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  • What Health Care Can Learn from Marketing
    American Indian people in the Anchorage area to promote physical mental emotional and spiritual wellness through health and related services Steve proposed that in some areas of medicine particularly ambulatory care health care has a whole lot to learn from marketing Why Well the welcome trend initiated both by the Affordable Care Act in the US and escalating health care costs worldwide is a shift from economic incentives tied to caring for the sick to greater rewards for keeping people well But here s the rub the health care system has precious little control over an individual s health In fact we know that there are many determinants of health but studies have shown that health care s impact is only about 20 This means that the individual is in the driver s seat not the health care provider In a world of bundled payments health care providers must learn to influence individuals to make particular choices and act in particular ways Ways that promote their good health Sound familiar We re talking about what the best marketers do every day They understand consumer preferences and behaviors and tailor their offerings to their needs and pain points resulting in significant influence over their choices As Steve said in his talk marketers can make me get up off the couch why can t health care Like marketers health care providers need to recognize this shift and take a new approach The days of marketers creating products designed from the inside out for a mass market and then pushing those products when where and how they want are over Today it s about the consumer being in charge And the savvy marketer asks listens learns and then delivers the right product or service at the right time to the right person at an affordable price that is aligned with value Can we bring that kind of focus and person centered approach to health care I d love to hear your thoughts Gail Freeman Tags Leadership Marketing Patient Familiy Centered Care practce Blog Home Older Average Content Rating 1 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments by Steve Tierney 5 1 2013 1 58 05 PM At SCF when we talk about this we think marketing is much deeper than people in general understand Marketing is a methodology for understanding your consumer base It s a technique to use as you attempt to discover leverage points I think people only view this superficially as commercials and miss all the very careful thought science analysis that goes into a message that can only be 30 seconds long and still have the message change personal opinion or behavior To me its like poetry am actually serious How do you inspire someone with only a very few words as opposed to the much more verbose novelist Great marketing changes what you think and do with tiny snippets of content in only a

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/communities/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=81ca4a47-4ccd-4e9e-89d9-14d88ec59e8d&ID=22 (2016-02-01)
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  • Reliability, Resilience, and Empathy
    Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare in London last week I thought a lot about what to say in my keynote address There would be 3 300 people there from all over the world and I wanted to convey my thoughts about critically important elements of health care I settled on three reliability resilience and empathy Two days before my speech 3 200 miles from London tragedy struck my hometown And when it did we learned that hundreds of health care professionals in Boston were demonstrating all three characteristics and doing so amid the most disastrous and terrifying circumstances The reliability element in Boston came from hundreds of health care professionals doctors nurses technicians and many more putting together a superb plan anticipating the kinds of injuries and maladies that usually affect marathon runners These professionals calculated all the variables and planned so well as to create a superbly reliable system to care for exhausted dehydrated and injured runners Then back to back explosions changed everything The blasts changed the lives of so many victims and their families They took the lives of three beautiful innocent people These bombs changed our beloved Boston in ways we never imagined were possible But the bombs couldn t deter the incredible professionalism and resilience of the medical volunteers These men and women shifted gears instantly from caring for typical runners ailments to coping with a mass trauma event This remarkable resilience enabled these brave men and women to shift from simple first aid to effectively dealing with the worst kind of mayhem The same is true for the health care workers in Boston s incredible hospitals It still astounds me that the number of people killed stayed at three Finally in the worst of circumstances the volunteers the police the first responders and so many ordinary citizens demonstrated a profound and moving degree of empathy After needing to turn away and fight back tears these heroes then rushed in to help and treat the injured These people care so passionately And the empathy evidenced was soon shared by millions across Boston across America and across the world The candle light vigils the moving messages on social media the millions in donations it all started with the basic human connection first shown on Boylston Street just seconds after the bombs went off For the many that were hurt for the families and friends of those killed and maimed nothing will be the same after Monday April 15 2013 They ll need reliability resilience and empathy from their caregivers families friends and themselves now and for the rest of their lives And we ll always remember the heroic men and women who cared for the injured and who made us all incredibly proud We owe them so much Maureen Bisognano Tags Leadership Reliable Processes Front Line Staff International Forum Blog Home Older Average Content Rating 0 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/communities/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=81ca4a47-4ccd-4e9e-89d9-14d88ec59e8d&ID=21 (2016-02-01)
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  • Becoming a Leader at the International Forum
    like minded professionals and students I also wanted to learn more about how quality improvement is changing health care systems around the world Helen Bevan Chief of Service Transformation at NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement presented a session titled A Half Day School for Organizational Radicals that really impacted me I was able to meet other students and professionals who considered themselves to be organizational radicals and were trying to implement change within the health care system We kicked off the session by drawing what we each thought it meant to be an organizational radical please refer to my stick figure picture and then had to share our creations with each other It was pretty evident after going around our table that our individual pictures were tied together by very similar themes These themes included how challenging and lonely it can feel to lead innovative change that every leader needs to align themselves with a group of people with shared values and passions and that the most valuable lessons are in your failures Helen encouraged us to start with ourselves build alliances and learn fast that we don t have to consider ourselves martyrs to be organizational radicals There is an art to learning how to the rock the boat but also stay in it As a change agent in the health care field I am learning that I need to frame change effectively and link values to emotions and a clear action Data can be helpful in achieving this but the power of storytelling is central to creating momentum Often as a student I limit myself when I feel defeated or faced with numerous obstacles It is easy to think that once I become a seasoned professional receive my degree or have a distinguished title next to my name I will be considered a real leader However I am learning quickly that the more I sit around and wait for someone to label me a leader valuable time is being wasted that could be dedicated to making an impact I often find myself having conversations with other students who find themselves in a similar position As Helen encouraged we need to change the way we are having conversations about leadership and innovation We need to create an authentic approach to creating buy in to the change we want to create I want to encourage you to find your authentic approach embrace your failures and join me in saying I am a leader Doesn t it feel good Follow Ariella on Twitter AriellaCamera Tags International Forum medical student Medical School IHI Open School for Health Professions Leadership Blog Home Older Average Content Rating 0 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments Show More Comments Loading You are about to report a violation of our Terms of Use All reports are strictly confidential Reason Select One Contains profanity or violence Spam Defamatory Illegal Unlawful Copyright Violation

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=118 (2016-02-01)
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  • Ask Berwick: What one trait is most important for a young leader?
    it on YouTube In his answer Dr Berwick discusses the importance of student leaders being curious and asking the right questions In an article titled The Science of Quality Improvement that he wrote for the Journal of the American Medical Association Berwick emphasizes the role that academic medicine plays and further traces the importance of curiosity and asking questions through the history of evidence based care and the quality improvement movement Academic medicine has a major opportunity to support the redesign of health care systems it ought to bear part of the burden for accelerating the pace confidence and pervasiveness of that change Health care researchers who believe that their main role is to ride the brakes on change to weigh evidence with impoverished tools ill fit for use are not being as helpful as they need to be Where is the randomized trial is for many purposes the right question but for many others it is the wrong question a myopic one A better one is broader What is everyone learning Asking the question that way will help clinicians and researchers see further in navigating toward improvement You can read the full JAMA article here Do you have a question Join the conversation and Ask Berwick Tweet IHIOpenSchool using AskBerwick email openschool ihi org or comment on Facebook The next question he answers could be yours Tags Ask Berwick medical student Medical School Leadership IHI Open School for Health Professions Blog Home Older Average Content Rating 0 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments Show More Comments Loading You are about to report a violation of our Terms of Use All reports are strictly confidential Reason Select One Contains profanity or violence Spam Defamatory Illegal

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=117 (2016-02-01)
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  • A Problem Too Big To See: The Sobering Reality of Hospital Pricing
    we re going to take a 10 million hit That s the problem hospitals face No executive survives long by giving away money and even not for profits need to perform well financially The incentives are all wrong We all know it But we still must believe that the risk of overhauling the system is greater than that of protecting the status quo since there is no consensus to change it Otherwise why would we continue with payments that have no relationship to actual cost and the quality of the clinical outcome Why would we allow the poor performers to profit from their defects and get reimbursed more than the high performing providers The Health Care Financial Management Association while having done some very effective research on value based payment focused on where Brill incorrectly we think implied nefarious motive in how executives operate within the current payment system They ran right past the enormous truth that we all see every single day the health care reimbursement system is broken for the very people we serve the patients who ultimately pay for health care through their wages for health insurance or directly out of their own pockets So accepting that reality where do we go from here First we need provider and payer leaders who will be relentless in their pursuit of value even when there is uncertainty around the future financial benefit There is a Quixotic aspect to this a leap of faith And enlightened leaders are beginning to move their organizations toward a greater focus on engaging patients and teaching self care toward telemedicine toward home health care and other promising care delivery models But faith will not be enough and finger pointing won t help much either Everyone in health care needs to focus on creating a reimbursement system that rewards value It s a daunting prospect which helps explain why reform efforts have often felt so piecemeal Medicare s new penalties for high readmission rates for instance certainly betters care by providing a financial incentive to prevent unnecessary readmissions But it is just one more correction welded onto a flawed fee for service chassis This alone will never solve our quality problem in health care the payment structure needs a new foundation We have yet to coalesce around exactly what that foundation will be though bundled payment shows great promise Even those payers and providers who grasp the need to move to value based reimbursement wonder understandably just how they can transition organizations long built around and paid for volume One of the greatest aspects of the Affordable Care Act was its chartering of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation which is experimenting with a variety of payment models in the hope of rewarding higher value in the form of better clinical and functional outcomes at lower cost The scale of this challenge is immense but the status quo cannot be justified any longer Brill sums up his take on health care charges with the

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/communities/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=81ca4a47-4ccd-4e9e-89d9-14d88ec59e8d&ID=19 (2016-02-01)
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  • Thinking Along the Continuum
    continuum Too often we think of ourselves and our views on life as being at the poles of being defined in opposition to something or someone else Rich vs poor liberal vs conservative us vs them It s obvious that things like our age and our income lie on a continuum But virtually everything we think of as self defining also lies on a continuum our political ideology our sexual orientation even our gender Thinking in a polar bifurcated way just doesn t help It makes us more territorial more siloed it creates destructive instead of productive competition and it hinders cooperation As health reform unfolds here in the US and in systems across the world thinking in a more holistic comprehensive way is increasingly essential We have to focus on the entire continuum of care To do this well we also have to understand all determinants of health especially the social determinants of health Only by thinking about this entire continuum and the social determinants can we start to address the paradox of more spending on health services not resulting in better health Or why we may be getting wealthier without getting healthier An article in BMJ Quality Safety showed why thinking about how we use our national resources to improve health needs to take into consideration the entire continuum Researchers Elizabeth Bradley Benjamin Elkins Jeph Herrin and Brian Elbel wanted to better understand this paradox They looked at the relationships between expenditures on health services expenditures on social services and health outcomes in 30 OECD countries As you all know the US spends more as a percentage of GDP on health services than any other country The US also spends among the least as a percentage of GDP on social services such as old age pensions employment training support for older adults unemployment benefits and housing support What the researchers found is that the ratio of social spending to health service spending is associated with better health outcomes life expectancy infant mortality potential years of life lost The average ratio of social spending to health service spending for the 30 OECD countries is 2 00 but the ratio for the United States is 0 91 We are one of only two OECD countries to spend more on health services than on social services So what are the implications for health care generally and for primary and community care specifically My take away is that no matter where we work or what we do in health care we need to consistently remind ourselves that we are part of a large continuum one in which everyone clinicians administrators office staff and especially patients plays an important role And we need to remember that health care itself is part of a larger health continuum that to achieve better health we need to think about all aspects of life We need to think about new partnerships about new ways to come together and about all the ways in which the social economic

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/communities/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=81ca4a47-4ccd-4e9e-89d9-14d88ec59e8d&ID=18 (2016-02-01)
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  • Is “Mid Staffordshire” a modern, banal health care fable?
    using incentives for simple things algorithms and active testing for complicated things and building shared aims while focusing on relationships for complex things We need a broad bandwidth for information transfer about complex phenomena This means direct human human interactions for the complex phenomena like caring for one another After all these are deeply grounded in the morality and professional identity underpinning health professional work 2 Measurement is a reductive art When numbers are used to describe a service or a product they are usually related to discrete aspects or attributes of that service or product Deming a statistician was keen to encourage people to use measurement for learning and for the improvement of what they were making Lord Kelvin was on to something when he reminded us that until we can measure something our knowledge of it is superficial But today we live in a festival of measurement which often obscures the basics of good measurement disconnects measures from their designed use and diminishes the learning that might arise from good measures used well Further they invite the assumption that physical distance between the care and those trying to understand and monitor it is inconsequential No measures substitute for direct observation by experienced sensible sensitive observers Paying health professionals for the presence or absence of certain measured attributes of a service or product is very risky It risks distorting the goodness of a given service to those attributes measured Measuring the professional performance involved in creating a service for diverse individuals and paying on the presence absence of one of those attributes is tempting but as the Francis Report documents this can confuse what is important in the work and can actually harm patients So what to do Stop asking measures to do what the eye is better at doing Restore the leader work of physically going to Gemba visiting observing attending to direct engagement with the settings where value in health care is created where patient need and health care giving meet Attending to the importance of the front lines of care is not a priority for making good care it is a precondition 3 Outcomes matter when trying to improve the systems and processes of care related to them Health outcomes are partly related to the professionals and their work partly related to the natural history of the relevant disease biology partly related to the genetic make up of the individual and partly related to the social support and structures that contribute to the context of the person with the illness To pretend that it is simpler than that unfortunately contributes to a sense of professional futility about the urgent need to scientifically engage the improvement of health care A shared conversation about the reality of how outcomes are produced modified is fundamental to attracting the obligatory full professional participation in the needed process es of change So what to do Publicly explore those multiple contributors to outcome and connect cause to effect in ways that help

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/communities/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=81ca4a47-4ccd-4e9e-89d9-14d88ec59e8d&ID=17 (2016-02-01)
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  • SUNY Upstate Medical University Hosts a Leadership Lecture Series Using TED Talks
    like the great conductors Simon Sinek How great leaders inspire action Dan Pink The puzzle of motivation Pictured Students at SUNY Upstate viewing the leadership lectures from TED Talks We attracted members from three of the four colleges and I believe that word will spread to recruit a larger crowd at next month s meeting To advertise we set up a grass roots campaign which focused on recruiting active students in each of the disciplines at Upstate Chapter Leaders presented before large classes in the College of Medicine College of Nursing and College of Health Professions and at the student government s monthly meeting to encourage officers from each class to advertise the meeting to students in their respective programs Each presentation focused on the importance of pioneering the first interprofessional group on campus and the role students can have in improving the systems in the local health care system Going forward we plan to extend our advertising efforts to faculty of the various health programs to join our cause and help promote our opportunities It is very exciting to see our officers ideas coming to fruition We are planning two more installments of the leadership lecture series using TED Talks by the end of the semester and will be screening Escape Fire before the end of the year We believe that leadership training is connected to quality improvement and plan to sponsor a workshop on how to create and manage a medical practice and address how to avoid common oversights that lead to patient care issues In addition to the video series and leadership workshop we recently formed a committee set to start a quality improvement project We are working with faculty advisors and students to select project ideas and are using the IHI Open School courses to build the skills Our goal is to have a concrete project and plan of action by the end of the year We have a very enthusiastic and intelligent group of junior officers and are very excited about the future of the IHI Open School Chapter Jared Smith SUNY Upstate Medical University MS IV Tags IHI Open School for Health Professions Chapter Network Leadership Blog Home Older Average Content Rating 1 user Your comments were submitted successfully Please enter a comment Please login to rate or comment on this content User Comments by Priscilla Worral 2 27 2013 4 07 00 PM I was both surprised and thrilled when I opened my IHI news update and discovered that we have an IHI Open School Chapter I definitely plan to contact the med student who posted and ask when I might start encouraging membership among my colleagues in the nursing department We may not all belong to the same discipline but we all have the same goal to provide evidence based quality care to the communities we serve care that is focused on them loading Did you find this user comment useful people found this user comment useful Report This Show More Comments

    Original URL path: http://www.ihi.org/education/ihiopenschool/blogs/_layouts/ihi/community/blog/itemview.aspx?List=9f16d15b-5aab-4613-a17a-076c64a9e912&ID=101 (2016-02-01)
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