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  • Recycling in the Global Marketplace
    fill local markets where they are bought and sold Traditional craft skills leather working metallurgy and blacksmithing are cleverly adapted to fit the burgeoning recyclers trade Although the discarded raw materials are quintessentially modern the finished products often bear the imprint of age old style form and tradition In the centuries old city of Marrakech Morocco a narrow market street is piled high with the detritus of the modern age heaps of steel belted radials and other worn out tires With a sharp knife and a quick sleight of hand artisan recyclers ingeniously transform the black rubber rejects of the global automobile industry into fluidly sculpted pots water jugs animal gear and sandals for a local clientele These elegant water vessels are similar in size and shape to the more costly ones made from riveted copper In the port of Dakar Senegal a developing economy has created a market for hundreds of individuals who make do by finding new uses for broken or worn out products Assane Faye is one such recycling entrepreneur who makes and sells briefcases jewelry boxes trunks and toys cut from scavenged tin cans or misprinted metal sheeting from a local canning factory Mr Faye like

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/recycledreseen/globalmarketpage.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Recycling for Fun and Profit
    of modern technology film projectors boom boxes even the latest war vehicles Whether made for fun or profit to resemble the old or mimic the new scrap toys appeal to the creative impulse in each of us If the symbols of Western mass media have penetrated the most remote corners of the globe their whimsical representation is not far behind Televisions boom boxes film projectors and still cameras are favorite subjects for the scrap toymaking set some of whose most admiring fans are Western collectors and visiting tourists In many parts of the world the United States included children play war games using either toy replicas of traditional weapons such as shields spears and arrows or models of contemporary combat In some cases these lifesized prototypes tanks helicopters machine guns and bombs are too familiar reminders of wartime events in the children s lives When American armed forces stationed themselves on the streets of Port au Prince Haiti in 1994 local boys entertained themselves for hours designing miniature replicas of their heroes impressive military vehicles From popular plastic soft drink containers they cut and painted pint sized copies of standard camouflaged tanks helicopters and military cars as well as more

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/recycledreseen/toyspage.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Recycling on the Body
    attract birds whose feathers are a prized form of wealth Thus the red in the label makes a handy substitute for the red feathers more traditionally used in such headdresses This is the kind of cross cultural recycling explored in this section when a person takes an object from another culture and gives it a new social life by wearing it on the body High up in the Andean mountains of central Ecuador costume makers engage in a form of recycling to produce ornate headdresses worn by dancers for the Catholic feast day of Corpus Christi Each headdress is elaborately decorated with a variety of Western maade objects such as light bulbs mirrors chrome car parts plastic toys zippers sunglasses and costume jewelry pieces In some cases the discarded industrial pieces retain the shape and symbolic significance of the more conventional Catholic images which preceded them Other pieces translate the headdresses earlier baroque style with its shiny gold silver and stone studded ornamentation into modern day equivalents such as costume jewelry pieces watch bands silver coins and reflective mirrors These contemporary motifs appeal to the young Indian and mestizo dancers who wear the headdresses in the annual processions Buttons zippers

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/recycledreseen/bodypage.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Recycled Chic
    one of our nation s most exclusive dress designers recently unveiled a spring fashion line that featured sequins made from recycled beverage cans As if to accentuate the ironies and opportunities of global recycling the Mizrahi Company chronicled this line s complicated production cycle first the cans were collected by the homeless of New York City and flattened by immigrant groups in New Jersey They were next shipped to Paris where the pailettes sequins were cut Finally the pailettes and the silk fabric pieces cut in New York were shipped to India where seamstresses sewed them to the fabric Lee Carter is an American designer and wholesaler of a complete line of recycled specialty objects The designs for his products are based on traditional folk Catholic tinwork in Mexico nichos reliquaries and frames but with a contemporary twist that appeals to his hip trans national clientele Namely the tin is recycled from discarded beer fruit battery and vegetable cans with the product labels showing as a conscious stylistic design While Lee dictates the designs and dimensions the objects themselves are fabricated in central Mexico by the Granados family traditional tinsmiths from the town of San Miguel de Allende Once produced

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/recycledreseen/chicpage.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art, Santa Fe| Exhibitions : Current
    Over the next few years working in her hometown of Sefrou Amina organized more than 400 women into a craft association called Golden Buttons Golden Buttons marketed the hand knotted buttons women had been making in their homes for generations Economic success led to the formation in 2000 of the Women s Button Cooperative of Sefrou a for profit cooperative that was the first of its kind organized by women In addition to the button making venture the cooperative now includes a training program for large floor loom weaving a springboard for a literacy campaign for women a women s leadership program a natural dying workshop and other opportunities for successful engagement in public life Photo Amina Yabis weaving at the loom with cooperative member Khadija La Adraoui 2010 Photograph by Oriol Llados RWANDA Gahaya Links Cooperative Weaving For Peace In 100 days of explosive ethnic violence in 1994 Rwandan Hutus murdered some one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus leaving hundreds of thousands of widows and orphans Neighbors killed neighbors war rape was a systematic means of genocide How could a nation possibly recover Ephigenia Mukantabana lost 65 members of her family but has forgiven her family s killer who is now imprisoned Healing began when Ephigenia worked side by side with the man s wife Epiphania as fellow members of a basket weaving cooperative in their home village of South Province From a humble beginning of about 20 women the company has now grown to a network of over 4 000 weavers across the country organized into 52 savings cooperatives Ephigenia credits her work teaching her art to both Hutus and Tutsis as the balm that restored her shattered life Art heals the hopeless soul Ephigenia said And through interaction you reduce trauma Weaving is hope for tomorrow Photo Gahaya Links cooperative member Aristude Mukashyaka displaying her baskets 2009 Photograph courtesy of Fair Winds Trading SOUTH AFRICA Mapula Embroidery Project Let s Talk About This I want people to understand about aids You can t get aids if you touch hug kiss hold hands with someone who is infected These are the words of Nkosi Johnson an 11 year old South African boy who lived with and died from hiv aids Maria Rengane the founder of the Mapula Mother of Rain Embroidery Project in South Africa embroiders Nkosi s words on all of her aids quilts to remind her community and the world that you must not be ashamed of speak out telling the community When you keep quiet you sign your own death warrant With embroidery Maria and the other members of the collective call attention to the joys and hardships of their homeland The women embroider daily life scenes as well as current issues impacting their community such as the World Cup local crime aids and unemployment Even if I had a million rand I would not stop doing this work says Maria I would like to spend all of the years of my life helping communities

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/empoweringwomen/africaempoweringwomen.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art, Santa Fe| Exhibitions : Current
    feel most secured under the roof of my own house Photo Kakuben Jivan Ranmal working with other textile artisans at the Sewa Trade Facilitation Center 2010 Photograph courtesy of sewa LAO PDR OckPopTok Janakpur Women s Development Center East Meets West A decade ago two 20 something women a London fashion photographer and the daughter of a master weaver from the Mekong region of Lao Peoples Democratic Republic came together to form the cooperative OckPopTok which means East Meets West Featuring exquisite silk and cotton weavings this 21st century cooperative is as likely to sell wall hangings inspired by Mark Rothko as the traditional skirts woven with Laotian motifs In 10 years OckPopTok has grown from a one room weaving studio for local weavers to an internationally recognized heritage destination gallery retreat center and women s weaving collaborative for over 200 artisans in three provinces and seven villages But can cultural heritage and the modern global marketplace coexist Joanna Smith cofounder of the cooperative is sure of it A healthy culture is a dynamic one Smith recently told an international newspaper and while respecting design tradition we recognize that it too is constantly evolving It reflects a living culture rather than being the static mirror of history Photo A Tai Lue woman from Ban Na Nyang teaches spinning cotton to a Tai Dam woman from Phongsaly 2010 Photograph by Jack Parsons NEPAL Janakpur Women s Development Center ATA A Foreigner in the Village When Claire Burkert a New England college graduate came to the Nepalese lowlands in 1989 she had no idea how her life or the lives of the women artisans she so admired would be changed forever The women of the Maithili culture were renowned for painting designs on the mud walls of their village homes for weddings

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/empoweringwomen/asiaempoweringwomen.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art, Santa Fe| Exhibitions : Current
    Ossio Bolivia s most prominent ethno botanist began working with them to solve the problem When the Ayoreo community was moved to their reservation there was a garabatá fino plant here but it wasn t of the same quality as the ones in the forest where they lived before Inés says She worked with the community to develop new ways of cultivating a plant with similar properties Today the 45 women of the cooperative harvest the bromeliad as well as produce and market their hand woven fiber bags to an international market Photo Cheque Oitedie Cooperative Members with the newly harvested bromeliad plant 2010 Photograph by Enrique Uzquiano PERU Centro de Textiles Tradicionales del Cusco cttc My Grandmother s Spirit is in the Textile Hand woven textiles in the Peruvian Andes are an important social and ethnic marker and a significant part of the cultural heritage of the region Each community uses a different combination of designs and colors to reflect a connection with the earth Nilda Callañaupa founder and director of the Centro de Textiles Tradicionales del Cusco cttc was born in Chinchero Village near Cusco The granddaughter of a Quechuan master weaver Nilda began spinning wool from sheep

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/empoweringwomen/americasempoweringwomen.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art, Santa Fe| Exhibitions : Current
    folk art production and consumption in the twenty first century We are deeply grateful to the cooperatives artists and leaders who shared their stories artworks and photographs Empowering Women is made possible through the generous support and collaboration of the International Folk Art Market Santa Fe the Ernestine O Connell Annuity the International Folk Art Foundation and the Museum of New Mexico Foundation Empowering Women is a traveling exhibition Venues

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/empoweringwomen/acknowempoweringwomen.html (2016-02-12)
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