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  • Hat Project Neutrogena Collection

    (No additional info available in detailed archive for this subpage)
    Original URL path: /eventsedu/education/neutrogena/hats/lp.html (2016-02-12)


  • Neutrogena Resist Dye Techniques

    (No additional info available in detailed archive for this subpage)
    Original URL path: /eventsedu/education/neutrogena/dye/bi.html (2016-02-12)


  • Neutrogena Resist Dye Project

    (No additional info available in detailed archive for this subpage)
    Original URL path: /eventsedu/education/neutrogena/dye/lp.html (2016-02-12)


  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Century of Masters
    began in 1982 to preserve and continue folkloric and craft traditions in the United States The fellowship covers many genres ethnic groups and categories across the country New Mexico is one of the states with the highest numbers of artists per capita to receive this honor To celebrate the artists and their work this exhibition celebrates Artist santero Charles M Carrillo received his award in 2006 Cochiti potter Helen Cordero who is deceased received her award in 1986 Colcha embroiderer Frances Varos Graves who is deceased received her award in 1994 Artist woodcarver George López who is deceased received his award in 1982 Artist santero Ramón José López received his award in 1997 Ohkay Owingeh San Juan Pueblo storyteller Esther Martínez who is deceased received her award in 2006 Musicians Roberto Lorenzo Martínez received their award in 2003 Straw Appliqué Artists Eliseo Paula Rodríguez who are deceased received their award in 2004 Artists and tin workers Emilio Senaida Romero who are deceased received their award in 1987 Santa Clara potter Margaret Tafoya who is deceased received her award in 1984 Rio Grande Weaver Irvin Trujillo received his award in 2007 Storyteller and singer Cleofes Vigil who is deceased received his

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/centuryofmasters/century.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Century of Masters
    with freehand chain stitch embroidery using many fabulous shapes and colors These embroidered cloths were made in villages along the length of the Euphrates River and used as room dividers curtains wall hangings bed coverings and occasionally as floor coverings Men wove the cloth and women embroidered the motifs according to their own sensibilities Photograph by Addison Doty Museum of International Folk Art P O Box 2087 Santa Fe NM

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/materialworld/texintro.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Needles + Pins
    of textiles and their making We talk of the fabric of life and the thread of a narrative or story of someone cut from whole cloth and the act of weaving together a community Making and using cloth permeates everyday life even though few people these days are directly involved in the process Cloth is made embellished or constructed with tools which started out as a simple extension of the human hand The same processes done by the hand operated loom spinning wheel and needle are carried out today in computerized factories The scale has changed but the basic processes and tools have not Needles and Pins Textiles and Tools showcases many variations of the tools developed over time and by different people Textiles and garments illustrate the dazzling possibilities that result by combining human creativity and skill with these surprisingly simple tools Embellished textiles can express cultural identity as well as personal creativity People use cloth and clothing to signify cultural belonging or separateness In many places a woman s ability with loom or needle still demonstrates her worth as a wife and provider for her family Since the Industrial Revolution of the 19th century many waves of textile

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/needlesandpins/nandpintro.html (2016-02-12)
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  • handmade planet intro
    living earth Norwegian Bridal Crown Norway c 1750 Home Hearth and Garden You feel at home a quote from Pacific Discover Magazine shortly after MOIFA opened in 1953 Museum founder Florence Dibell Bartlett hoped that every visitor would take an active part in exploring the collections to learn about the peoples of the world She envisioned a place where people would feel both a sense of adventuring far afield and being familiarly at home Contrasting styles paired with similar shapes and designs play off each other in the variety of costumes plates household items and garden views gathered from around the world and displayed here Neighborhood Views and Friendly Critters Tutto il mondo e paese The whole world is hometown is an Italian proverb quoted by designer collector and MOIFA donor Alexander Girard Collections at MOIFA span the planet and are vast in their diversity while also reflecting universal themes familiar daily routines and common rites of passage Illustrating this is a small selection of wedding items from various countries inspired by Florence Bartlett s love of collection many wedding related objects Folk art abounds with depictions of animals in every medium shape and size only a few are shown here from far and wide to inhabit for a time this temporary display of a handmade planet Music speaks a universal language and folk music has always been a part of the museum collections and programs from the opening weekend in 1953 to the present Wild Animals and Mythological Beings In our world we need a clear awareness of the interdependent nature of nations of humans and animals and of humans animals and the world Everything is of interdependent nature H H Dalai Lama Every group of people has confronted aspects of the unknown the places where the maps of the world depict dragons sea monsters strange stars and other mythological beings People also live near wild animals that can become symbols for learning about boundaries and confronting fears When these wild animals and unfamiliar things are not the provocation for annihilation or warfare they can be fertile ground for new creations and awareness Travelers collectors and museum themselves are conduits for bringing varying interpretations of the unfamiliar to others and for providing a way to begin to look for common ground Stamp picture USA Benjamin Ulmer 1895 1900 Upheaval and Disruption Unfortunately on occasion there are barriers and unforeseen disturbances that people confront before seeking the ideal which Florence Bartlett sought to illustrate by founding the museum Sometimes the bonds of fellowship are raveled and war erupts But even in these circumstances folk art prevails and sometimes the horror gets turned against itself to protect the weak and somehow beauty is created from it Seeking Common Ground We must all live together even though we are unduly separated in ideas cultures and interests because we can never again live apart We must learn somehow to live together in peace Dr Martin Luther King Jr A similar message penned by

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/handmadeplanet/intro.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Dressing Up Intro
    to pants known as breeching signified the beginning of a boy s passage into manhood The age at which breeching occurred depended on parental influences and social practices At the beginning of the 19th century boys ages three to six wore skeleton suits which were like contemporary jumpsuits Skeleton suits were not worn by older boys or men After six years of age they wore trousers with a tunic overdress Then in the mid 1800 s the knickerbocker suit or knee length trousers came into fashion Three year old boys wore knicker suits until they were about twelve years old when they began to dress much more like their adult counterparts Still there were notable differences in the clothing worn by boys and men For example while men wore cut away frock coats with knee length tails boys wore jackets without tails Pant leg length was another telling distinction From the 1870 s to the 1940 s men wore long trousers and boys wore short trousers By the end of the 1800 s the breeching age had dropped from six years old to two and the age of wearing long trousers usually twelve to thirteen was seen as much more significant than breeching During this time clothing worn by females did not undergo nearly as much transformation The length of one s clothes however did relate to one s age Girls skirts were shorter than women s At the beginning of the 19th century high waists and narrow skirts were worn by youngsters of both genders In mid century women wore fitted bodices and full skirts During this time dresses worn by boys and preadolescent girls were more like each others than similar to what women were wearing Children wore dresses slightly below the knee that had wide off the

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/dressingup/introduction.html (2016-02-12)
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