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    Measures Changes Improvement Stories Tools Publications IHI White Papers Case Studies Audio and Video Presentations Posterboards Other Websites Regions Regions Overview Africa Asia Pacific Europe Latin America Middle East North America Engage with IHI Engage with IHI Overview Collaboratives Initiatives Membership Programs Fellowship Programs Strategic Partnerships Customized Services Blogs and User Groups Warning this page is not encrypted for secure communication User names passwords and any other information will be sent in clear text For more information contact your administrator Log In Already registered Log in Email Password Forgot Password Remember my email and password on this computer not recommended for public computers please wait Back Register with ihi org Not registered Join the ihi org community now Registration with the site is free and open to all Newsletter Sign Up Register with ihi org to sign up for IHI s email services You ll receive IHI s weekly e newsletter This Week IHI and other improvement content Personalize Your Experience Registering with ihi org will allow you to personalize your web site experience Benefits of Registration Download content and use interactive tools Rate and comment on content Share your tools and other content with ihi org users Create public

    Original URL path: https://www.ihi.org/_layouts/ihi/login/login.aspx?hidemsg=true&ReturnURL=%2f_layouts%2fihi%2flogin%2flogin.aspx%3fhidemsg%3dtrue%26ReturnURL%3d%252fPages%252fdefault.aspx (2016-02-01)
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  • Chapter Spotlight: Shadowing, Improving Access to Care, and Online Courses at Valdosta State
    perfect fit After many discussions with my faculty advisors I took their advice on starting the first health care organization that s part of VSU s College of Business Administration Now we have 71 members OS What about your Chapter work are you most proud of this year JP I am very proud of the dedicated students in our Chapter it s what makes a new student organization so strong Each month we take two or three students to the South Georgia Medical Center Hospital Authority open session meetings I came up with the idea after my multiple shadowing experiences with two former CEOs there It s great to see the excitement of the members experiencing what it is like to be in a professional health care environment Increasing access to care in our community is another great project we re working on Our Chapter is helping fundraise for the South Georgia Partnership for Health a medical dental clinic that provides free health care for the working uninsured in Lowndes County OS What tips would you give other Chapter leaders JP Give the students a way to use the skills they are learning from the Open School courses in the real world Here at the VSU Chapter we have made it our mission to create internship opportunities for our students Another tip would be to communicate with your members and be available to answer any questions or concerns they may have Ask your members what they would like to see done as well While being a resource to your members you are developing the leadership skills students need to take on bigger roles as health care professionals OS What disciplines are represented in your Chapter JP Our Chapter is primarily students studying health care administration As we continue to grow we are looking to involve more pre medical students and pre dental students We have a few nursing students graduate students and a student studying international business and marketing OS What are your goals for 2016 JP My goal for next year is to have students from all health professions represented as well as the addition of more graduate students at VSU I want to have an internship program with South Georgia Medical Center that includes an improvement project as part of the intern s work I d also love to continue to increase the number of students who have completed the Open School certificate OS What are your favorite Open School courses JP My favorite courses are the lessons on leadership and patient safety Learn more about the IHI Open School Chapter network in our free course OS 101 Introduction to the IHI Open School or find a Chapter near you in our Chapter map Tags Chapter Network Blog Home Older Average Content Rating 0 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments Show More Comments Loading You are about to report a violation of our

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=203 (2016-02-01)
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  • IHI’s Ten Picks from 2015
    approach Project Fives Alive has achieved remarkable results a 31 percent reduction in under 5 mortality in 134 hospitals a 37 percent reduction in post neonatal infant mortality and a 35 percent reduction in under 5 malaria case fatality The publication Lessons Learned from Ghana s Project Fives Alive A Practical Guide for Designing and Executing Large Scale Improvement Initiatives harvests lessons from this work about project design building quality improvement capability managing complex partner relationships providing effective leadership and more The Employer Led Health Care Revolution When Intel started working with Virginia Mason Medical Center VMMC some amazing things happened Intel s leaders weren t happy with rising health care costs and VMMC was in a position to do something about that It s a powerful story that was captured in the Harvard Business Review article The Employer Led Health Care Revolution co authored by IHI Executive Director of Innovation Lindsay Martin Lean improvement methods and continuous quality improvement were successfully put to the test like never before in an unprecedented collaborative the model for which is very much worth studying IHI continues to engage in research on employer driven redesign of health care How to Talk about Dying In her continuing efforts to encourage conversations about end of life care Ellen Goodman s New York Times op ed How to Talk about Dying is another compelling rendering of how Ellen s experiences gave rise to The Conversation Project The difference between a good death and a hard death often seemed to hinge essentially on whether someone s wishes were expressed and respected she says While The Conversation Project is a public engagement campaign to transform the culture surrounding end of life care IHI s Conversation Ready work focuses on ensuring that health care organizations have systems in place to receive patients wishes to record them in the health record and to respect them by providing care aligned with patients stated wishes Owning the Equity Challenge in Health Care Researchers have been documenting and discussing health and health care disparities in the US for years Improvers are now calling for a shift to demonstrating and writing about promising solutions In a post to the IHI Blog Dr Patrick Courneya describes Kaiser Permanente s work to reduce disparities that has generated some promising results A post to the Health Affairs Blog Moving from Documenting Disparities to Reducing Them stems from an IHI session at the 2015 AcademyHealth panel on Disparities Diversity and Inclusion We invite you to partake of the IHI Open School online course TA 102 Improving Health Equity which is freely accessible during the month of January 2016 Reducing C Sections in Brazil Brazil s high C section rate often garners media attention In 2015 the issue got the attention of The Economist Caesar s Legions delves into the rise of Cesarean sections C sections around the world including Brazil where in 2009 the C section rate was 57 percent with estimates that in Brazil s private health

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/communities/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=7d1126ec-8f63-4a3b-9926-c44ea3036813&ID=183 (2016-02-01)
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  • The Man Behind the MOOC: A New IHI-HarvardX Online Course on Quality Improvement in Health Care
    with me so I d like to get personal for a moment about why I m excited about this unique collaboration I spend most of my time at IHI but there s more to my professional life I also teach a general education course at Harvard College called The Toll of Infection Understanding Disease in Scientific Social and Cultural Contexts Students in that class often want to know about my career And perhaps you too might be wondering how a Harvard professor with deep roots in academia ended up teaching practical improvement methods at IHI The story begins about 20 years ago when I was in charge of preventing hospital acquired infections at Boston Children s Hospital The CEO called me in one day and told me that he admired my work especially the rigorous way I was applying epidemiology to an important hospital patient safety problem I was flattered of course But then he pointed out that there were a lot of other quality and safety problems that I should be tackling not just hospital acquired infections He asked me to become Medical Director of QI I agreed under two conditions First I wanted to recruit a small team of health services researchers who would work alongside the QI team to advance the academic credibility of QI through research and publication I also wanted them to tackle some of the problems that frustrate clinicians and lead to inferior outcomes for patients Second I would not hand in my white coat for a suit I wanted to practice what I would be preaching about scientific improvement on my own pediatric ward I wanted to demonstrate the value of working in an interprofessional partnership with the head nurse on the ward and to show residents and junior doctors how they could learn QI as part of their routine daily work Most of all I wanted to try out the QI methods I was learning from IHI and especially from Don Berwick who was an attending physician on my service It was Don who showed me how to integrate rigorous QI into our teaching rounds by asking simple questions about the data we were recording and the decisions we were making the kinds of questions you will learn to ask and answer in this MOOC Based on that real world experience I ve continued to operate under the theory that academics and quality improvers mutually benefit from learning and working together This is even embodied in my IHI title Chief Medical AND Scientific Officer This MOOC is the culmination of the marriage of improvement and science that has characterized my career both at Harvard and at IHI I have benefitted greatly from my colleagues at Harvard who have brought their own research methods to the QI field and I hope they have benefitted from the disciplined approach to improvement we use at IHI So that s me and here we are Harvard and IHI academics and quality improvers working together in a

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/communities/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=7d1126ec-8f63-4a3b-9926-c44ea3036813&ID=182 (2016-02-01)
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  • Year in Review: 9 Things You Might Have Missed
    methods in PH556X Practical Improvement Science in Health Care A Roadmap for Getting Results a six week course starting January 20 2016 It s a great way to introduce new learners to QI so we hope you ll recommend it to colleagues A new way to get to know the Open School If you re new to quality and safety where do you start This year we heard from students that they needed an introduction to the quality and safety movement and the Open School As a result we have a new course called OS 101 Introduction to the Open School It walks you through the courses the Chapter network and how to lead a Chapter It s freely available to everyone Please share widely Videos videos and more videos Did you know that YouTube is now the world s second largest search engine It s clear that video is a powerful format that s here to stay So the Open School team spent dozens of hours filming expert interviews on a wide variety of topics to bring you short snippets of learning in an easy to watch format Browse more than 150 clips by topic in our new Video Library Twenty eight real world projects to improve care This year Open School learners tested their quality improvement skills in the real world through our hands on Practicum In this course students form teams and submit key documents for review by the IHI Open School s Faculty Advisor Dr James Moses Some of the projects we ve featured on our blog this year include screening for social determinants of health improving depression screening for diabetic patients reducing unnecessary blood tests and improving follow up with sickle cell patients Two million course completions and counting It s hard to believe that in just seven years the Open School s training on quality and safety has spread so far This year we hit a milestone learners have completed 2 million courses A custom made QI game at the IHI National Forum This year Open School all star Dr Lakshman Swamy served as one of four co chairs of the IHI National Forum He and Dr Chris Worsham Internal Medicine Resident at Boston Medical Center also led an exciting innovative simulation of a quality improvement project condensed into a few hours at the Chapter Congress Open School learners tested their skills and teamwork in the Virtual Practicum proposing improvements to reduce the number of mental health patients leaving the hospital before discharge pictured at top Continuous improvement of Open School courses This year Open School editors improved QI 103 Measuring for Improvement QI 106 Mastering PDSA Cycles and Run Charts PS 100 Introduction to Patient Safety PS 101 Fundamentals of Patient Safety and PS 102 Human Factors and Safety We created new videos added recent cases and responded to learner feedback We re also really excited about a brand new design for our online courses you can get a sneak peek in OS

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=201 (2016-02-01)
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  • Don’t Go It Alone: How to Get the Most Out of Any Conference
    me from Cincinnati Children s to attend IHI s Annual Summit on Improving Patient Care in the Office Practice and the Community The other year I brought the clinical manager Shelia Stegall from our small pediatric practice with me Shelia was like a sponge She soaked up all the information she gleaned from the various sessions and keynotes she attended This didn t come as a surprise but I hadn t expected her to be so engaged and enthusiastic about it Without me asking her to do it she went home afterward and communicated with the nurses and medical assistants about what she learned We re so far behind she told them Look at what the rest of the country is doing She was like a cheerleader and she helped people understand where we needed to go Shelia shared material on coaching and motivational interviewing care coordination team roles and team well being novel ways of delivering care and how to keep patients at the center I could not have done that on my own It was her energy enthusiasm and relationships with the medical assistants that helped to spur change I wish I could bring 100 people from Cincinnati Children s with me to the IHI Summit this year We won t be able to do that but our patients have reaped the benefits from multiple team members learning together so we try to bring as many people as we can every year If you decide to bring your colleagues with you to the IHI Summit or other conference here are some tips for making the most of the experience Compare notes when my colleagues and I attend some of the same sessions we discuss what we ve heard and seen afterward We then decide together how we re going to implement some new ideas in our practices when we return home Divide and conquer I multiply my learning opportunities when my colleagues make different session choices and we share what we learned later Take advantage of the break from routine we have more time to talk when we re at a conference than we do back home We re not rushing from meeting to meeting or appointment to appointment in quite the same way The change of environment and time for shared learning helps us see possibilities for improvement in a new light Bring people who want to share what they learn with others if you have a choice pick a colleague to join you who will find the event energizing and inspiring Work with someone who will be excited about spreading the best of what they learn to others when you get home Health care is going through a lot of transformation but at its heart it still relies on people to people connections We ve all been learning especially in the last few years that to make health and health care work for our patients we need to collaborate more We can start by taking full

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/communities/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=7d1126ec-8f63-4a3b-9926-c44ea3036813&ID=181 (2016-02-01)
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  • Improving Mental Health in Springfield: Virtual Practicum Builds Skills for Students
    of options to learn more about what was going on Gemba walks a term from Lean Production that means going to the front lines emails between staff members and promotional materials from technology companies offering quick fixes The teams then used driver diagrams cause and effect diagrams and process mapping to understand the patient s journey from admission to departure or discharge and where things were going wrong But quality improvement the activity leaders reminded the learners isn t about analysis it s about taking action As the teams started testing changes one proposed more accountability and training for the 1 1 sitters whose job was to observe patients and alert staff if a patient seemed likely to leave They also implemented a code system to identify security sooner a response team that could go to the exits on the floor and watch for patients exiting They thought technology and more staffing could really help but realized that would be a hard sell to the hospital s ever cost conscious administrators More PDSA cycles followed as teams redesigned the unit to have psychiatric patients grouped together near staff and away from exits and added an alarm to the exit QI facilitators at each table a mix of Open School faculty leaders IHI staff and IHI s Improvement Advisor Professional Development Program graduates showed real time results based on each change the teams decided to test Jena Kitchmaster a nursing student at Bellin College in Green Bay Wisconsin said the problem was true to her experience working on a medical surgical floor It hits home Kitchmaster said This was my first experience with QI and I liked that it was a realistic problem At the end of the activity the QI facilitators determined three finalists Three teams including Jena s were selected to present to the students while Dr Patrick Courneya Executive Vice President Chief Medical Officer for Kaiser Foundation Hospitals and Health Plan listened to determine a winner Courneya was impressed that the finalists didn t jump first to technology as too often happens in health care and that they learned from success as well as failure He picked a winner Team Spider Pig before the full group headed to the popular Faculty Student Reception Hearing inspirational leaders is an exciting part of the Forum but working together is what matters the most Swamy said We are the future of health care Tags Quality Improvement National Forum Chapter Network Blog Home Older Average Content Rating 1 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments by Deborah Michiko Fried 12 10 2015 1 55 32 PM I echo the prior comment What was the winning proposal Also if cost of care is one of the main factors leading to this problem was there discussion about appropriate staffing Often staff cuts are a significant contributor to quality of care issues loading Did you find this user comment useful people

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=200 (2016-02-01)
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  • 15 Years after To Err Is Human: The Status of Patient Safety in the US and the UK
    Policy Manager at the Health Foundation describes is all too familiar to me as an American who has traveled extensively because the challenges are universal The paper reports on the status of patient safety in Britain and describes the difficult challenge of continually trying to improve it Illingsworth states that although there have been many changes tested and implemented to improve safety many systems are not designed with patient safety in mind It is only the skill and resilience of health care professionals he asserts that prevents many more episodes of harm However he also argues we cannot adequately address system problems through individual efforts or local improvement initiatives alone The first part of the report focuses on the case for change As with other safety critical industries Illingworth contends it is imperative that when failures do occur lessons are learned and action is taken to prevent the same issues reoccurring This notion of a continuous learning system is key element of IHI s Framework for Safety The second part of the report focuses on safety and improvement in practice One of the key lessons is that while many resources have rightly been invested in reporting and measurement systems that help us learn from the past we must put as much effort into looking forward and anticipating risks In other words attention spent understanding what has already happened should not blind us to the future It would be like driving your car while constantly looking into the rearview mirror The report ends with a vision of an effective system for safety which includes Measurement and monitoring Improvement and learning Engagement and culture Strategy and accountability The National Patient Safety Foundation NPSF Report Not Enough Change Since To Err Is Human A committee co chaired by Dr Don Berwick and Dr Kavek Shajania issued the NPSF s Free from Harm Accelerating Patient Safety Improvement Fifteen Years after To Err Is Human Similar to the Health Foundation s assessment of patient safety in the UK the NPSF report states that despite some improvement in patient safety in the United States the pace and scale of improvement has been disappointingly slow and limited Patients continue to experience harm when interacting with the health care system and consequently much more needs to be done Like the Health Foundation NPSF also notes that the problem of making health care safer is far more complex than initially understood The NPSF report includes eight recommendations see infographic right Ensure that leaders establish and sustain a safety culture Create a centralized and coordinated approach to patient safety Create a common set of safety metrics that reflect meaningful outcomes Prioritize funding for research in patient safety and implementation science Address safety across the entire care continuum Support the health care workforce Partner with patients and families for the safest care Ensure that technology is safe and optimized to improve patient safety None of the recommendations in either report is new but are we finally prepared to put them into

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/communities/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=7d1126ec-8f63-4a3b-9926-c44ea3036813&ID=180 (2016-02-01)
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