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  • Why Hospitals Should Fly...
    greatly due to inaccessibility to these agencies 24 Hr Care is available on Deck 9 You can access Deck 9 by any means But in exchange for this convenience you will likely need to wait several hours before being seen A 24 Hr All You Can Eat Pizza Bar is also located on the same Deck to make waiting more tolerable Getting around the ship is most efficiently completed on foot as there are long staircases that connect most Decks However if this is difficult for you please call the main office to arrange for transportation We have a limited number of staff who can carry you to your desired destination But your height and weight may prevent you from taking advantage of this great service Specialty care services for diabetes cancer asthma mental health and hypertension are located in a gilded section of the ship We are practicing cutting edge techniques that are so advanced that there is little literature available about them Please don t hesitate to let us know if you are having difficulties finding our specialty services We would be happy to escort you there Just be sure to bring your boarding passes credit card statement that documents the purchase of this cruise and any records of all of the experiences you have had here onboard We do not have an electronic system connecting all of our services Lastly drug and nutritional supplements must be purchased off of the ship so you are encouraged to step off and explore our various stops These islands are not very well equipped so please be flexible with the inconsistencies of what they have to offer Only the Captain is completely familiar with the ship and its services but given how busy he is he is unlikely to be able to help you navigate your stay We are confident that you all are capable of coordinating your own cruise activities With these simple rules I can guarantee that you will feel so overwhelmed by our top notch services that you will be wondering was it all really worth it Again welcome aboard and enjoy your stay Despite sporadic episodes of safe effective patient centered efficient timely and equal care throughout my third year our inconsistent ability to deliver high quality care has left me almost hopeless for the future of health care But what has reenergized my spirits was reading the book Why Hospitals Should Fly written by John Nance a professional pilot and lawyer with a distinguished career in leading the patient safety movement The book is a fictional narrative that follows a former CEO of a hospital Dr Will Jenkins as he travels to a suburb of Denver CO to visit the fictional St Michael s Memorial Hospital St Michael s is THE ideal hospital that exudes quality not only in its basic processes and operations but also in its culture As Dr Jenkins visits various departments in the hospital the reader not only learns about the effectiveness

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=58 (2016-02-01)
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  • Highlighting Quality Improvement in Toronto
    team had done was one of these projects Over the better part of the last academic year five students from various health care related backgrounds including myself have been engaged in a quality improvement project at one of the major hospitals in downtown Toronto We had the chance to work on a program to improve physician adherence to well established guidelines on the prevention of serious blood clot formation in the legs of non mobile patients We had an opportunity to see how frequently physicians were considering this risk and to initiate interventions in one department aimed at improving the rates of risk assessment While results are still preliminary it does appear as though there was an improvement after these interventions After months of dedication demonstrated by my teammates and our in hospital support it was very rewarding to not only have our poster be viewed by so many influential individuals Having our efforts recognized by being voted 2nd in the conference poster competition was simply icing on the cake It was a fitting culmination to over half a year of hard work overcoming challenges to make improvements to the health care system in our community The QuIPS conference was an excellent venue to share our story and learn from others and I can express nothing but appreciation for being given the chance to do so Craig Olmstead Medical Student University of Toronto Originally posted on June 13 2012 Tags IHI Open School for Health Professions Quality Improvement Patient Safety Chapter Network University of Toronto Leadership Student Blog Home Older Average Content Rating 0 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments Show More Comments Loading You are about to report a violation of our Terms of

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=57 (2016-02-01)
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  • Focusing on Patient Safety in South Carolina
    leaders within the IHI Open School community including the members of University of South Carolina s IHI Open School Chapter and our two Southeast Regional Coordinators As the Symposium began we took front row seats and listened to Maureen Bisognano CEO of the Institute of Healthcare Improvement She first recognized our state for the strides South Carolina has made in decreasing health disparities between populations especially in Columbia Bisognano spoke briefly about the Triple Aim and recognized areas for health care improvement Bisognano then introduced Regina Holliday a painter and patient advocate who painted representations of both the provider and patient perspective throughout the conference Next Dr Atul Gawande spoke about the future of Safe Surgery 2015 and the progress of South Carolina as a pilot state After a short break Dr Eric Coleman from the University of Colorado spoke about the Care Transitions Program At lunch the few students in attendance were recognized and the Lewis Blackman Patient Safety Awards were presented to honor deserving individuals from around the state The lunch accompanied by the South Carolina Philharmonic Orchestra was delicious As our day wrapped up we were fortunate to spend some time talking with Maureen Dr Rick Foster SCHA Vice President of Quality and Patient Safety our IHI Open School Regional Coordinators and patient advocate Helen Haskell Lewis Blackman s mother We are grateful we had this opportunity through our involvement with IHI Open School Susie Robinson and Amanda Hobbs President and Vice President Clemson University IHI Open School Chapter Originally posted on May 22 2012 Tags IHI Open School for Health Professions Chapter Network Chapter Leader Patient Safety Blog Home Older Average Content Rating 0 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments by Joseph Johnson 10 31 2013 9 54 31 AM Could someone help me I have been trying to obtain a lean opportunity within a hospital or hospital system although I do not have clinical experience I have 16 years lean six sigma and continuous improvement experience through various industries Furthermore I have a BSc in Operations Management along with an MSc in General Management coupled with having the following certifications Six Sigma Management Six Sigma Healthcare White Belt and Six Sigma Master Black Belt I maybe be reach by email at joe johnsn3 gmail com or by mobile at 803 468 7371 Finally I would be more than happy to forward a copy of my CV Regards Joe Johnson loading Did you find this user comment useful people found this user comment useful Report This Show More Comments Loading You are about to report a violation of our Terms of Use All reports are strictly confidential Reason Select One Contains profanity or violence Spam Defamatory Illegal Unlawful Copyright Violation Other Please select a reason for this report Add a Note Your comments were submitted successfully There was an error reporting your complaint Follow Me Subscribe Blog Archive 2016 2 January

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=48 (2016-02-01)
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  • Former Hospital CEO Visits Chapter at University of Colorado
    Deaconess Medical Center Levy related stories about reducing patient harm transparency of clinical outcomes and leadership in medicine The 80 attendees included students and faculty from the schools of Medicine Nursing Pharmacy Dental Medicine and Public Health as well as residents and staff from several area hospitals All attendees received a copy of Levy s new book Goal Play provided by the Patient Safety Education Partnership which you can learn more about at http www psepartnership org The Chapter continued the discussion this week through a deliberative dialogue that explored the potential benefits and drawbacks of several strategies for the improvement of patient safety Pictured University of Colorado IHI Open School Chapter Steering Committee members Racheal Gilmer Josi Schwan Betty Geer Eric Wannamaker and Dan Stoll Paul Levy Chapter Faculty Advisor Wendy Madigosky The IHI Open School Team Originally posted on May 1 2012 Tags IHI Open School for Health Professions Chapter Network Patient Safety Blog Home Older Average Content Rating 0 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments Show More Comments Loading You are about to report a violation of our Terms of Use All reports are strictly confidential Reason Select One Contains profanity or violence Spam Defamatory Illegal Unlawful Copyright Violation Other Please select a reason for this report Add a Note Your comments were submitted successfully There was an error reporting your complaint Follow Me Subscribe Blog Archive 2016 2 January 2 2015 44 December 2 November 5 October 2 September 4 August 1 July 4 June 5 May 4 April 3 March 6 February 4 January 4 2014 14 December 3 November 1 October 1 August 3 July 1 April 2 March 1 January 2 2013 44 December 2 October 1 September

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=46 (2016-02-01)
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  • Big Lessons: Chapters Share Learning from Event at the World's Largest Medical Center
    and event day responsibilities What topics did you include in your event agenda I chose two main topics diagnostic error and safety culture as the focuses for the event for three reasons they are emerging hot topic issues in safety quality they are pertinent to the daily experience of health professions students and we have a few of the nation s leaders in these topics here in the medical center How did you select the speakers Given my desire to focus on safety culture and diagnostic error Dr Eric Thomas and Dr Hardeep Singh were perfect choices They are each leading researchers in these areas respectively and they are both very active in academic and educational roles within the UT Houston and BCM communities How did you advertise the event I was admittedly ambitious with the scope of the event I wanted to involve as many local Houston institutions as possible whether they had IHI Open School Chapters or not as well as a number of out of town chapters knowing that regardless of eventual attendance the effort and publicity from this kind of event would create important awareness and precedent for the future As such my team and I set out to advertise to all the hospitals and health professions schools medical physician assistant pharmacy nursing etc in the medical center and also sent out invitations to other Chapters in surrounding cities For local schools we used paper flyers along with class wide emails and for hospitals we sent out invitation emails For the Chapters and institutions further away I drafted template letters that were sent to the appropriate deans chiefs and or Chapter Leaders We also set up a Facebook event to use social media to publicize the event and used eventbrite com to set up an online invitation What was the biggest challenge you encountered during the planning process With the scope of this event the biggest issue was date selection Because everyone speakers student leaders potential attendees had increasingly busy schedules choosing a date that worked for everyone proved to be a more difficult task that I originally imagined Is there anything that you learned about planning the event that other students would benefit from knowing Honestly probably too many to count But by way of overall lessons I took away two big lessons from this event 1 Don t be afraid to think big While there s a time and place for smaller events I think that if awareness and publicity of the Open School and safety quality in general is a main goal students shouldn t be afraid to think big by inviting speakers publicizing the a larger demographic or selecting creative programming As I learned there are a lot of great secondary benefits to planning an event this way even if the attendance doesn t reflect the number of invited students and professionals From this event I ve already received several emails from people who ve never heard of IHI wanting to join

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=30 (2016-02-01)
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  • Why Is Quality Improvement Important in Health Care?
    routine investigations were repeated and a CT scan was done I asked him to insist on receiving the reports at discharge this time Thankfully after insisting he was given all reports but the CT scan film He improved by the evening and returned to home to New Jersey instead of taking a connecting flight to Madison I rushed from office to the airport to pick up my dear husband who was still in pain The next day I took him to our primary care physician PCP for specialist referral Thanks to the over engineered system that specialist referral was not an easy task One has to go through a gatekeeper The PCP asked for the CT Scan and X ray film Guess what We didn t have it The credit goes to the emergency room protocol where it is not considered necessary to provide all reports to the patient upon discharge An antibiotic cover should have been prescribed earlier at the emergency but for some reason they didn t Probably they believed in Eminence Based Medicine more than Evidence Based Medicine My husband had to take a flight to India in three days to attend a long awaited family function so we requested an earlier referral to confirm if he was fit to fly The PCP asked us to come for a follow up visit the same day that he had his long distance flight To our dismay the referral could not be arranged due to scheduling conflicts under utilization The PCP ordered a repeat CT scan It was extremely difficult to get same day appointment for CT scan So we were asked to go to the emergency room Once there I provided the entire history and reason for the visit to the registrar Since we were referred to the ER for a CT scan while my husband was stable we were willing to pay the extra co pay for the scan After an hourlong process for registration and yet another hour of waiting I was finally able to speak to the emergency room doctor on duty Despite explaining everything to her she had ordered unnecessary blood investigations and IV infusion just for the sake of following ER protocol over utilization Another hour passed and no one showed up for next steps After a couple of reminders a nurse came with IV line equipment This was the limit of our patience My husband was up and about and all we needed was a CT scan to see how his kidneys and the stone were doing in order to be able to decide whether he was fit for a long distance flight the same evening I had to step forward to stop the nurse from repeating those unnecessary procedures Fortunately I was a physician myself and was able to control some of the process to some extent I wonder what the patient journey would be like for people without a medical background In our case had I not stepped forward there

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=15 (2016-02-01)
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  • "What Do I Need to Know for My Clerkships?": A Look at the Lucian Leape Institute Report on Medical Education
    to provide safe patient care Although I have just 8 months of experience in the medical education system I am not surprised by the conclusions of the report A quick glance at the competencies tested in the USMLE Step 1 board exam that second year medical students ordinarily must pass before starting their third year clerkships will demonstrate the emphasis placed on the basic sciences of the body systems While I don t disagree with the importance of understanding the basic sciences of the human body and disease processes I agree with the Lucian Leape Institute report that there is a crucial dimension to patient care that is blatantly missing in an exam that signals that students are ready to be members of a patient care team The transition into a third year medical student is not easy learning how the hospital operates determining and establishing the medical student role on the care team understanding and learning to anticipate the actions of the interns residents and attendings and being prepared to answer any basic sciences question your attendings may ask you a process called pimping The third year is also an important learning opportunity The more procedures and cases seen means a greater breadth of experience for future life saving Impressing your attendings is another facet to the third year of medical school A good recommendation from attendings can go a long way in the residency application process In the thick of all of that medical students are probably too stressed to think about patient safety and definitely don t want to slow down the service just to ask why when witnessing unsafe or needlessly complicated workflow processes The chaos of third year makes asking questions about patient safety and quality improvement professional suicide So how are medical students to learn the skills needed to deliver health care safely The Lucian Leape Institute recommends restructuring medical education to include topics like safety science human factors engineering systems thinking and the science of improvement into the basic science years of medical school The report also recommends that medical students be given opportunities to develop interpersonal skills that include effective communication strategies for future interdisciplinary teamwork In order to include these elements to medical training faculty trained in patient safety and quality improvement who can model good patient safety behavior is essential Unfortunately most medical schools have not reached a critical capacity of faculty for training in patient safety and quality improvement to occur Yet from the student perspective we can t wait another 10 years after the publication of the IOM To Err is Human report to reach that critical capacity Here at the University of Michigan the few faculty we do have trained in patient safety and quality improvement are working hard to provide students with patient safety skills In our first year of medical school we ve had a mandatory nurse shadowing experience and a sociocultural discussion case on medical errors to provide the first exposure to patient safety

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=12 (2016-02-01)
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  • The End of an Era...
    with immigrant parents TV was an important portal to learning what living the American life meant Once I outgrew Sesame Street certain television shows like Full House Family Matters Step by Step Saved by the Bell and MacGyver were okay ed by my parents Then I graduated into watching TV with my parents My parents even marketed shows like Dr Quinn Medicine Woman as a show that could teach me good American history and learn what being a doctor is like I can confidently say that the main reasons why I want to enter the medical field are not rooted in television but I don t think I can say with equal confidence that watching these medical shows has not influenced my perception of the occupation and field I can t count the number of times I ve said like any impressionable child That s so cool I want to be just like him her Studies have shown that television shows don t just affect children but influence the perceptions of watchers of all ages According to the New York Times article ER A Made Up Hospital that Offered Real Medicine two years after the first episode of ER aired a study in the New England Journal of Medicine reported that ER and other shows illustrated an unrealistic and overly positive picture of cardiopulmonary resuscitation CPR How did ER respond In a later episode Dr John Carter breaks an elderly man s ribs while performing CPR This sort of feedback between the medical field and television has resulted in the medical field seeing television as a vehicle to reach millions of people and making television a health information resource Health literacy is extremely important so why not use something people already enjoy and inject a couple of good messages here and there So how did the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist pop onto a show like ER Firms such as Hollywood Health and Society help health organizations and agencies connect with Hollywood writers and help craft their messages in ways that can readily be used on screen Dr Atul Gawande met with the ER writers to highlight the surgical checklist and the rest is well recorded in history Click here to watch the episode While I admit that a lot of what is portrayed on medical dramas is ridiculous and soap opera like interns sleeping with attendings people dropping like flies because of flesh eating bacteria infections etc there is some value in watching medical dramas Health care and medicine are not just about the science of diseases and treatments but is also about the narratives of patients families and health care providers I can t think of a better medium than the television screen to share these narratives with millions of people at a time It certainly doesn t hurt to have a gorgeous Hollywood actor like George Clooney tell the world about how important colonoscopies are after the age of 50 If you had the opportunity to approach Hollywood

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=7 (2016-02-01)
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