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  • Special Tours 50

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    Original URL path: /eventsedu/past%20events/50th/specialtours.html (2016-02-12)



  • Tibetans in New Mexico
    already living in exile in India and Nepal to move to the United States A number of cluster sites were chosen around the country including the Santa Fe Albuquerque nexus Initially a small group of under fifty the community has been growing steadily due to the fact that many are now becoming U S citizens and bringing their families from South Asia to join them The Resettlement Project is now known as the Reunification Program The photographs taken by Santa Fe based photographer Kitty Leaken document the group from the day of their arrival to the present The labels are culled from oral interviews conducted during the planning of the exhibition and their purpose is to provide an immigrant story a story that continues to unfold as Tibetans progressively adjust to life in America At the same time the Tibetan community is striving to keep their own culture dynamic in their newly adopted homes You will thus view photographs and read personal statements that are suggestive of both cultural adaptation and change New Mexico is becoming increasingly multicultural a fact that challenges the idea of a tri cultural heritage We hope that by getting acquainted with many of the Tibetans

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/hah_tibet/tinm/index.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Mandala

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    Original URL path: /exhibitions/past/hah_tibet/mandala/index.html (2016-02-12)


  • Tibetan Youth Programs

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    Original URL path: /exhibitions/past/hah_tibet/tyouth/index.html (2016-02-12)


  • Altar

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    Original URL path: /exhibitions/past/hah_tibet/altar/index.html (2016-02-12)


  • AT HOME AWAY FROM HOME: Tibetan Culture in Exile Education Guide
    HOME Tibetan Culture in Exile Introduction Connections to Standards and Benchmarks A History of Tibet The Tibetan Resettlement Project New Mexico Tibetan Children in Exile The Kalachakara Mandala Tibetan Prayer

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/hah_tibet/index.html (2016-02-12)
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  • All-American Art of Conspicuous Recycling
    housewifery in the 19th and early 20th centuries and quilts have come to symbolize that thrift But even when making do is not a necessity it remains a challenge and an artistic adventure Sometimes quilters play with the idea of incorporating industrially produced items into the design The use of cornmeal or tobacco sacks bank coin bags men s overalls and blue jean bockets all speak to the quilters ability to challence necessity with wit and ingenuity Junk carries with it the suggestion of other lives and the memories associated with its prior use whether real or imagined Many of the things shown here were made as gifts and as whimsies intended to decorate the home The serve as conversation pieces and as affectionate reminders of the gift giver Now they evoke a certain nostalgia for by gone days and pre industrial ways though the materials employed are all factory made Some recyclers take a particularly bold approach to their work creating large scale sculptures or even whole environments in their yards These artists mainly scavenge their raw materials from dumps and roadsides finding beauty and rich possibilities in the cast offs of our consumer culture Some work within clearly defined community traditions and others do not All of them cleverly use recycled junk to create compelling works of art that validate their individuality or community It all started as a dare could his fishing buddies drink enough beer to make a pop top chain long enough to stretch to the carport They did the chain grew into a whole environment and Ray Cyrek 1930 1995 found his passion Ray a crusty retiree who lived in Homosassas Springs Florida once owned a junkyard He also collected aluminum cans to recycle as supplement to his retirement income and pop tops were

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/recycledreseen/americanpage.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Recycling and the Aesthetics of Sound
    emerged from the scrap heap of the oil industry during the Second World War It was around this time that young islanders began to transform discarded 55 gallon oil barrels into tunable percussive instruments with a revolutionary new sound Some people credit famed steel drummaker Ellie Mannette with the idea of tuning the bottom of a steel drum so that it can produce a wide range of musical notes Today a full orchestra consists of about 25 such drums known locally as pans The pan musicians playing by ear with incredible precision perform everything from calypso to European classics Rattles drums and scrapers are all designed to make sounds and keep the beat For centuries percussion makers from Africa to the Americas have made such instruments from natural materials like gourd hide shell bone pebbles and bark In the 20th century common Euro American cast offs tin cans plastic buckets eating utensils metal pipes brake drums and pot lids have been adapted by folk musicians for percussive music making Not all members of traditional communities are necessarily happy with the change in volume or quality of the resultant recycled sound For example the ceremonial use of bean and food can

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/recycledreseen/soundpage.html (2016-02-12)
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