was a delight And as a family team we all became protective of each other When one hurt we all hurt when one rejoiced we all rejoiced As pointed out above there were disappointments There were those who did not want to be part of SETMA s team or family Some left quietly others used their relationship with SETMA to build other businesses before leaving Over time we discovered that everyone that left only strengthened SETMA in leaving We learned that as a family We were more interested in solutions than in blame When we discovered a problem or when we experienced a problem our first thought was How can I solve this problem rather than Whose fault is this A family wants everyone to succeed Early in SETMA a memo stated You will never be as successful as when you help someone else fulfill their potential while you are succeeding yourself Blame is cheap and therefore worthless solutions are expensive and therefore extremely valuable We wanted to support others when they were having a bad hair day or when they have a special personal need We wanted to support them with enthusiasm We wanted support them with an eye to making their load lighter even if it meant a brief increase in our load In the long run this approach to a team spirit will make us all winners We wanted others especially the guests of our family who are our patients to think well of our family and to speak well of our family It s so much more encouraging to our guests when they hear us say Can you believe how busy our front office is and yet they still get the job done I m sorry for your delay but they are a great team Rather than That dumb front office lost your chart When we speak well of other members of our family we really speak well of ourselves When we speak badly of them our guests associate that negative attitude with us as well We wanted our guests to have the best possible experience with our family Therefore the first contact with us had to be positive The receptionists had to be friendly attentive and helpful No one could be ignored in our waiting room The file clerks needed to reflect an attitude of wanting to help the entire team function well They needed to speak kindly to one another and they needed to do their best to facilitate our guests having a good experience while in SETMA s office We wanted our guest to look into our front office and say This is the kind of place I want to come to Team Building Requires Leaders The team leaders of SETMA some people call them physicians or health care providers but we called them what they are team leaders needed to be leaders especially when things are going badly Rather than succumb to frustration and irritation team leaders needed to encourage those around them to avoid Anger there is not a more destructive emotion in a family in that it reflects a low regard for the person hood of the one toward whom anger is expressed Impatience this is a condescending and demeaning attitude which suggests that the one toward whom impatience is being expressed is less important than the one who is impatient The truth is that everyone in our family is important and no one is unimportant If they a person are not important then they don t need to be here If they are here they need to be treated with the dignity and appreciation which their importance requires Rudeness a rude and thoughtless person reflects their own poor character not anything about the one toward whom they are rude Rudeness is unthinkable from anyone but especially from a leader On the anniversary of his hundredth birthday friends and acquaintances of Albert Einstein were asked to remember him The most common memory was the he was KIND Rudeness and kindness are mutually exclusive Selfishness nothing is more unattractive in a family than self centeredness which is reflected in ignoring the needs of others in order to get what you want Leadership means that you put aside your needs for the benefit of others Physicians as team leaders look to the meeting of the needs of those who support them even before team leaders needs are met This often means neglecting the leader s business interests pastimes and friends until the needs of other team members are met such as getting to lunch on time at noon or getting home on time in the evening A leader also puts the interests of his or her guests above his own which means delaying other activities and treating his or her guests with preferential attention A leader is one who keeps his or her cool when everyone else is loosing theirs A leader is not one who occupies a position but one who overcomes pressure rises above it and shows others how to do the same A leader is one whom others can lean on when they are down discouraged or disappointed Every team member no matter what their position has the potential of being a leader And leadership is what a company looks for when rewarding service A team cannot exist without leaders but leaders are not commanders they are colleagues examples and they are those who see something which needs to be done and they do it By example they lead members of their team to become leaders themselves loading Did you find this user comment useful people found this user comment useful Report This by James Holly 7 8 2013 2 20 19 PM Team Building and Momentum Momentum and inertia explain why it takes less energy to maintain a course and speed once they have been achieved than it does to gain that speed and course In 1995 1997 SETMA had both momentum it would take tremendous energy and effort to stop what we were doing and inertia SETMA LLP had a tendency to maintain the course and speed which had been established Everyday each one of us realized how much easier it was to maintain what we had started than it was to get it started to begin with i e that which seemed to take such a huge effort had become a daily routine The effort required to answer every call every day from every patient seems to be less and less every day that we do it The effort to get all lab correspondence hospital records consultations and other materials into the files got to be less and less everyday This was seen SETMA was still on paper records but our commitments to excellence made the adoption of electronic patient records both inevitable and essential The effort to see patients within reasonable proximity to their appointment time became less and less burdensome every day that we did it Teamwork requires momentum in order to sustain its work team leaders are a kind of fly wheel which provided the momentum to sustain the work of the team Team Building things to avoid Success doesn t take much more energy to achieve than failure your goals just have to be different Our goals defined in 1995 1998 were 1 To do well while we were doing good Doing well is our reward for doing good doing good was what we did for our patients 2 To establish a work environment where every employee finds personal fulfillment and satisfaction which is why we rejected a Disharmony because of our goals and commitments we did tolerate bickering and backbiting We established the following principle about attitudes If you don t have something good to say about others in SETMA LLP then you will need to find some place else to work b Disloyalty because of our concern for the welfare of each and every member of SETMA s team and because of our commitment to the practice of excellent medicine we did not tolerate disloyalty The second principle we established was If you do not respect and embrace the mission of SETMA and the associates of that organization then you need to find another place to work c Dishonesty each partner of SETMA has committed himself to a level of personal integrity and rectitude which established a standard for all employees This third principle of attitude was No employee of SETMA will ever be asked to distort facts or tell a lie for this corporation Therefore each employee was expected to maintain an absolute commitment to honesty d Discourtesy all patients clients callers and visitors to SETMA will be treated with dignity respect and courtesy The fourth principle was No employee of SETMA will ever be allowed to be abused by anyone coming to this office and conversely no employee of SETMA will ever be allowed to abuse a patient guest or visitor SETMA s mission was to creatively collegially and cooperatively build a model of excellence in the delivery of primary health care services to Southeast Texas such that every employee can be proud to be a part of this unique experiment Team Building Adding New Members to the Team SETMA learned a great deal about team building when on June 17 1996 Certified Family Nurse Practitioner Mrs Sandra Amen Fowler began working with SETMA Mrs Fowler represented a new dimension of health care provider We delighted that she chose to join the SETMA team Because the concept of a Nurse Practitioner was novel to us the following explanation was sent to our staff a Unless Mrs Fowler instructs you otherwise her position as an independent health care provider would make it appropriate for you to address her by her title rather than by her first name b All of us will be learning about Mrs Fowler s professional capabilities and about this new relationship The partners of SETMA welcome Mrs Fowler as a colleague and would like you to extend her your full cooperation and the courtesies which her achieving the professional status of CFNP warrants c Mrs Fowler is a team member of SETMA LLP and like the physicians of SETMA sees her role as both team leader and facilitator of your success and fulfillment in this organization Introduce yourself to her and let her know what a friendly and supportive team SETMA is The physicians were eager to have other Nurse Practitioners join SETMA as soon as possible All of SETMA was encouraged to enjoy a collegial relationship of teaching and learning in relationship to Mrs Fowler the Nurse Practitioners who are training with SETMA and the Nurse Practitioners whom we are recruiting to joining SETMA Mrs Fowler provided the opportunity for SETMA to expand our concept of a team Nothing illustrated this more than an event which occurred on the second day Mrs Fowler worked with SETMA As SETMA s CEO stepped into an examination room Mrs Fowler had just finished drawing blood Startled she dropped the tube of blood and it broke Immediately she stooped down and SETMA s CEO said What are you doing She said that she was going to clean up the blood He told her to stand up and said I am going to clean up the blood which he did He added I want you to learn that you are not here to do what I don t want to do You are not here as a scrub nurse You are here as a healthcare provider who has a license to practice medicine within certain parameters You are my colleague I will never ask you to do anything which I am not willing to do And I will never ask you to don anything which is not legal ethical and moral Therefore I will always expect you to do what I ask This established a relationship of mutual respect between all members of SETMA s team which has existed every since In less than six months Mrs Fowler reached and exceeded the goals which she and her colleagues set for her participation in SETMA During a difficult time in SETMA s development she functioned outstandingly In an in house publication the following note was sent to all of SETMA When you see Mrs Fowler congratulate her on a job well done Let her know how proud we are of her and how proud we is that she is a part of the SETMA family Team Building Attitudes All in a supervisory role were asked to follow the following simple guidelines We believed that doing such would contribute to our team building efforts by make everyone s job more pleasant and fulfilling The request reflected the respect we wish for each team member to have toward others and the expectation that anyone and everyone could become a leader in SETMA 1 Invite creative input about their areas of responsibility from those you manage 2 Involve everyone in your department in problem solving 3 Be kind to those with you whom you work and be sensitive to their feelings These attitudes reflect SETMA belief that leadership has more to do with serving others than you having others serve you WE believed that how we related to one another would communicate to our patients the guests of SETMA s family to know how pleased we are that they chose SETMA by letting them see how effectively this family works together and above all how much we value and appreciate one another Team Building Individuals Functioning as a Unit We emphasized that we should never minimize how important it is for each of us to be a positive constructive part of SETMA s team We acknowledged that such a team does not happen without a great deal of effort on everyone s part The attitudes identified above would turn into action through which building such a team would occur The actions are 1 Doing more than is expected of you and expecting nothing for it 2 Doing someone else s work when they are overwhelmed and expecting no thanks for it And also not expecting others to do your work Interesting dynamic isn t it When everyone is operating on these two principles you will be amazed how much work can get done and how good you will feel about having done it Working by these principles results in the attitude I m going to do this now because if I don t someone else will do it or will have to do it rather than the attitude If I just procrastinate or neglect this someone else will do it You ll be amazed at how your job satisfaction will increase when you work in an environment where everyone is trying to do the job so that someone else doesn t have to do it 3 Seeing pressures and problems as opportunities for non verbally expressing your appreciation for others 4 Not complaining when you feel pressured or when you are asked to do something which you would rather not do Anyone can complain and cause dissension

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/Tools/HowtoGuideSustainabilitySpread.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • The 100,000 Lives Campaign: Setting a goal and a deadline for improving health care quality
    a deadline for improving health care quality Publications Resources Resources How to Improve Measures Changes Improvement Stories Tools Publications IHI White Papers Case Studies Audio and Video Presentations Posterboards Other Websites IHI LR Wide The 100 000 Lives Campaign Setting a goal and a deadline for improving health care quality Page Content Berwick DM Calkins DR McCannon CJ Hackbarth AD The 100 000 Lives Campaign Setting a goal and a deadline for improving health care quality Journal of the American Medical Association Jan 2006 295 3 324 327 In this article Don Berwick and others describe IHI s 100 000 Lives Campaign and its six interventions that can help save the lives of thousands of patients View article abstract Average Content Rating 1 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments Show More Comments Loading You are about to report a violation of our Terms of Use All reports are strictly confidential Reason Select One Contains profanity or violence Spam Defamatory Illegal Unlawful Copyright Violation Other Please select a reason for this report Add a Note Your comments were submitted successfully There was an error reporting your complaint More on This Topic Loading Pages first last WIHI New Tools and Thinking for Shared Decision Making January 28 2016 If you work in primary care today odds are good that you re seeing patients with multiple chronic conditions Even if a provider and patient work together to choose the right medications and agree on making some lifestyle changes that will improve health the best laid plans often fall apart WIHI Harnessing Improvement to Reduce Diagnostic Errors and Delays December 1 2015 One in twenty adults suffers a diagnostic error every year How do we take such a formidable

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/resources/Pages/Publications/100000LivesCampaignSettingaGoalandaDeadline.aspx (2016-02-01)
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