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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Dolls Around the World
    Global Village Santa Fe NM Museum of New Mexico Press 1995 Laury Jean Ray Doll Making A creative Approach New York van Nostrand Reinhold Co 1970 Children s Books Albert Kathy Japanese Boy and Girl Paper Dolls New York Dover Publications Inc 1991 Albert Kathy Mexican Girl and Boy Paper Dolls New York Dover Publications Inc 1992 Albert Kathy Traditional Folk Costumes of Europe Paper Dolls in Full Color New

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/girard/dolls/dollsbibliography.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Girard
    fabric strips and glue to cover the arms and legs Assembling the Doll 5 Put glue on one side of the body 6 Place arms across newspaper body right at the fold 7 Place legs lengthwise perpendicular to arms on newspaper body Make sure the legs are touching the arms 8 Fold the newspaper body over arms and legs Secure with tape 9 Glue cork onto shoulders and secure with

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/girard/dolls/brazilliandoll.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula- Girard Architecture
    houses in which spirits are believed to live placed near entrances to houses in Thailand Szopka miniature puppet theaters made in the forms of churches used in Poland by carolers especially during the Christmas season Temple a building dedicated to a system of worship of a deity or deities Tower a building characterized by its great height Project Architectural Clay Tiles NM Standards Art 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Objectives 1 To understand how architecture reflects the cultures that it comes from historical and cultural understanding 2 To name and use architectural terms in discussions perceiving analyzing and responding 3 To create an architectural from using clay creating and performing Materials Regular or self hardening clay enough for one 4 diameter sphere for each student rolling pins rolling pin guides flat wooden strips clay tools or pencils water water containers newspaper to cover tables large paper clips paint or glazes optional Motivation Walk around the school neighborhood or have students bring in photos of their homes or images of other buildings that they like or have strong feelings about Begin a discussion of different types of building styles Talk about the different types of buildings that compose a neighborhood Introduce the topic of building materials and explore the types of building materials that students are familiar with Do building materials come directly from the environment they are used in How do architectural styles reflect the climate and or culture Some students may want to talk about energy use and energy efficiency related to their homes or green construction Tell the students that they will be rolling out clay to make slabs that will be used to make tiles They can make their tile into whatever building form they would like to make Some students may want to work in groups to make tiles that connect or relate to each other the same way that neighborhood buildings do Procedure 1 Place several layers of opened newspaper at each student s place On top of the newspaper place the rolling pin guides parallel and about 8 apart Have students use the rolling pins to create an even slab by resting the rolling pins on the guides and rolling back and forth over the clay 2 Use a pencil or a clay tool to draw the outline of a building form on the clay tile Change the shape but try not remove too much clay 3 Take the cut away clay or use additional clay to make architectural elements like windows doors balconies roofing materials and people or animals that might reside in or be walking in front of the building Some students may want to draw these elements with pencils or clay tools 4 Remind students to score wet and blend the additional pieces of clay that they are adding to the tile to make sure they stick 5 When finished insert a large paper clip in the back to use to hang the tile on the wall 6

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/girard/architecture/architecture.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Masks & Celebrations in Mexico
    self the wearer was transported from the world of the ordinary to a realm that was normally out of reach This quote from El Museo Hispanico in San Francisco beautifully describes the function of masking in Mexico and highlights the way that making celebrations evoke another time and place Ordinary time is restructured to allow for the extraordinary to predominate In Mexico the tradition of mask making and mask wearing is interwoven with particular celebrations as an integral part of feasting dancing and rigorous preparation for community festivities Mask ceremonials in Mexico have evolved in a manner that synthesizes Pre Christian and Catholic beliefs Festivals are integral to Mexican life punctuating the cycle of the year with special events Festivities occur in saints days Christmas New Year s Catholic Holidays Candlemas Carnival Holy Week and for the Day of the Dead Observing seasonal changes such as the inception of planting and the rainy season are often celebrated in conjunction with religious holidays Motivations for dance festivals are various and include fulfillment of religious promises invocation of supernatural aid for the community thanks for a good harvest and devotion to a particular saint A family or couple within the Community will take on the responsibility for sponsoring a particular dance This is a huge commitment to the community requiring a considerable expenditure of time money and energy A family that is a festival sponsor garners respect and status While the feeling behind masked ceremonies is expansive expressive and celebratory the dances themselves are highly structures and very strenuous Traditionally women make the costumes and men makes the masks The dancers are usually male Over time exceptions and changes to these roles have developed Mask makers are highly respected members of the community They must know the sequences of all the local

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/girard/masks/maskinto.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula- Girard Amulets Milagros & Ex-Votos
    Ex votos in Mexico are devotional objects of the working classes and are sold at churches chapels and sanctuaries Often representing parts of the body they are attached to the clothing of statues of saints While these charm like objects are becoming more popular outside of the religious realm they are an integral part of the folk medical systems in Mexico and Latin America Peru Amulets in Peru are used to promote agricultural production and as part of animal husbandry rites Ritual stone objects called illas illa chacras and mesas are used by people in the Quechua and Aymara region of the South Andes Illa chacras are used in branding ceremonies while the illas and mesas are utilized in healing rites and agricultural ceremonies Sometimes they are buried included with an object that is burned or placed in a ritual bundle The motifs that appear on the illas and mesas are abstract representing a symbolic language Morocco PHOTO Amulets and Talisman from Morocco Girard Collection Museum of International Folk Art DCA Santa Fe NM A 1981 42 704V 1 Muslims use amulets for protection and talismans to deal with a specific matter for a limited time period Writing is incorporated to invoke magic and to animate prayers Small boxes like envelopes hold written talismans sometimes made of metal or animal vegetal or mineral materials One popular amulet form is the hand often appearing with an eye on the palm The hand form is called a khamsa in Arabic and a hamez in Hebrew The number five is associated with the hand form and it can represent the hand of Fatima the daughter of the prophet Mohammed the five pillars of Islam the five daily prayers of the Muslim world or the prophet Mohammed and his family For Moroccan Berbers the

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/girard/amultets/amintro.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Folk Art of the Andes
    like to work with scissors pencils glue sticks sequins plastic gems optional Motivation Peruvian retablos are portable boxes that are decorated to represent scenes from everyday life or devotional figures like saints Mixed media elements are used to create scenery and decoration like paint stones feathers fabric and leather Figures are sculpted out of pasta a combination of dried potato calcium and liquid Have your students look at portable altars and scenes from Peru or images of them Tell your students that they can make their own retablo that is a scene from everyday life for example a room at home their street or school another neighborhood scene or vista They can choose to represent a memorable event such as a birthday or another celebration Students can also create a retablo that depicts a devotional image someone who is important to them a hero or heroine important family or community figure or a religious image Have the students share some of their ideas in a group discussion Explain that you will be working with small boxes and or folded papers and that they will be decorating their retablos with decorated papers images drawings and their imaginations Procedure 1 Have the students select either a box or a piece of stiff paper to use to create their retablo Some students may choose to use both if they can Show the students how to either draw a retablo form on the paper or use a pattern to trace then cut out and fold the paper 2 Students can then select decorated and colored paper and pictures to use 3 The papers are cut out and glued into place with glue sticks Encourage the students to consider and possibly decorate all of the sides of their retablo 4 Students should make sure that

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/andes/postablealtars.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Folk Art of the Andes
    flowers people and animals Photo Left Devil Masks Imbabura Ecuador ca 1980 Left Gift of Lloyd E Cotsen and the Neutrogena Corporation MOIFA Right International Folk Art Foundation Collection MOIFA Photograph by Blair Clark Masks from Ecuador Heavy wooden masks are worn by dancers for festivals that take place in different communities in the Cotopaxi Province located in the central highlands of Ecuador Some masks are made in small workshops like the one operated by the Huacho family in Saquisilí while others are carved by farmers during their spare time Many of the masks represent animals including monkeys wolves tigers and fierce dogs The large heads and faces are carved from one piece of wood the ears are often made separately from wood or other materials and then attached Each dancer within a group wears a different animal masquerade while they all rowdily proceed through the fiesta as if they were a pack of dangerous beasts Some carvers produce masks portraying clowns or men and women with European or African features Photo Dog Masks Cotopaxi Ecuador Left ca 1950 International Folk Art Foundation Collection MOIFA Center ca 1975 Gift of Peter P Cecere MOIFA Right ca 1950 International Folk Art Foundation Collection MOIFA Photo by Blair Clark Questions for Discussion When do you wear masks What types of masks do you like to wear Who are the scary characters that you see during Halloween What kinds of animals do you see What kinds of human characters Why do you think people choose to wear those types of masks How do you think wearing masks makes them feel Wire Screen Festival Masks The use of wire screen to produce lightweight masks was introduced into South America from central Europe sometime in the late nineteenth or early twentieth century it is a

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/andes/festivalmasks.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Folk Art of the Andes
    late nineteenth century He told the group of intellectuals about the decline in these art forms due to a breakdown of the established distribution system to the rural clientele One of the women on the trip suggested they try marketing the portable boxes to collectors in Lima and broaden the subject matter inside them to depict festivals and other activities from the Ayacucho region This initiated a new form of

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/andes/peruvianretablos.html (2016-02-12)
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